Athabasca Falls, Jasper National Park

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  • Part of the Gorge
    Part of the Gorge
    by RavensWing
  • Where the Water Calms Down
    Where the Water Calms Down
    by RavensWing
  • Athabasca falls
    Athabasca falls
    by Twan
  • RavensWing's Profile Photo

    Blue Ice

    by RavensWing Updated Nov 21, 2013

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    Where the Water Calms Down
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    The Athabasca Falls are breathtaking in both the summer and early spring. In the summer you can see the rainbow in the spray of the water as it courses through the gorge. In the early spring the ice almost looks blue. There are paved paths for you to walk around. It's not exactly stroller friendly because there are areas where there are stairs to get to the different viewpoints.

    A Word of Warning!!
    Every couple of years someone dies at Athabasca Falls. Park staff search for and rescue people who fall into the canyon. Usually only the bodies are found.
    Step off the trail and you risk your life! The rocks, covered by spray year round are as slippery as ice. Within minutes of slipping into the water hypothermia takes over - you cannot pull yourself out of the river. Once over the falls death is swift.
    Stay on the trail!

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  • Ann75's Profile Photo

    The powerfull Athabasca Falls

    by Ann75 Written Aug 27, 2013

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    Close up view of the Athabasca Falls
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    The Athabasca Falls in Jasper National Park is not the highest or the widest waterfall in the Canadian Rockies but it must be the most powerful. The full width of the Athabasca River is funneled into a three metre gap and over the brink of the falls. Athabasca Falls is actually one of the major tourist stops along the Icefield Parkway and is a very busy place during the summer months. To avoid the crowds it is best to visit earlier in the morning or later in the afternoon and even after dinner time. Most of the trail system is paved but stairs limit access for people in wheelchairs. There is a wonderful picnic area with ten picnic tables, kitchen shelter and washrooms.

    From the parking lot it is a short walk past the washrooms to the trail next to the river. The picnic area is to the left and the falls are to the right. There are viewpoints to take in the waterfall from both sides of the river, including the bridge that spans the canyon downstream of the cataract. Over time the waterfall has moved back and forth in it's search for the path of least resistance, cutting and abandoning channels as it goes. One such channel has been developed with stairs and trail for easy exploration. It also gives access to viewpoints at the bottom of the main canyon and to the river bank beyond.

    The vast majority of people who visit Athabasca Falls do not give it enough time. They rush to the falls, snap a picture and they're gone. But if you do have a bit more time, do xplore the area looking for signs of abandoned waterfalls and other water worn rock. Stand in the spray at the closest viewpoint, or just hang out and enjoy the view. Follow the trail down to the river and back, it's an easy walk (including some stairs) with wonderful views.

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  • Twan's Profile Photo

    Athabasca falls

    by Twan Written Mar 11, 2012

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    Athabasca falls
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    Athabasca is a waterfall in Jasper National Park in Alberta, Canada. It is a 5-class waterfall with a fall of 23 meters and a width of 18 meters.

    The waterfall is best known not to have seen this level is relatively low, however, the power of the large amount of water in the stream falls down, even on such a cold morning in the autumn.

    A layer of hard quartzite caused the waterfall in a softer layer underneath could erode limestone, creating a short neck with a large number of holes is created. There is often whitewater below the waterfall that goes into the Athabasca River to the place Jasper.

    The waterfall is easily accessible from the Icefields Parkway (Highway 93) between the towns of Banff and Jasper.

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Athabasca Falls

    by spidermiss Updated Apr 12, 2011

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    Athabasca Falls, Jasper National Park
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    The falls are situated in Jasper National Park and on the Upper Athabasca River. The falls are approximately 23 metres high but are more renowned for their force than their height. There are various walking trails and viewing platforms where you can enjoy the falls and also take photographs. When I last visited Athabasca Falls, I witnessed a rainbow over them and this was one amazing sight!

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  • 807Wheaton's Profile Photo

    Enjoy the Athabasca Falls

    by 807Wheaton Updated Mar 26, 2009

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    Athabasca Falls
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    After we left the Columbia Ice Fields area, we continued on Highway 93 north to Jasper. Before entering Jasper National Park, we stopped to see the Athabasca Falls. They were easy to access and we were totally amazed by the beautiful blue color that we had seen earlier in Lake Louise.

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  • Hanau93's Profile Photo

    My favourite Falls-Athabasca Falls

    by Hanau93 Updated Nov 18, 2008

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    The Falls
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    Just like the SUNWAPTA FALLS the Athabasca Falls originally get their water from the Columbia Icefields.The Falls are classified as a 6 waterfall, with a drop of 60 ft (18 m) and a width of 30 ft (9.1 m).At certain points you can get sprayed as this is how powerful they are. Pouring over a layer of hard quartzite, the falls have cut into the softer limestone beneath, carving intricate features, including potholes and a short canyon and then continue to flow into the Athabasca river again.I found the canyon quite dramatic and then the cliff where they flow into the river again.i could have stayed at the spot forever..There is also a walk down to the river but since it was getting colder we opted not to do so this time..

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  • vtveen's Profile Photo

    ...powerful

    by vtveen Updated Mar 19, 2007

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    powerful falls

    The Athabasca Falls were our second stop, driving the Icefields Parkway from Jasper to Banff. They are situated about 30 km south of Jasper, just where Highways 93 and 93a join. There is a big car park and during our visit it was almost full. Perhaps it is better to be as early as possible to avoid the crowds.

    Through walkways and platforms you can get a good impression of the power of these falls. Although they are just 23 m. high, there is coming down an impressive amount of water through a narrow canyon.
    Looking on my map I suppose the water is coming all the way from the Athabasca Glacier (Columbia Icefield).

    The falls are so powerful that you have the feeling it is raining, although the sun is shining. There is constant mist around the pathways and you have to protect your camera from getting wet.

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  • david1982's Profile Photo

    Glacier madness

    by david1982 Written Jan 27, 2007

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    Nothing spectacular if you've seen a glacier before, but great all the same. It's a bit of a tourist trap (Japanese EVERYWHERE) and the Snocoaches are generally packed with a long queue.

    One great view is from the Icefields centre, where you can see exactly how far the glacier has retreated over time (used to cover the current road and car park).

    I did the steep walk up to the foot of the glacier which is surprisingly wide up close.

    Watch out for ravens, they are EVERYWHERE!

    The Icefields Centre is a bit of a tourist trap too....with loads of interactive displays for kids etc (half of which don't work) complete with lots of info about glacier formation etc which is interesting.

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  • Redlats's Profile Photo

    Mount Kerkeslin

    by Redlats Updated Oct 12, 2006

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    Mount Kerkeslin

    Athabasca Falls sits at the junction of Highway 93 and 93A at the foot of Mount Kerkeslin. In mid September when we visited last, there had just been a snowfall to give the mountain top a skiff of snow!

    You can see the banks of the Athabasca River in the foreground of the picture. This photo is take from behind the falls.

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  • Redlats's Profile Photo

    Below the falls

    by Redlats Updated Oct 12, 2006

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    Abandoned channel
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    If you wander the trails beyond the falls viewpoints, you can actually walk through an abandoned channel (where the river flowed thousands of years ago) and see the lake (2nd photo) at the bottom of the falls.

    The advantage of coming here (especially during prime time) is that the people on the tour buses don't have time to come down here, so there are fewer tourists.

    I didn't capture it well enough in a photo, but you could walk all the way down to the edge of the water where many people had build iglulaks (is that the correct term?) using rocks that have been piled there by the Athabasca River during higher flows. Next time I will have a zoom lens and get the picture.

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  • Redlats's Profile Photo

    Wander the trails around the falls

    by Redlats Updated Oct 12, 2006

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    closeup of one of the channels
    4 more images

    This is a special place. A lot of water flowing down the Athabasca River (coming from the glaciers of the Columbia Icefield) dropping a total height of 23 metres. The viewpoint is just off the highway. My first two photos were taken in September, which means the water is low compared to spring and summer when runoff is at it's peak.

    You can wander around the paved trails (map is in my 3rd photo) and see it from many views - channels cut through the limestone where water used to flow - circles ground into the limestone where a rock acted as a drill and the falls as the power - a beautiful blue lake at the the bottom (a distinct blue, bluer than Lake Louise, perhaps similar to Peyto Lake).

    It is crowded. Every tour bus (photo 5) that travels the Jasper-Banff parkway stops at Athabasca Falls. Every person on every bus makes it to the first stop, perhaps half of them make it to the viewpoints on the other side, and perhaps half of them follow the pathways down the abandoned channels to see the lake below the falls. Spend the extra time and follow the paths through the old river channel.

    Interestingly when we were last here in 2002, there were paper signs pasted everywhere asking people to look for the body of Roger Wilgenbusch who had fallen into the river and not been recovered yet. That possibility of happening to you was enough to keep you on the pathways. When we returned in 2006, there was a plaque (photo 4) on one of the benches about him.

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  • Hermanater's Profile Photo

    Take in the Falls

    by Hermanater Updated Jul 19, 2006

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    Along the Icefield hiway there are numerous stops for sight seeing. A few of these are waterfalls. We love waterfalls and stop every chance we get. This one is located along the highway so it is not out of the way. Makes for a nice break from travelling. It is vary popular so there is always a lot of people around.

    Athabasca Falls is not the highest or the widest waterfall in the Canadian Rockies but it is the most powerful. The full width of the Athabasca River is funneled into a three metre gap and over the brink of the falls.

    The water goes through a narrow gorge where the walls have been smoothed by the force of the water. The water left many potholes behind.

    There are picnic sites and cross country ski trails.

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  • kymbanm's Profile Photo

    Athabasca Falls - Lower Canyon

    by kymbanm Written Aug 31, 2005

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    Steps to Lower Canyon

    Despite the crowds, the diversion to the falls is worth it, those visitor center folks were so right! But in order to trully feel this place, you have to wander beyond the initial viewpoints near the falls and parking lots. You have to follow the paths away from the people .... to the lower canyon and the beach (yes, I did say beach).

    The steps to the lower canyon are steep, but well maintained ... this route is actually a former waterway from the falls ... worn down over time by the force fo water ...... eventually, the river found another route, and the falls took on their current path ..... for me, walking through the narrow, steep, rock canyon was a highlight ...... it's hard to describe how this walk made me feel (besides winded) ... the path also decends down to a beach ..... ah, much fewer fellow tourists down here ... tee-hee ... perfect!

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  • kymbanm's Profile Photo

    Here, with EVERYONE else in the park :)

    by kymbanm Written Aug 31, 2005

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    Athabasca Falls

    I was told that I HAD to see Athabasca Falls, despite the fact it would be crowded ... and crowded it was!

    So here is the requisite photo of the falls ... but the real treat will come later ,in the lower canyon ....

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Athabasca Falls

    by Jefie Written May 4, 2005

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    Athabasca Falls, Jasper National Park

    Athabasca Falls is another great place to stop for a short, pleasurable walk in Jasper National Park. The falls are 23 m high, which is not very high by Canadian Rockies standards, but the size of the river, which flows from the glaciers of the Columbia Icefield, makes the falls quite powerful and very impressive.

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