Waterton Lakes National Park Off The Beaten Path

  • View from the top
    View from the top
    by Camping_Girl
  • The Visitor Centre, built into the hill
    The Visitor Centre, built into the hill
    by Camping_Girl
  • The jump - hiking path down below
    The jump - hiking path down below
    by Camping_Girl

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Waterton Lakes National Park

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    Twin Butte General Store

    by Camping_Girl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Twin Butte General Store
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    This little store is located about 25 km north of Waterton Park, on highway #6 (about midway between Waterton and Pincher Creek), in the little town of Twin Butte.

    In addition to being a general store that sells sundries, camping supplies, souvenirs & ice cream, they also have a liquor store, post office and a lounge/restaurant. They have live music sometimes on the weekends.

    This place serves up absolutely phenomenal mexican dishes as well as other traditional menu items. The food is great and the atmosphere is great. You will be greeted with genuine warmth when you walk in. We love this place, and stop in often.

    The food is great and the prices are reasonable.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip
    • Motorcycle

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    Carthew summit

    by hannahmaymoore Written Dec 7, 2006
    crystal clear morning reflection on Cameron Lake

    Most park visitors never see the true wilderness that the Glacier-Waterton International Peace Park was created to preserve. To experience the raw beauty of the park I suggest at least a few summits. The Carthew summit is the one of the easiest I attempted that summer and would be a good starting point for a first summit experience. It is very difficult to get lost since you always have the view of the trail below you.
    Take the trail beginning at Cameron Lake for about 4 miles. As you approach the pass between Alderson & Carthew peaks, you will se about a mile ahead the trail switchbacking up a large scree field. Before you begin the descent toward the scree field, leave the trail and climb up through the small trees to the ridge. Then procede westward toward the summit along the ridge. The drop off to the right is very large and affords impressive views. The ridgewalk is quite gradual. Once on the summit it is a short scree run down to the pass to rejoin the trail again. I recommend continuing toward Waterton rather than return to Cameron Lake. The little lakes along the trail are spectacular and it is all down hill. =)

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    • Mountain Climbing
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Great Canadian Barn Dance

    by Camping_Girl Updated Mar 4, 2006

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    This is an old-fashioned barn dance in a big red barn. It is a great family activity. The dinner and dance package comes with a carved roast beef dinner with all the trimmings, horse-drawn hay rides, dance lessons & of course the dance. This runs from May through September each year.

    Prices are: Adults $19.50, Youth $16.00 and children under 9 are $6.50.

    They also have some live performances, which include dinner, throughout the summer. And from what I understand there is also a special Cowboy Christmas live performance in December, which includes dinner as well.

    There is an RV & tenting campground onsite, as well as a cabin for rent and a B&B.

    They are located about 25 miles northeast of Waterton park - here's the exact directions:

    >>>>>>>>From Waterton Park - 11 miles East on Hwy.#5, 13 miles North on Hwy. #800 then 1 mile East on Hwy. #505 and 1.5 miles North on Wynder (gravel) road.

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    • Seniors
    • Farm Stay

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    Rafting

    by Camping_Girl Updated Mar 2, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kimball River Sports near Cardston offers beginner and intermediate whitewater rafting, guided fishing tours and fun tubing. They also rent equipment.

    They are located just south of Cardston, about a 45 minute drive from Waterton park. They are about the same distance from St Mary's, at Glacier National Park.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Rafting

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    Frank Slide

    by Camping_Girl Written Mar 1, 2006

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    What remains of Turtle Mountain
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    In the early morning of April 29, 1903, the side of Turtle Mountain collapsed, partially burying the tiny town of Frank, as its inhabitants lay sleeping. About 70 people were killed. In about a minute and a half, the rockslide covered just over one square mile of ground about 500 feet deep.

    The interpretive centre discusses the slide, how and why it happened, and also teaches an understanding of the coal-mining way of life. A trail outside allows you to walk around the slide area. From the observation deck outside, you can view Turtle Mountain and observe the part of the mountain that fell.

    Frank is located in the historic Crowsnest Pass, about a 45 minute drive north and west of Waterton, on highway #3

    Hours of Operation:

    Open year-round
    May 15 - September 14
    9:00am - 6:00pm

    September 15 - May 14
    10:00am - 5:00pm

    Closed: Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Years Day & Easter Sunday.

    Rates
    Adults $6.50
    Seniors $5.50
    Family (2 adults accompanying youth) $15.00
    Youth 7-17 $3.00
    Under 7 Free

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump

    by Camping_Girl Written Mar 1, 2006

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    The Visitor Centre, built into the hill
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    The Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump is a testimony to a custom practiced by native people of the North American plains for thousands of years, prior to the white man's coming to this continent. It is a spot where aboriginals ran buffalo over a cliff to their deaths. The dead buffalo were carved up for food and hides after the kill.

    This site has been designated as a UNESCO world heritage site, putting it in the same designation as Stonehenge and the Pyramids.

    There is an interpretive centre here which explains the life of the native people and how they prepared for their annual buffalo kill. A short video demonstrates their rituals. After you have worked your way through the five levels of the interpretive centre, a trail outside leads to the site where the buffalo were run over the cliff. You can also tour the grounds below the cliff.

    It is a great place to increase your awareness of aboriginal people and their way of life. A gift shop offers gifts and souvenirs of aboriginal design.

    You should plan to spend two to four hours here. Just watch out for the cafeteria: their prices are outrageous! When we go there, we bring a lunch and eat at the picnic tables, in front of the building.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
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    Remington Carriage Museum

    by Camping_Girl Written Mar 1, 2006

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    This museum is located in Cardston, Alberta, about a 30 minute drive east of Waterton. The museum houses the largest collection of horse-drawn carts in North America. They have over 250 carts on display. The facility features video displays, a fire hall, a carriage factory, a restoration shop, a working stable, carriage rides, carriage rentals, a restaurant and a gift shop.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Seniors

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    All the hiking you can take!

    by jojocan Updated May 17, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Want to climb this mountain?

    There are hundreds of walking paths around Waterton, and they are all beautiful! You can find trails by following the maps located at all the day use area locations. Most of them give a difficulty level too.

    If you pick up a Waterton tour book at any of the stores in town, it will show you where to go to start your hike.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Backpacking

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    Relaxing at night

    by jojocan Written Feb 5, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are some lovely beaches at Waterton, but none that have sand. (Its in the mountains people!). If you walk along the edge of the water, there is so much to see and take in. Considering how close you are to town, its so peaceful. You can lay on the beach all night and look at the stars and skip rocks!

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    • National/State Park

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    The Crowsnest Pass.

    by K.Knight Written Jul 15, 2004

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    The slide.

    Coleman, and the Crowsnest Pass are little less than a 1 hour drive north of Waterton National Park. In "The Pass" you will find the town of Frank and the "Frank slide interpretive centre."
    On April 29, 1903, at 4:10 a.m., Turtle Mountain collapsed, resulting in the greatest landslide in North American history. In 100 seconds: at least 76 people were buried alive under tons of massive limestone boulders; three-quarters of the homes in Frank were crushed; over a mile of the Canadian Pacific Railroad was completely destroyed; and a river became a lake
    The centre is open from 9am until 6pm, costs 6.50 per person and offers a viewing platform, audio-visual presentations, guided walks, slide shows, and demonstrations.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

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    Kootenai Brown's Grave Site

    by minorzwarpath Written Apr 20, 2003

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    Roughtly halfway between the townstite of Waterton and the park's entrance, a small pullout at the side of the road is marked as the trailhead. For anyone with an interest in Southern Alberta history, books on George "Kootenai" Brown are available in many gift shops. This site is a particularly interesting stop if you've already visited the Kootenai Brown Museum in the nearby town of Pincher Creek.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel

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    Drive/Hike to Red Rock Canyon/Waterton

    by spartan Written Feb 25, 2003

    The 16 kilometer (10 miles) drive to Red Rock Canyon provides the traveler with colorful roadside wildflowers, views of hanging valleys, alpine meadows, and jagged mountain peaks as well as a special glimpse of the brown bear. Arriving at the canyon, you will be rewarded with the striking colors of the bedrock layers. The layers of red and green colored minerals offer a brilliant contrast to each other and the lush surroundings. A short self-guided hike explains some of the ancient history of mountainous native civilizations, as well as the unique formation of Red Rock Canyon.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Drive/Hike to Cameron Lake

    by spartan Written Feb 25, 2003
    Mountains, lake and snow

    At the end of a 16 km (10 mile) scenic highway known as the Akamina Parkway (out of the Waterton townsite), is Cameron Lake. Nestled between the majestic mountain peaks of the Akamina Ridge, this sub-alpine lake is one of many bodies of water that makes up Waterton Lakes National Park. Cameron Lake is a great place to rent a canoe, hike along the shore and see grizzlies on the far slopes.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    Elk viewing in the fall

    by grouse Written Mar 27, 2005

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    If you happen to be in Waterton Lakes by the end of August/beginning of September, don't forget to look at the elk.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

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Waterton Lakes National Park Off The Beaten Path

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