Beware off and respect Wildlife., Banff National Park

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  • Animal crossings
    Animal crossings
    by easterntrekker
  • Beware off and respect Wildlife.
    by lazyman_1
  • Mountain Goat Crossing
    Mountain Goat Crossing
    by lhe
  • lazyman_1's Profile Photo

    What not to do

    by lazyman_1 Updated Jul 30, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    They may be cute and thy may look friendly but DO NOT feed the animals. This little guy has obviously been acclimitized to human contact which is not a good thing. These are wild animals. Sooner or later this the chipmunk will bite somebody or become so reliant on handouts that he won't be able to fend for himself. Let wild animals stay wild. Observe but do not interact!

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  • Enjoy the wildlife but keep your distance

    by darylmitchell Written Apr 18, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of Banff National Park's attractions is its wildlife, especially the larger mammals. Moose, elk, mountain goats, mountain lions, bears and wolves inhabit the park. They are quite a sight to see but they must be given space as they are wild animals. If they lose their natural fear of humans they can become a nuisance or even a threat.

    Read all the literature about wildlife that the park staff give you. Do not feed or approach the animals, no matter how adorable they look. If there are baby animals then a protective mother cannot be far away. Mating season can bring out aggressive behaviour in animals. Seal and store food securely, and dispose of garbage properly. Be watchful while driving in case animals run out onto the road. When hiking, stick to marked trails and make noise so that you don't surprise animals. Avoid using strongly scented soaps and personal care products which could attract animals.

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  • Don't be one of those tourists we read about....

    by Jen.W Written Mar 10, 2005

    Too many times, we've read about tourists getting a little too close to the elk that wander around the town of Banff....they ARE wild!!

    The picture you see is from:
    http://www.alberta-travel.com/files/Banff-Park-Information.html

    Don't get too close!!

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  • lhe's Profile Photo

    Beware of Elks

    by lhe Written Sep 1, 2004

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Surprisingly, elks are most dangerous animals (even more than bears). They cause more injuiries than any other animals in the park. Do not try to get close to them and take photos. Their behaviors are unpredictable, especially during their mating season.

    Elk
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  • lhe's Profile Photo

    Black Bears

    by lhe Updated Sep 1, 2004

    I was quite lucky this morning. A black bear with her cubs were spotted right after I get off my car at the Herbert lake parking lot in the early morning. They were having breakfast in the bushes :) I tried not to disturb them and waited a while until they went away.

    Black Bear
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  • Webboy's Profile Photo

    Wildlife - respect it!

    by Webboy Written Jul 23, 2004

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    As you will be aware, there is plenty of wildlife within both Banff and Jasper National Parks. The unfortunate thing is that there are also some stupid mindless morons (and that is being polite!), chasing the wildlife everywhere just to get the special picture.

    There are even more stupid mindless morons who seem to have lost the ability to read warning signs, and generals signs on how to treat any wildlife you should meet on the roads.

    There were 3 incidents that amazed me:

    1) People out of their cars, climbing a roadside banking to get a close up picture of a Black Bear - about 10ft away from a sign quite clearly saying "STAY IN CAR AT ALL TIMES - YOU ARE IN BEAR COUNTRY!"

    2) People screeching on breaks (in wet weather!), getting out and abandoning their cars in the middle of the road to get picture of some Elk grazing at the side of the road - both scaring the Elk and blocking the road completely in both directions!

    3) Some plonker, sitting right behind 4 bighorn sheep peeping his horn over and over and over to try and get the sheep to move! They were only on one side of the road - he could quite simple have slowly driven around them! Whats worse is that he got so close to them that they got a fright and ran away in all directions - what a complete idiot!

    Be warned that there are lots of these people around - they should all be completely ashamed of themselves!

    We are proud to say that we never put any wildlife or ourselves in danger at any time and paid complete attention to all signs at all times - after all, thats what they are there for!

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  • MissAntarctica2002's Profile Photo

    Elk: More Dangerous Than They Look

    by MissAntarctica2002 Written Jan 21, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I went on a tour up to Johnson's Canyon. On the way theere was an elk standing near the side of the road, so the tour guide stopped the bus to explain and let us take pictures.

    when asked why he wasn't letting us off the bus to get a closer look and get better pictures he explained that elk are the most dangerous animals in the Banff area. While 9 times out of 10 elk will be calm and harmless, it really sucks to be #10 and end up in the hospital for months with a punctured lung, or worse. He said he'd rather take on a grizzly than tangle with an angry elk.

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  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Do not pose family members with the wildlife

    by zrim Written Aug 11, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This photo is not real, it is a dramatization of events that I observed firsthand in Banff. The actors are trained professionals. Do not try this at home.

    Seriously, I doctored this picture in photoshop to show my wife Becky next to an elk. But in Banff we observed a man coaxing his wife (or girlfriend) ever closer to a male elk so that finally she was within an arm's distance of the elk. The elk could have caused serious damage. National Parks are not petting zoos. I don't understand why people want to get so darn close.

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  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Buy yourself a good telephoto lense

    by zrim Updated Jul 26, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If it is important to you to get good close-up shots of wildlife (it was for me) then for goodness sakes get yourself the right equipment. The disposable kodak cameras are not going to get the job done. Nor are the standard lenses that come with a SLR.

    This guy looks pretty close--but in reality I was standing behind my car a good distance away from him. I never approached an elk to get a better shot. I just waited until they positioned themselves in my line of sight and I zoomed.

    Many idiots walked right up to the elk getting within ten feet or so. Again dangerous for the person and dangerous for the elk. I hate sounding like a shrew, but you cannot imagine how many times we saw people approaching the wildlife.

    hey buddy can't you see I'm having dinner
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  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Grizzly Bears

    by zrim Updated Jul 26, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Banff is home to many grizzly bears, however, the park enompasses such a vast area that it is highly unlikely that any one visitor will come face to face with a grizzly. They do tend to move up into the high country and backcountry in the summer when visitors are most plentiful. There are exceptions. In 2002 a grizzly sow and her cubs frequented the Morraine Lake area and several of the trails in the Consolation Lakes area were deemed to be very dangerous and hikers were told to hike in groups of six or more.

    Certainly no one would want to get this close to a grizzly (it is stuffed and on display in the Lake Louise visitor center) but seeing a grizzly from a mile away or so is always thrilling. I have seen plenty of grizzly in Denali in Alaska, but none on the recent trip to the Canadian Rockies.

    One thing is for sure, never move towards a grizzly. They are the most dangerous, unpredictable and deadly animals on the North American continent.

    stuffed griz
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  • zrim's Profile Photo

    There is no need to molest the little guys either

    by zrim Written Jul 26, 2003

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    This friendly little fellow is the golden-mantled ground squirrel. Quite cagy and darts in and out of rocks with great agility. Unfortunately, some hikers who came upon this fellow after us, tried to tease him. They held out their fingers to him as if offering food. Why were they surprised when he lunged at their outstrectched hands. Deserved a good biting, they did.

    don't feed the squirrels
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  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Slow down

    by zrim Written Jul 26, 2003

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    The reason we go to places like Banff is to enjoy the stunning scenery and hopefully, if we are lucky, to get a glimpse of wildlife. Two things: if you whiz by at 60 miles an hour, you wont see the wildlife; and, you never know what is around the next corner. Speed kills animals and sometimes people.

    Take these bighorned lambs. They were chewing gravel on the parkway without adult supervision. They seemed completely oblivious to the vehicles. What a shame it would be if someone came tearing through at too high of a speed to stop for the unwary lambs.

    In my mind vacations are a time to slow everything down and take enjoyment even from the simple act of driving. What is the use of whizzing from one sight to the next in record speed. The journey is half of the fun.

    hey kids get out of the road
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  • zrim's Profile Photo

    Black Bears

    by zrim Updated Jul 26, 2003

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    It should be self-evident, but apparently it is not, no one should ever approach a black bear. If you take some time to travel some of the side roads in Banff, chances are good that you will see a black bear snacking on berries along the side of the road. It is often easy to spot a black bear--just look for the bear jams (several cars pulled over to the side of the road with people pointing into the undergrowth.)

    Parks Canada understands that people are going to pull over and gawk at the bears. People do want to see wildlife free and roaming. However, it is totally unacceptable to move towards the bear in an attempt to get a better photo. We saw this behavior several times. It is dangerous for the people, yes, but it is also dangerous for the bear. A bear that becomes accustomed to people is a dangerous bear and often in the end becomes a dead bear because park officials have to put it down.

    this photo was taken from inside our vehicle!
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  • Fudge's Profile Photo

    Chipmunks snatch!

    by Fudge Updated Jul 26, 2003

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    Well, not really a danger or warning in that serious sense of the word. More so, a word of caution. While they are cute to look at, chipmunks found in Banff National Park were really bold, and hungry little things. They wanted to keep eating and eating whatever you were having!

    They do get frightened though, and hence scamper when you wave your hand a bit too hard. But will come back to disturb u over and over.

    Zal was kneeling near this chipmunk and offering her hand as sniffing bait :)

    Friendly lil chipmunks
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  • CdnJane's Profile Photo

    Beware what might be round the next bend

    by CdnJane Written Jun 10, 2003

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    Please be careful driving through Banff or any of the other National Parks as the road curves. You might find animals on the road, or you might miss an incredible view! Your navigator / passengers should keep their eyes peeled for wild life on the sides of the road. Make sure you have your camera handy loaded for the next amazing picture!

    Mountain Goats beside the Road
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