Kootenay National Park Local Customs

  • female moose
    female moose
    by zrim
  • blend in with the hillside, don't they
    blend in with the hillside, don't they
    by zrim
  • a young buck lazing about
    a young buck lazing about
    by zrim

Most Recent Local Customs in Kootenay National Park

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    Moose

    by zrim Written Jul 16, 2003

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    female moose

    We saw a female moose, but as soon as she caught sight of us she bolted into the brush and therefore I could not get a photo. I'm sort of glad she did that because we saw far too many animals in the Canadian parks that have become accustomed to people. Wild animals should be wild and should be skittish around people. (This photo comes from my Denali trip in 2001.)

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    same buck zoomed

    by zrim Updated Jul 14, 2003

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    Hey there Mr. Buck

    I didn't get all that close to the buck, but my zoom lense brought him in nicely. Even so, I twisted my ankle twice as I was busy trying to frame the buck in my camera sights.

    This was along the deserted trail to Dog Lake. Nice camping grounds. A picnic area. But not a human or evidence of a camper in sight. Maybe the voracious mosquitos had something to do with that (I think they also contributed to my ankle sprains).

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    A buck laying low

    by zrim Written Jul 14, 2003

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    a young buck lazing about

    The deer were actually more skittish than the elk, bighorn sheep or bears. Skittishness is a good thing in a wild animal. They should not feel comfortable around people. People and wild animals are not meant to be friends. Animals are to be admired, yes--but they should be free to remain independent and wild.

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    Molting Sheep

    by zrim Written Jul 14, 2003

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    baa baa brown sheep

    This sheep is almost down to its summer coat. The summers are quite lovely and cool at the upper latitudes and high altitudes found in Kootenay. But those winters can be harsh. The sheep need a nice thick coat to protect them through the winter. And there are no shearers in the wild, so they lose their coats naturally through the molting process.

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    Bighorn Sheep

    by zrim Written Jul 14, 2003

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    blend in with the hillside, don't they

    Bighorn Sheep are one of the high mountain mammals that are frequently spotted in a mountain park such as Kootenay. During the summer months, it is much easier to spot ewes and kids foraging among some of the more accessable trails and roads than it is to see the impressive males. The males spend the summer months at high altitudes and many times are only spotted by the most intrepid of travelers. On this trip we did not catch sight of any males complete with their impressive battering ram horns. However, if you are interested, my Glacier page shows some very cool males that were lazing on the trail in early September.

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Kootenay National Park Local Customs

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