Kootenay National Park Off The Beaten Path

  • Mountain Blue-Eyed-Grass
    Mountain Blue-Eyed-Grass
    by zrim
  • a sunburst of daisies
    a sunburst of daisies
    by zrim
  • Labrador Tea
    Labrador Tea
    by zrim

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Kootenay National Park

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    Fireweed

    by zrim Updated Jul 16, 2003

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    Fireweed

    We did not find fireweed on the Fireweed Trail. I suspect that it was still too early in the season at that high altitude. However, we did find fireweed in the Kootenay Valley off of the Simpson's River Trail. Fireweed gets its name because it is one of the first plants that springs to life in the aftermath of a burn. Fireweed even appeared in London a year after bombings in World War II. Like many other wildflowers, fireweed is edible and can be brewed into a tea.

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    Flora: take some time to look down as well as up

    by zrim Updated Jul 14, 2003

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    Build me up buttercup

    The mountain vistas are magnificant--of that, there can be no doubt. But the meadows and woodland also provide a splendid habitat for wildflowers of all shapes, sizes and colors. This photo portrays the Shrubby Cinquefoil.

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    Mountain Blue-Eyed-Grass

    by zrim Written Jul 14, 2003

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    Mountain Blue-Eyed-Grass

    A delicate little thing indeed. But the medicinal qualities are most potent. For instance, if you should have intestinal worms--try brewing up a pot of Mountain Blue-Eyed-Grass tea. That should expel those nasty critters.

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    Labrador Tea

    by zrim Written Jul 14, 2003

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    Labrador Tea

    Surprisingly the Labrador Tea is not a wildflower but an evergreen shrub! No matter, it is still one of the prettiest flowering plants in the forest. As implied by the name, Labrador Tea can be brewed and steeped to make a drinkable tea. However, excessive amounts cause drowsiness and may stimulate urination (I've not known a liquid when taken in excessive amounts that did not stimulate urination).

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    An array of wood lilies

    by zrim Written Jul 13, 2003

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    wood lilies

    One neat aspect of the new camera is the ability to focus on a close object while the remainder of the field is blurred like an impressionist painting. I thought that this lily pasture would be a good spot to try this type of photograph. I think it turned out pretty well (although it is difficult to see what I mean with the small VT scale photos.)

    Wood lily roots have medicinal uses as treatment for stomach ailments, coughs and even as a salve for open wounds.

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    Yellow Sweet-Vetch

    by zrim Written Jul 13, 2003

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    Yellow Sweet-Vetch

    A pretty perennial found in shady mounatin spots from Wyoming to Alberta and BC.

    I started photographing wildflowers on this trip for the first time because I finally have a camera that is versatile enough to take photos in the shade as well as bright light and that can focus on close-up objects as well as distant landscapes. I had a lot of fun seeking out different types of wildflowers

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    Woolly or Western Groundsel

    by zrim Updated Jul 16, 2003

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    a groundsel of some variety

    These little guys are tiny flowers with heads measuring about 15 milimeters. Groundsels are sometimes referred to as butterweeds.

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    Please don't eat the daisies

    by zrim Written Jul 13, 2003

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    a sunburst of daisies

    I suppose daisies are common just about everywhere, but it was still a photographical sight to come upon a field of wild daisies sprouting up hither and yon without being reigned in by a gardner.

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Kootenay National Park Off The Beaten Path

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