Drumheller Things to Do

  • Drumheller's little white church
    Drumheller's little white church
    by jojes
  • Drumheller's little white church
    Drumheller's little white church
    by jojes
  • Wayne, Alberta
    Wayne, Alberta
    by jojes

Most Recent Things to Do in Drumheller

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    Royal Tyrell - This museum is the best!

    by jojes Updated Jan 28, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When you're visiting Alberta, this place is a stop you absolutely have to make!
    In the Royal Tyrell Museum it's all about paleontology, so if you're a dinosaur fan, this is the place to be.

    The museum opened in 1985 and was named after Joseph Burr Tyrrell (1858-1957). He was the geologist who - in 1884 - found the first dinosaur fossil in the valley of the Red Deer River. It was a 70-million-year-old carnivorous dinosaur skull. This find was named Albertosaurus sarcophagus (meaning: “flesh eating lizard from Alberta”). Because this find was so very important the museum was named in his honour.
    The original plan was to open a research facility, but soon the plan rose to make galleries and exhibition spaces available to the public.
    In 1990 her Majesty Queen Elisabeth gave the museum it's 'Royal' title.

    The museum houses over 130.000 specimen, with about 2.000 specimen being added annually.
    It is divided into several galleries which take you through earth's history.
    There are impressive skeletons, of which most are made with the original bones. I've been tols by an employee at the museum that about 73% of all bones on display are original.
    You can also have a look at the preparation lab, where scientists prepare remains for display and for further research. You can't enter the lab itself, but you can watch them work through the large windows. And sometimes a scientist takes up his place in the exhibition room so you can watch him upclose. When we were there, one of the scientists was excavating a piece of bone. Our kids loved that ... He answered every possible question they had about his work (and trust me: they had lots of questions ;-) ).

    If you want to visit the entire museum thoroughly, make sure you take at least 3 hours to do so.
    There are several interactive stations, where both adults and kids can participate.

    Opening hours & prices (2015)
    * October 1 - May 14, 2015: tuesday through sunday - 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (monday only open on public holidays)
    * May 15 - August 31, 2015: open seven days a week - 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
    * September 1 - 30, 2015: open seven days a week - 10:00 a. m. - 5:00 p.m.

    Prices:
    Adult (18-64): $13.00 (one day) - $19.50 (2 days)
    Senior (65+): $10.00 (one day) - $15.00 (2 days)
    Youth (7-17): $7.00 (one day) - $10.50 (2 days)
    Children (6 and under): free admittance
    Family price (two adults + their children ages 7-17 - max. group size of 8): $35.00 (one day) - $52.50 (2 days)

    You are welcome to take pictures inside the museum, just make sure you don't scare the live specimen ;-)

    Royal Tyrell Museum - friendly face when entering Royal Tyrell Museum - T-Rex Royal Tyrell Museum - Triceratops Royal Tyrell Museum - children's playroom Royal Tyrell Museum - scientist at work
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    Interpretive walk near Royal Tyrell Museum

    by jojes Written Jan 28, 2015

    Right outiside the Royal Tyrell Museum you can find the start of an interpretive walk in this area of the Badlands.

    The loop is only 1,4 kilometres long, but if you want to take in everything it can take well up to an hour before you're back at the start.

    If you go up the hill outside the museum, you have a good view of the size of the museum and the surrounding grounds.

    As everywhere in these protected areas, please stay on the marked paths ... Don't do as we've seen so many people do when we were there: leave the paths to wander off ... This only damages this fragile surrounding.

    Interpretive walk near Royal Tyrell Museum Royal Tyrell Museum Interpretive walk near Royal Tyrell Museum
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    Horsethief Canyon

    by jojes Written Jan 28, 2015

    Another fabulous stop on the 'Dinosuar trail' is Horsethief Canyon.

    This canyon got it's name in the time there were still a lot of ranches out here.
    The horses would run in the canyon and 'disappear'. Lots of them were later found again, carrying a brand from another ranch. It is said that the horsethieved hid the stolen horses somewhere in the canyon before re-selling them.

    This viewpoint offers some spectacular views of the Badlands.
    But you can also go down into the canyon do do some hiking. But be careful as it is easy to get lost and there are n real signs pointing out directions.

    The parking is RV friendly. There are no fences at the edge of the cliff, so watch out when you've got kids with you.

    Horsethief canyon Horsethief canyon Horsethief canyon Horsethief canyon Horsethief canyon's little inhabitants
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    The Bleriot Ferry

    by jojes Written Jan 23, 2015

    Following the 'Dinosuar trail' will lead you up to the Bleriot Ferry.
    This ferry takes you over the Red Deer River. The original ferry was first in operation in 1913.
    It is one of the remaining 7 ferries in Alberta and is the last operated cable ferry. It's the last remaining ferry out of the 13 that used to cross the Red Deer River.
    It spans a length of 105 metres of the river. The ferry itself is nearly 28 metres long and little over 10 metres wide. It can take up to 13 mid-sized cars in one go.

    Crossing the river only takes about 5-8 minutes. The ferry runs upon request, just show up and it will take you over the river.

    The operator on duty was very friendly and noticably proud of being able to do this job.
    We had a nice chat with him in the time we were waiting and crossing. He showed us the mechanism that pulls the ferry across and explained everything to the kids.

    When we asked him how much we had to pay, he replied that "a smile is more than enough" ... :-)

    Operation times*
    8 a.m. - 7 p.m. from late April to the May long weekend
    8 a.m. - 11 p.m. daily from the May long weekend to September long weekend
    8 a.m. - 7 p.m. from the day after the September long weekend to October 23

    Bleriot ferry On Bleriot ferry Bleriot ferry - the friendly operator Red Deer River seen from Bleriot ferry Bleriot ferry nearly docking again
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    Orkney viewpoint - simply beautiful

    by jojes Written Jan 23, 2015

    When driving the Dinosaur trail in the surroundings of Drumheller, make sure to stop at the Orkney Viewpoint overlooking the Red Deer River.
    The viewpoint is located west of Drumheller.
    It offers spectacular views for kilometres long over the winding Red Deer river and the surrounding badlands.
    The viewpoint is on top of a cliff and only a small part of it is fenced off, so be careful especially with kids.

    The parking lot is easily accessible over a small gravel road.
    The viewpoint is closeby to the Bleriot Ferry.

    Orkney viewpoint Orkney viewpoint Orkney viewpoint Orkney viewpoint Orkney viewpoint
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    Drive to Wayne

    by jojes Updated Jan 23, 2015

    Wayne is a tiny little town east of Drumheller.
    There once used to be about 2500 people living there at the time when the coalmine was still in operation.
    When the mine closed down during the times of the Great Depression, most people left. A lot of them even took took down their house to rebuild it somewhere else - this was because materials were scarce and expensive. This is the reason why nowadays there aren't many houses left from that time.
    Nowadays it is nearly a ghost town - nearly, because there are 27 residents still living there.

    The Rosedeer Hotel and The Last Chance Saloon are the last remnants of days gone by. The hotel was built in 1913.
    At the time when we visited, there was a large group in the Saloon, so we didn't go in because it was already full.

    The drive to Wayne leads you through the Badlands, leaving you with stunning scenery to photograph.
    You'll pass 11 bridges on the about 6 kilometres long road leading into 'town'.

    Here is the link to an article about the town and the hotel: ghost hunting

    Wayne, Alberta Wayne, Alberta Along the way to Wayne, Alberta Along the way to Wayne, Alberta Along the way to Wayne, Alberta
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    The little white church

    by jojes Written Jan 23, 2015

    Right next to the Royal Tyrell Museum you'll find this little white church.
    Their motto is "Seating 10,000 people, 6 at a time". Well, they're right about the seating 6 ... because that's all that can fit into the church.
    On either side there are 3 one-person pews. Besides that the only one who can fit in is the Minister himself.
    It was constructed in 1968 and re-build in 1991. It wasn't made especially for tourists, it was a genuine place of worship for the locals and the visitors of the Badlands.
    But don't expect too much ... I'm sorry to say that it is somewhat neglected. It wasn't very well maintained.
    Some kind of sign with some explanation might also be nice.
    But it makes for a nice stop for some pictures, but you'll probably be in and out in about 5-10 minutes. And you'll pass it anyway when you drive the 'Dinosaur trail' to/from the museum.

    Drumheller's little white church Drumheller's little white church Drumheller's little white church Drumheller's little white church Drumheller's little white church

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    Funland Amusement Park

    by Karlie85 Updated Aug 10, 2012

    For a little bit of relaxing fun, head over to the Funland Amusement Park. There are bumper boats, a batting cage, and, my favorite, dinosaur themed mini golf! The course is very small, but it is still fun and takes a decent amount of time to go through. It looks like it should only take 5 minutes, but it takes just as long as any other mini golf course. There is a concession stand with burgers, hot dogs, pop, chips and the like, as well as a small gift shop.

    Open every day May-Sept, 10am-8pm.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Theme Park Trips

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    Royal Tyrrell Museum

    by canuckmike Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Straight up, this is the top site in Drumheller. You can tell it's a great museum because it has the title of 'Royal' in the title and that isn't just given away to any place. This is an excellent museum for all ages. Opened September 25th, 1985 and named after Joseph Burr Tyrrell. It's a large building of 11,200 square metres with 4,400 of them dedicated to exhibits. This is the only place in Canada solely dedicated to palaeontology.

    I found the museum well laid out. It had an easy to follow path that takes you through various periods of history. Most of the exhibits are origianl fossils while some are casts. One of my favourite ones is of the wooly mammoth skeleton with the sabertooth tiger skeleton jumping off a cliff onto the wooly mammoth. Besides the exhibits there is a window that allows you to view the preparation lab where the carefully prepare the fossils.

    Besides the exhibits, there is a really excellent gift shop that is fairly fun to wonder around in. There is ample parking here as it can get busy at times. For me it was $10 to get in which is well worth the price. Look at the website for more info.

    Royal Tyrell Museum

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    The World's Largest Dinosaur

    by Quartzy Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you're in Drumheller, you need to make a stop to see that big dinosaur. You won't miss anything if you don't go up to its head, except perhaps the view (and for a buck or two, it might be worth it).

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    Royal Tyrrell Museum

    by sunnywong Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Situated in the spectacular badlands of the Red Deer River Valley, the Royal Tyrrell Museum near Drumheller is a major research and exhibition centre and one of the largest palaeontological museums in the world. Every year, almost 400,000 people come to the Museum to explore Alberta's prehistory. Featuring more than 35 dinosaur skeletons and life-like models, you can come face to face with some of the most fascinating creatures Earth has ever known.

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    If you are into Dinosaurs and...

    by Rice_Paper Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you are into Dinosaurs and all things related, stop by at the internationally recognized Royal Tyrell (Palaeontology) Museum in Drumheller.
    World's largest display of complete dinosaur skeletons.

    One of the many fossils found at the museum.
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

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    Visit the Badlands

    by GrumpyDiver Updated Oct 20, 2010

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    Just across the way from the Royal Tyrrell Museum is a 1 km walk through the badlands. Following a clearly marked path, you can see this unique landscape from closeup.

    The lighting gets really interesting at sunset.

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    ROSEDALE SUSPENSION BRIDGE

    by balhannah Written Sep 1, 2010

    Rosedale, and its Suspension Bridge, we came across when following the Hoodoo trail to the Hoodoo's.
    The Bridge is historic, and you can walk across it, which we did.
    It was once used by miners but is now used for fishing and to accessing more interesting area's of the Badlands.

    Rosedale Suspension Bridge
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    THE HOODOO'S

    by balhannah Written Sep 1, 2010

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    Hoodoos, I just love looking at all the amazing shapes that have taken form over millions of years. They are so interesting, and great fun to explore!

    The name "Hoodoo" comes from the word "voodoo" and was given to these geological formations by the Europeans.

    In the Blackfoot and Cree traditions, the Hoodoos are believed to be petrified giants who come alive at night to hurl rocks at intruder's.

    These sandstone pillar's rest on a thick base of shale, and are capped by a large stone. Hoodoos are very fragile and can erode completely if their capstone is dislodged, so heed the signs, and keep to the tracks. As you can see in my photo, they are quite tall.
    This is a good area to view the hoodoo's close up, but you will find hoodoos everywhere!

    The drive along Highway 10 South is known as Hoodoo Trail for that very reason!

    The Hoodoo's
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