Unique Places in Vancouver

  • Lighthouse Park
    Lighthouse Park
    by IreneMcKay
  • Lighthouse Park
    Lighthouse Park
    by IreneMcKay
  • Lighthouse Park
    Lighthouse Park
    by IreneMcKay

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Vancouver

  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Roedde House Museum

    by IreneMcKay Updated Apr 17, 2015

    Roedde House is an old Victorian house located on Barclay Square in Vancouver's Westend. Barclay Square has lots of lovely old heritage buildings. This square has been beautifully restored.

    I originally had a visit to this museum down on our first full day itinerary, but we did not make it. It is only open from 1pm to 4pm Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Sunday. I moved it on to the next days itinerary, but we also did not make it. We eventually got there on our last full day, but way after it had closed so we only viewed it from the outside.

    Roedde House was built in 1893 for Gustav and Matilda Roedde. Gustav was Vancouver's first bookbinder. The house was designed by Francis Rattenbury.

    Gustav Roedde was born in 1860 in Thuringen, Germany. He trained as a bookbinder in Leipzig, but immigrated to the United States in 1881. In the States he met his wife to be Matilda Marie Cassebohm. She was originally from the island of Heligoland, Germany. The Roeddes moved several times before they settled in Vancouver. They had six children.
    .
    On Sundays you can tour Roedde House and have afternoon tea there.

    Entrance on Sunday is $8 including afternoon tea. On other days it is $5.

    Roedde House is located at 1415 Barclay Street. We got there by taking a number 5 bus along Robson Rd. We got off at Broughton Road, crossed the road, walked straight, then turned left, then left again.

    Roedde House Roedde House Other heritage buildings on the square.
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    Around Lonsdale Quay Continued

    by IreneMcKay Written Apr 16, 2015

    Around this area there was a marina, a naval monument, lots of First Nations monuments, houses built right on the waterfront and lovely views.

    While we were in the area the longest train I have ever seen passed by. It was a goods train and passed by for around 20 minutes before it was finally gone.

    Around Lonsdale Quay Around Lonsdale Quay Around Lonsdale Quay Around Lonsdale Quay Around Lonsdale Quay
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    Around Lonsdale Quay

    by IreneMcKay Written Apr 16, 2015

    We took a walk away from the shopping centre. If we were at Lonsdale Quay facing the sea, we went right. There was a very pleasant park, followed by a very pleasant marina. There were also great views towards the mountains.

    A gift from Korea in the park. Around Lonsdale Quay Around Lonsdale Quay Around Lonsdale Quay Around Lonsdale Quay
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    Lonsdale Quay

    by IreneMcKay Written Apr 16, 2015

    We arrived in Lonsdale Quay after we had visited Lynn Canyon Park. I thought there would only be a shopping centre, bus station and ferry terminal in that area, but we also took a walk to Lonsdale Park and Mosquito Creek and found this area to be very scenic and pleasant.

    Lonsdale Quay has a shopping centre with its own brewery, shops, a food court, restaurants. I actually really liked it. In fact I preferred it to Granville Market truth be told.

    Ship yards near Lonsdale Quay Brewery Lonsdale Quay Lonsdale Quay
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    Lighthouse Park

    by IreneMcKay Updated Apr 16, 2015

    We got to Lighthouse Park by taking bus 250 from Burrard Street. We asked the driver to let us know when to get off, which he did, but he also told us that we should get off at the stop when the bus electronic information system said Beacon Road.

    From the bus stop cross the road and keep going straight. It is only a couple of minutes walk to the park entrance. If you come by car there is a large carpark at the entrance.

    An information board at the park displayed a map showing walking routes in the park. There were also leaflets with maps to pick up.

    In Vancouver's early history a lot of its original forest was logged, but the Lighthouse Park area was not, so it is home to some of Vancouver's oldest trees.

    The walk to the lighthouse itself was easy and only took about ten minutes. We also explored a few short paths just off this route. Two went to viewpoints; one went to a beach which was also a viewpoint.

    If we had had longer I would have liked to do the walk of the giants which has the oldest and biggest trees in the park.

    Near the lighthouse there was a campsite with toilets, picnic tables.

    This is a pleasant place to spend a couple of hours. Some paths are harder than others and involve clambering over tree roots and rocks. The main path to the lighthouse itself was very easy.

    Lighthouse Park Lighthouse Park Lighthouse Park Lighthouse Park Lighthouse Park
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    St. Andrew's-Wesley Cathedral

    by briantravelman Updated Jul 14, 2014

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    This church was a nice little find. It was a nice surprise to see a church like this in the middle of downtown. It didn't really fit in with the modern day architecture.
    The church is built in a French Gothic Revival style, which is quite common in the U.S. and Canada. Construction of the church began in 1927 and was completed in 1933. It is still a work in progress, and there is a desire to restore the church to its original glory, as soon as they have the funds.
    Unfortunately it was closed, even though it was a Sunday, so we couldn't go inside.

    The church is located on the corner of Nelson and Burrard, just across from the building where they filmed, "X-Men United". It's not that had to miss, as it really stands out among the city's modern day sky scrapers.
    There is also a small Baptist church right next door, that is also nice, but I couldn't find any information on that one. I think that one is newer.

    Me and my cousin accidentally mistook this church for the Holy Rosary Cathedral, which we intended on visiting, instead. It is the only church I knew about in Vancouver, so we saw this one, and thought it was it. It turns out, the Holy Rosary is in a completely different area. Too bad, that one is a much older, more beautiful, and more important church, but this one was also nice, and virtually unknown to tourists. A nice little surprise in the middle of downtown.
    Really off the beaten path.
    I just wish they would trim those trees, so you can see the cathedral, in all its glory.

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    • Architecture

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    Christ Church Cathedral

    by briantravelman Written Jul 12, 2014

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    This church was a really nice surprise. This lovely Anglican church, really stands out among the modern day sky scrapers, and I was really surprised to find a church like this, in the middle of downtown.
    Construction of the church began in 1889, and after several setbacks, it was finally completed in 1894.
    Expansions on the church were completed in 1909.
    One of the most unique features of these church, was its organ, which was actually operated by a human blower, who was paid $5 a month. By 1911, the organ had worn out, was replaced with a new one.
    In 1971 the church membership voted to demolish the building and replace it with a hi-rise tower complex. This redevelopment was opposed by the public, and in 1976 after much lobbying, the cathedral was designated a Class A Heritage building. The church still conducts services today.

    I had no idea this church was here, but was shown it by my cousin. The church is located at 690 Burrard Street, right across from Hotel Vancouver, and really stands out among the modern day sky scrapers, so it's not that hard to miss.
    We were there on a Sunday, and the church was closed, but that's okay, because from the pictures I've seen of the inside, it's not too impressive. The outside is worth seeing though.

    Christ Church Cathedral Anglican Cathedral Nice Church
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    Vancouver has high flyers in Forbes lists

    by kenHuocj Written Nov 3, 2013

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    I had hear of a self made man called Pattison, all our Bill Board and Bus stop adverts are his company's handiwork,
    we also have a Lululemon Shop and when they have a special one day Outlet sale, the health/yoga outdoor orientated go coo cooH, but when you need another piece of electronica, it's Future Shop which was sold to Best Buy, London Drugs are into their 3rd and 4th generation.
    Golfing Brothers, Dragon Boater, ex Deputy Governor, Migrants from Africa, Asia, SE Asia and Persia
    There are many more notables in this city that once housed the Vancouver Venture Capital Market, and we need to keep i mind, shipping, forestry and mining are part and parcel of this city dominated by immigrants since the late 60's, how different it was when this was the city was for retiring senior across Canada.

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    Traboulay PoCo Trail

    by Ann75 Written Jan 29, 2013

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    The Traboulay Poco Trail is a 25 km ( approx. 16 miles) walking and cycling trail that follows parts of the Coquitlam River through Colony Farm Regional Park eventually encircling the community of Port Coquitlam which is a suburb of the Greater Vancouver area. It's about a 30 to 45 minute drive to any of the starting points of this trail. The route follows DeBoville Slough, the Pitt and Fraser Rivers through wetlands and agricultural land. The Traboulay Poco Trail has a number of parking spots from which to choose and features a number of excellent wildlife viewing opportunities.

    When we do part of this trail we usually park near Deboville Slough at Victoria Drive & Cedar Drive in Port Coquitlam. There is enough parking here and once you get to the trail you will see a trail to the right of a creek and a trail to the left of the creek. Either one is fine to follow and gives you great views of the Pitt River, the surrounding mountains even as far as Mount Baker which is located in the USA. There are toilets at the start of the trail, but none after that.

    View from the Traboulay PoCo Trail View of both trails with the creek in the middle Pitt River and Mount Baker (USA) in the distance The Pitt River and surrounding mountains View from the Traboulay PoCo Trail
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    Grant Narrows Regional Park in Pitt Meadows

    by Ann75 Written Jan 29, 2013

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    Grant Narrows Regional Park is a wonderful park located in Pitt Meadows which is a suburb belonging to the Greater Vancouver area. It takes about 45 minutes to an hours drive from downtown Vancouver to get to this park. Pitt Lake is one of the main attractions here and is a really pretty lake surrounded by mountains. Once you get to the parking lot you can follow a gravel trail/dike to the right which takes you for a nice stroll along the lake. On your left you will see Pitt Lake and the beautiful mountains and to your left you can see some big marsh cover with with lily pads in season. The area is great to spot Great Blue Herons, different kind of ducks and other birds.

    About half way on the dike there is a lookout tower as well to your right. If you walk to the end of the dike you can make a right hand turn and follow a trail which goes all the way around the marsh and back to where the parking lot is. By the marsh there are a few other trails you can continue to follow, but be aware that some of these can be closed during nesting season for birds. In the summer time you can rent canoes at Pitt Lake, there is usually a concession stand and bathrooms. The lake is popular with boaters and canoeists, but is prone to heavy winds and rains as well as big waves (due to its great depth).

    Pitt Lake itself is the second-largest lake in the Lower Mainland (Greater Vancouver area) of British Columbia, being about 53.5 square km (20.5 square mi) in area. It is about 25km (15.6mi) long and about 4.5km (2.8mi) wide at its widest, and is also one of the world's largest tidal lakes, its confluence with the Fraser being only a few miles upstream from that river's estuary into the Strait of Georgia. Its southern tip, where the Pitt River resumes, is 40km (25mi)east of downtown Vancouver.

    The community of Pitt Meadows occupies the marshy lowland at the southern end of the lake, some of which has become drained and is known as the Pitt Polder. You can find lots of dikes in the area which are either grassy or covered with gravel. There is an access area to a very nice dike just a little ways before you get to Pitt Lake. Here you can walk for miles or even ride your bike. There are several benches along these dikes where you can rest and take in all this beautiful scenery.

    We really love to go for a walk here now and then as you really feel like you are far far away from the city and city life. It's so quiet and serene here. Any time of the day is beautiful, but early morning and late afternoon evening provides beautiful light on the lake and mountains...especially on sunny days. It can get pretty windy here, so always take an extra sweater or so.

    View from one of the dikes in this park View of the grassy dikes in this park View of beautiful Pitt Lake Beautiful sunset seen at Pitt Lake The marsh left and  the lake right looking back
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    English Bay- Inukshuk

    by GentleSpirit Written Jul 16, 2012

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    The inuksuk was chosen as the symbol of the 2010 Olympic Winter Games held in Vancouver.

    The traditional inukshuk is used as a point of reference, or something that points the way to a settlement, a guidepost. The translation is that "something that acts for or performs the function of a person." They are, however, not built in the shape of a person.

    The figure that resembles a person is known as a inunnguaq. This symbol is becoming more common in Canada and is often being used as a national symbol.

    english bay inukshuk
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    Whytecliff Park

    by bocmaxima Written Apr 18, 2012

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    Whytecliff Park sits on a point just west of Horseshoe Bay in North Vancouver and faces directly west over the Georgia Strait. It's easily accessible from TCH/BC 99 via Marine Drive. There is a small cove beach, meadows, picnic tables, restrooms, shaded areas and, of course, amazing views across the strait. Admission and parking are free.

    Related to:
    • Whale Watching
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    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    The New Amsterdam Cafe

    by carlosx Updated Jan 11, 2012

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    A smoke friendly café. You will find a wide variety of people in this place. Snacks and drinks available. They do not sell pot but let you smoke it. They sell a large variety of pipes and other goods. You have to be 19 or older to enter.

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  • A little gem

    by MsVancouverGirl Written Sep 22, 2011

    A local treasure for those that live close by to the park. It has an outdoor swimming pool (summer only), dog walking areas, grass areas to picnic or play on, paths for walking and ocean front views.

    It has nice mix of industrial and nature with views of the North Shore mountains, Iron Workers’ Memorial Bridge, Cascadia Grain Elevators, Iron Workers’ Memorial Bridge and boats heading to and from the Port of Vancouver.

    If you are in the area or visiting the PNE, it's worth spending some downtime here however Vancouver has many more parks to enjoy if you aren't in the area. You have to walk into a tunnel from the parking lot to enter which has a bunch of grafetti, it's fun looking at the artistic work of artists. Parking is available on site.

    When I use to live in the area, I loved in-lining to the park, walking around and then resting in the sun before heading back home. It's quieter then most parks but can get busy on a warm summer day.

    Winter time at the park

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    Bainbridge Island

    by GlobeTrottin Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    There are some wonderful, quaint islands that will be a quick 1/2 day trip from Seattle.

    Check http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/ferries/schedules/current/ for their current schedules.

    They leave about every 40 minutes from 5:30 am to past 1am.
    The ferry ride itself is a joy- it's about 35 minutes.

    There are some great little shops when you get to Bainbridge.
    Although the island is primarily 'getaways' for locals, if you take a bike with you, it would definitely make for a nice bikeride that's an alternative to the crowded Stanley Park.

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