Stanley Park, Vancouver

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  • Third Beach - Stanley Park
    Third Beach - Stanley Park
    by IreneMcKay
  • Stanley Park - Trees
    Stanley Park - Trees
    by IreneMcKay
  • Lost Lagoon - Stanley Park
    Lost Lagoon - Stanley Park
    by IreneMcKay
  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    HORSE DRAWN TOURS @ STANLEY PARK

    by balhannah Written May 16, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I was very disappointed that we ran out of time to take the Horse Drawn tour of Stanley park.
    The cost of this tour was included in our Vancouver card, which we had purchased for sightseeing in Vancouver.

    We saw it, and passed it in Stanley park, what a great way to get around and to see the sites, clip, clop, clip, clop, a nice slow pace, and ideal for taking many photo's without any glare, as it is open air.

    A guide fully narrates the tour which passes byDeadman's Island, Vancouver's Harbour, Lions Gate Bridge, a Coastal Red Cedar Forest, and includes stops at the Totem Poles, the Girl in a Wet Suit Statue, the S.S. Empress of Japan Figurehead, and the Rose Garden.

    Tickets available only at the Horse-Drawn Tour Kiosk in Stanley Park.

    Only seating for 20 people.
    Departs every 30mins.
    Cost in 2010......$28.99 Adults....$15.99 .....children [3-12yr old]

    Fondest memory: http://www.stanleyparktours.com/

    Horse drawn tours going around Stanley Park
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    Stanley Park

    by Carmanah Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you only have a few hours in Vancouver and you don't know what to do, you HAVE to visit Stanley Park. This is Vancouver's "jewel" - Vancouver's pride and joy. A park unlike any other. If you can only see one thing in Vancouver, this is it.
    Stanley Park is 1000 acres of forest and gardens, surrounded by a 5.5 mile long seawall and miles of beach. It's one of the largest urban parks in North America, and has gorgeous views where ever you go! You can literally spend days in this park and still discover new areas. Stanley Park is technically a peninsula on the north-west tip of downtown. Three quarters of the park is surrounded by water, which gives the park its many beaches. The park consists of second-growth forest (forest that had once been logged in the late 1800's - but you wouldn't know!). It's a little piece of wilderness in downtown, complete with lakes, streams, wildlife (like raccoons, squirrels, porcupines, skunks), and lots of lush green vegetataion. If wilderness isn't your thing, there are also many manicured gardens throughout the park, such as Lost Lagoon, the Rhododendron gardens, the Rose Garden, Brockton Point, Prospect Point, Second Beach, Third Beach, and the totem poles. Even Lumberman's Arch is a great place to drop by for a great view of the Lions Gate Bridge, and perhaps a quick peak into the public viewing spots at the Vancouver Aquarium. Bring your camera and a good pair of walking shoes (ie: not high heels or anything that can be ruined if it gets wet or dirty!) - you'll never stop taking pictures, and you'll never stop walking!

    Stanley Park's wilderness in 1998
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    Vancouver

    by Greybilby Updated Mar 18, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: archeological evidence has it, Vancouver had settllements of coastal Indians in the year 500 B.C.

    Fondest memory: the many scenic locations in and around Vancouver makes this City a memorable stay. I personally enjoyed the beautiful Parks, 180 Parks in the City alone.
    the world famous Stanley Park has so much recreational value and is appreciated by tourist and the locals. an area of over 400 hectares operated by the Stanley Park Ecology Society.
    the Park is also well known for the Lost Lagoon, a Bird Sanctuary

    looking down on Stanley Park view over  English Bay
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    • Birdwatching
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Arts and Culture

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  • duanestorey's Profile Photo

    Explore Nature

    by duanestorey Written Apr 12, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Stanley park, located near downtown Vancouver, is a great plcae to spend the day relaxing. If you like biking, rollerblading, or just walking through nature, then head down to Stanley Park.

    Fondest memory: Hanging out with some friends in Stanley Park.

    Stanley Park is the wooded area to the left in the picture. If you look closely, you can see the Lion's Gate suspension bridge as well.

    Stanley Park

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  • Carmanah's Profile Photo

    Stanley Park

    by Carmanah Updated Jun 18, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Stanley Park is Vancouver's pride and joy. It's the epitome of Vancouver and one of the most beautiful urban parks in possibly the world!

    Basically, Stanley Park is a 1000 acre forest, but it's located in downtown Vancouver. Within a matter of minutes you can walk from the downtown core of Vancouver into a peaceful forested park - and the trees are huge! The easily accessable feel of wilderness is half the beauty of Stanley Park. It's literally right at the doorstep of the downtown bustle.

    Here you can enjoy the tranquilness of the forested trails, or the quaint beauty of the rose gardens, or you can enjoy live theatre at the open-air concert bowl "Theatre Under the Stars". Or take the seawall around and explore the beaches. Stroll along Lost Lagoon and admire the birds, or go hike to Prospect Point and enjoy the views!

    You can spend an entire day at Stanley Park and still not see anything!

    Standing in Stanley Park - March 9, 2002
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Birdwatching
    • Beaches

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    Lost Lagoon

    by Carmanah Updated Jun 21, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Lost Lagoon is a lake at the entrance to Stanley Park, perhaps familiar to some by the works of Canadian poet Pauline Johnson. Lost Lagoon is home to many species of waterfowl, like ducks, swans, geese, etc - almost like a bird sanctuary, full of safe dwellings for the birds to raise their young. Back a century ago, the lake used to be connected to the ocean through an underground channel, so when the tide went out, so did all the water, hence "Lost" Lagoon. The channel has since been blocked, and the water level of Lost Lagoon no longer changes.

    Walk around the trails and feed the birds at Lost Lagoon in Stanley Park! If you come at dusk, you might be lucky enough to spot the bats hunting around the skies for insects.

    Children feeding birds at Lost Lagoon in March 02
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  • tvdm's Profile Photo

    Stanley Park

    by tvdm Written Sep 12, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Visit Stanley Park and all its attractions. The totems (pic), aquarium, beaches, hiking trails, it's all great for a fun-filled afternoon!

    Fondest memory: What's best about Vancouver is the city bustle in a sizable package. You'll find the best shops, the coolest bars and clubs and the most beautiful sights all closeby. Add the mild climate and gorgeous mountain backdrops and you won't want to leave. Unfortunately, I had to...

    Totems in the Park

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Hollow Tree - Stanley Park

    by IreneMcKay Written Apr 11, 2015

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This is where I annoyed my husband because I insisted we doubled back into the park's interior to find the hollow tree after we left Third Beach. Yet more walking. I must admit our feet were getting a little sore by this point.

    Hollow tree is around 700 to 800 year old. It is a Western Red Cedar tree stump. Around the bottom of it there are old photos showing people posing inside it, a car inside it and even an elephant inside it.

    Hollow tree was badly damaged by the severe windstorm in December 2006 and was to be removed but a campaign to preserve it prevented it being destroyed.

    Hollow  Tree - Stanley Park Hollow  Tree - Stanley Park Hollow  Tree - Stanley Park Hollow  Tree - Stanley Park
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    More cool Canadian critters!

    by worldkiwi Written Aug 5, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: One motive for my walk through Stanley Park was to see racoons. Some locals I spoke to in Vancouver couldn't quite fathom the enthusiasm I had to see these critters. I guess to Canadians racoons aren't anything special - a bit like possums in New Zealand. However, we don't have many large land animals in my country (no native ones anyway) and racoons have been creatures of stories that I grew up with. Heck, I remember as a primary school kid writing a story about a group of North American animals setting out on a round the world adventure - and the only racoons I had ever seen were in Auckland Zoo!
    Well, I had a map of Stanley Park and made for Racoon Trail, where I hoped to spot these animals. All I saw there were black squirrels! Disappointed and giving up hope, I walked up to Prospect Point to photograph the bridge and the view. It was here that I came across racoons! They didn't stick around very long, but obviously knew the best place to hang out to get some morsels of food! The one pictured was having a drink from a water fountain. It was a shame they got frightened off by some noisy kids. I would like to have watched them a bit longer.

    Racoon at Prospect Park, Stanley Park.
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    Stanley Park - Totem Poles

    by IreneMcKay Updated Apr 11, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Stanley Park is home to some wonderful First Nations totem poles. One of the highlights of the park for me. The totem poles are located at Brockton Point.

    Three gateways created by Coast Salish artist Susan Point lead to the totem poles. These beautiful gateways took three years to make and were installed in 2008.

    There are nine totem poles at Brockton Point. The first of these was purchased in 1920. Four of the totem poles are from Alert Bay on Vancouver Island; others are from the Queen Charlotte Islands and Rivers Inlet.

    Totem Pole Totem Poles Totem Poles Gateway Totem Pole
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    Siwash Rock - Stanley Park

    by IreneMcKay Written Apr 11, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: A first nations legend tells the story of a young chief who was brave, strong and upright in his traditions. He married a young girl from the north and they longed for a child. At last the girl got pregnant. When the child was due, they went swimming in order to purify their bodies in preparation for parenthood. The young girl returned to the shore to give birth, but the chief kept swimming. Four giants in a canoe approached him and demanded that he left the water and got out of their way, because they had magical powers and they would lose them if they came into too close contact with a human. The chief refused explaining that he was swimming for the purity of his coming child, so the giants turned him into a stone. The stone stands in the water at the top of Stanley park and represents clean fatherhood.

    Siwash Rock Siwash Rock Siwash Rock Siwash Rock
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    Lost Lagoon - Stanley Park

    by IreneMcKay Written Apr 11, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Lost Lagoon was originally part of Coal Harbour. At low tide it would turn into mud flats. The first nations people gathered seafood here. With the construction of the Stanley Park causeway in 1916 Lost Lagoon became permanently detached from the sea.

    The name Lost Lagoon comes from a poem written by Canadian writer Pauline Johnson. She had a Mohawk father and an English mother. She liked to sit lost in contemplation by this lagoon hence its name.

    The lagoon has a fountain in the middle. It is home to many species of birds. As we sat next to it we suddenly heard a soft but clear farting sound. I looked at my husband. He looked at me. The sound came again. To our surprise we realised it was the call of a strange little duck. We had to move away as there were people approaching and we did not want them to think the embarrassing sounds were us.

    After Lost Lagoon we finally left the beautiful Stanley Park.

    Lost Lagoon - Stanley Park Lost Lagoon - Stanley Park The offending duck Lost Lagoon - Stanley Park Lost Lagoon - Stanley Park
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    Second Beach - Stanley Park

    by IreneMcKay Written Apr 11, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Second Beach was a welcome sight because it meant we had almost finished walking right round the park. Like Third Beach, Second Beach is sandy. It is easier to get to than Third Beach so no doubt gets more crowded in summer. There is a large outdoor heated pool here, but it was not in operation when we visited. It was too cold. There are also toilets.

    Second Beach - Stanley Park Second Beach - Stanley Park Second Beach - Stanley Park
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    • Beaches
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Eating hot dogs at Third Beach in Stanley Park

    by Carmanah Updated Jul 31, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: A favourite activity of mine is to walk clockwise around part of Stanley Park along the seawall, starting at English Bay and ending up at Third Beach. It's at Third Beach where I climb the stairs to their scenic concession stand and order the usual: a smokie with cooked onions, mustard and relish. I then sit over by the public picnic tables and enjoy my well-deserved rest!

    While there are concession stands all over Stanley Park, such as at Lumberman's Arch, the Vancouver Aquarium, Prospect Point and Second Beach, the one at Third Beach is my favourite because it's at one of the quietest but most scenic spots in Stanley Park. While it takes more time to walk over to Third Beach (about a 20 minute walk further along the sea wall from Second Beach), it's almost practically less hectic than the others, guaranteeing you a peaceful, relaxing time.

    As well, at Third Beach you feel like you're miles away from the city because all that surrounds you are trees, the beach and the gentle sounds of the ocean.

    Eating hot dogs at Third Beach
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    World Famous Fish and Chips

    by meteorologist1 Updated Aug 5, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: It wasn't when I got to Vancouver that I discovered that they claim to have "world famous" fish and chips. You can see a lot of restaurants as well as concession stands selling fish and chips everywhere you go. I didn't try them though. Should have I? (This picture shows a concession stand in Stanley Park selling fish and chips.)

    Fish and Chips stand
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    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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