Stanley Park, Vancouver

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  • Stanley Park, Vancouver, B.C.
    Stanley Park, Vancouver, B.C.
    by Tricky_Dicky69
  • Stanley Park
    by Herwig1961
  • Stanley Park
    by shavy
  • shavy's Profile Photo

    Stanley Park Lighthouse

    by shavy Written Sep 12, 2014

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    Not far from the statue of the Girl in a wetsuit if you continue cycling or walking, you'll see this light house. There is a view plateau or bench where you can see the distance of the harbor. While standing here, again you'll have the beautiful architecture of Vancouver. Stanley park is really lies in a good location. If you just walked or whatever it suits you and follow the seawall you have incredibly view of the city

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    Vista of the harbour and the skyline

    by shavy Written Sep 11, 2014

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    The seawall is essentially a paved pathway that encircles the whole park, which is easy to jog,walk,rollerblade or cycling. There are different ways of getting here, you can take the bus or the coach tour. But most of the visitors cycling around the park, it gives you freedom to do on your own. So many to see around and you certainly need time if you want to do this.

    Renting a bike is the easiest way, you can discover the park at your own pace of mind
    We stop many times to take photos, here, you have a beautiful views of the skyline and the harbor of the city. Is highly recommended to rent a bike if you like to visit Stanley Park

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    Girl In Wet Suit Statue

    by shavy Updated Sep 11, 2014

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    While we continue biking around Stanley park, we came to this statue. This remind me the one I saw in Copenhagen Denmark, she was also setting on a rock. The statue set about 30 feet out the water, probably against vandalism. The statue was stood in a nice environment where backdrop of the harbor. You'll find this spot if you walked or cycling around the park. The excellent view behind the statue where you see all the ferry passing through

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  • yvr's Profile Photo

    A Beautiful Park to Spend some time in

    by yvr Written Jul 27, 2014

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    Stanley Park fronts the water, Coal Harbor on one side and English Bay on the other.
    There is a walk way as well as bike lanes that go completely around the park. There are also many trails to follow that will take you out of the mainstream of traffic and people. There is a small putting green as well as lawn bowling. Be sure and visit the Totem Poles. There are a couple of places to eat in the park, Prospect Point and The Tea House. On Sunday's you can find an artist colony, showing off their paintings. The Aquarium is also located in the park and is not to be missed. Be sure and follow the sea wall that goes under the Lions Gate Bridge, it quite a sight when you approach and walk under it. Stanley Park is a nice way to spend a few hours enjoying the beauty of nature so close to the city.

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    Stanley Park

    by Arial_27 Written Mar 16, 2014

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    Stanley Park was opened in 1888, named after Lord Stanley, the Governor General of Canada at the time. It is a must-see in Vancouver, heavily visited by tourists as well as locals!

    The Park itself is huge, having some 404 hectares (1001 acres). The views from Stanley Park are gorgeous at any time of year. I visited in January and still loved the sights. It was actually very nice coming at this time of year as it was likely much less crowded than it probably gets in the summer months.

    There is so much to see and admire in the park. There is a 22 km seawall, a wonderful place to just relax and stroll while you talk to family or friends, or walk your dog. Lots and lots of trails, gardens. The largest attraction in Stanley Park is probably the set of 8 totem poles at Brockton Point. They say that this may be the largest tourist attraction in British Columbia.

    Walking along the seawall One of the many gorgeous views HUGE totem pole
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    Stanley Park

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Aug 18, 2013

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    Sitting on the Western edge of Downtown, Stanley park is one of largest urban parks in existance. It juts out into the bay which gives it a feel of being in the middle of nowhere despite being next door to downtown Vancouver. The park is ringed by the paved seawall trail that extends about 15 miles from Canada Place to Kitsalano Park.

    Stanley Park Stanley Park Stanley Park Stanley Park Stanley Park
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    Stanley Park

    by GentleSpirit Updated Feb 20, 2013

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    Stanley Park was opened in 1888, named after Lord Stanley, the Governor General of Canada at the time. It is a must-see in Vancouver, heavily visited by locals and tourists alike.

    Lord Stanley threw his arms to the heavens, as though embracing within them the whole of one thousand acres of primeval forest, and dedicated it 'to the use and enjoyment of peoples of all colours, creeds, and customs, for all time. I name thee, Stanley Park. (quote on the Statue of Lord Stanley)

    The Park itself is huge, having some 404 hectares (1001 acres). The views from Stanley Park are magnificent. There is a 22 km seawall around the park, a wonderful place to just relax. Lots and lots of trails, gardens. I was quite taken by the old growth forests inside the park, for example.

    One of the biggest attractions in Stanley Park is the set of 8 totem poles at Brockton Point. They say that this is the single largest tourist attraction in British Columbia.

    Totem poles in Stanley Park Old growth forest in Stanley Park downtown Vancouver the poet Robert Burns
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    First Nation totems

    by GentleSpirit Updated Feb 20, 2013

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    These are located in Stanley Park at Brockton Point, on the eastern edge of the park.

    there was a very nice collection of eight totems, characteristic of the First Nation tribes of the Pacific Northwest, these are one of the most popular tourist attractions in both Vancouver as well as British Columbia.

    Totem poles
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  • mccalpin's Profile Photo

    A walk in the Park...and a nice meal

    by mccalpin Updated Jan 8, 2013

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    First, Stanley Park is beautiful, a heavily forested park larger than Central Park in New York. And, unlike Central Park, there is a walkway at sea level (so, quite flat) all the way around the Park.

    The reference in the Wikipedia article on the Park to the seawall path being 14 miles long is completely misleading...they're counting all the trail that runs through the city and along the coast away from the park as well. Since the park itself is only 1.5 square miles, the seawall path around the Park itself is more like 5.5 miles...

    However, the big deal is the elevation of the Park. I couldn't find a reference to the elevation of the Park at its height, but when I was there long ago, I decided to start at the southwest corner of the Park in town, and walk clockwise.

    I knew that there was a restaurant at the highest point of the Park, on the north south of the peninsula, near the bridge (see the map at Stanley Park website)

    OK, so a nice 2.5-3 mile walk on perfectly flat path along the water to get to the far side, then I would go up to eat at the Prospect Point Cafe (Cafe website). Sounds good, huh? (actually, the salmon on fettucine was VERY good)...but I didn't realize that getting up to the cafe involved walking straight up several hundred feet (so it seemed) up a series of switchback stairs. I was a reasonably healthy 35-year-old at the time, and I was quite winded when I got to the top.

    So, clue #1 - if you're walking to the cafe, walk through the park, not along the seawall trail.
    Clue #2 - if the hilly terrain in the park to too tough to walk (does anyone know the elevation?), then look into taking a taxi up there (if possible, I assume it is).
    Clue #3 - eat at one of the OTHER places to eat in the park ;-) - see
    Dining in Stanley Park.

    But, there's no doubt, the park is a lovely place...

    P.S. I walked back to town through the Park, but it was all downhill then ;-)

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    A must!!

    by oceania26 Written Jun 1, 2012

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    If you can, dedicate a day to Stanley Park, it's definitely worth it especially if you walk the whole seawall. It's not difficult at all and while take you a few hours but the views are great all around. There's washrooms, water fountains, benches and places to eat along the way. Alternatively you can rent a bike from one of the shops on Denman - I saw a sign for $5/hour.

    The aquarium is also worth a visit if you have the time.

    You can also get a map of the park to help you plan your route.

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    Prospect Point in Stanley Park

    by Ann75 Written Jan 24, 2012

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    If you are driving through the park you will most likely drive by Prospect Point, which is a little bit higher up in the park. From up here you have a great view over the Lions Gate Bridge, North Vancouver, West Vancouver and the ocean. There are also displays about the big wind storm that pounded Vancouver in December 2006. The winds were westerly and devastated this area of Stanley Park and blew down tons of trees in Stanley Park and damage some of the cliff which ultimately damaged the seawall below. They have rebuild a lot in this area and the seawall below is open again after lengthy repairs and repaving.

    There is the Prospect Point cafe up here, which is great place to enjoy a little snack or a full meal. There is also a gift shop, washrooms and more. Once you have purchased a parking ticket you can use it on all the parking lots/spots throughout Stanley Park.

    *Parking fees:
    Spring/Summer (April 1 - September 30 from 6.00am until 9.00pm): $3 hourly or $10 for the whole day.
    Fall/Winter: (October 1 - March 31 from 7.00am until 6.00pm): $2 hourly or $5.00 for the whole day.

    View from Prospect Point towards North Vancouver View from Prospect Point towards West Vancouver Mount Baker seen from Prospect Point Display about the fallen trees from the 2006 storm
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    Visit the Totem Poles in Stanley Park

    by Ann75 Written Jan 24, 2012

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    You will also find a little bit of Vancouver's native history. While in Stanley Park don't miss the beautiful totem poles. These are a very popular attraction in the park and give a glimpse of the native history from that area among the beautiful scenery found in and around Stanley Park. There are displays about the history, a gift shop and of course the beautiful totem poles. If you visit in the summer, you might choose to visit the earlier in the morning or later in the day as it can get quite busy here.

    Vancouver is a city steeped in native aboriginal traditions, so it was only logical that an Indian Village display be constructed to honor those traditions. The display initially included four traditional totem poles. By 1936 many additional totems were purchased from neighbouring islands. Some of the oldest totem poles, carved in the late 1880s, unfortunately began to succumb to the elements. The majority of the totem poles you see today are replicas of the originals, which were sent to numerous museums for preservation sake.

    One totem however, is a fairly recent addition and brings the total number of totems to nine. This new totem was carved in 2009 by a member of the Squamish Nation as a tribute to his mother, as she was one of the last original residents of Stanley Park.

    The totem poles in Stanley Park during the fall Close up of one of the totem poles Another angle of the totem poles Another close up of one of the totem poles And a view of the totems during winter time
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    Cycling in Stanley Park

    by Ann75 Updated Jan 24, 2012

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    A great way to explore Stanley Park is by bike. There is a designated bike path that you can follow all the way around Stanley Park and if you feel ambitious you can bike all the way around English Bay along False Creek to Granville Island. And if you still want to bike more you can continue along the Vanier Park, Kitsilano Beach and all the way to UBC. This bike route is approximately 25km (16 mi)one way.

    There are several bike rentals near the park to choose from. You can rent bikes by the hour, half day or a full day...the choice is up to you! Here are a few to chose from:
    *Stanley Park Cycle
    *Bayshore Bike Rentals
    *Vancouver Bike Rental
    *English Bay Bike Rentals

    Biker on the seawall Bike/walk path on the seawall (bikes on the left) Bikers on the Stanley Park seawall
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  • Ann75's Profile Photo

    A green oasis just minutes from downtown Vancouver

    by Ann75 Written Oct 28, 2011

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    If you visit Vancouver then you should definitely take some time out to visit Stanley Park. The seawall is the most populair attraction for walking, biking or inline skating. There is a beautiful view around every corner. You'll get some great view of downtown Vancouver, the Lions Gate Bridge, North & West Vancouver with the mountains as a backdrop, the beaches, English Bay and more.

    Stanley Park is a favourite for tourists as well as locals. This park is a 405 hectare (1,001 acre) urban park sitting on a peninsula attached to downtown Vancouver. There is a paved trail that circles that park which is called the "seawall". This seawall is about 9km (5.5mi) long and is created for pedestrians, cyclists and inline skaters. Much of the park is still forested with tons of trees that stand as tall as 76m (249ft) and are almost a hundred years old. There are approximately 200 km (120 mi) of trails and roads in the park.

    Stanley Park is home to some great landmarks such as Siwash Rock and the totem poles There are also several great things to do with the whole family such as a visit to the Aquarium which is located right in the park. There are several landmarks, attractions, gardens, beaches, restaurants and more.

    To walk all the way around the park it takes at least a couple of hours, if you plan on stopping at all the different sights then you can easily count on 3 to 4 hours. A great way to explore the park is to rent a bike (more on that in another tip).

    View from the seawall towards downtown The totem poles in Stanley Park View of the Lions Gate Bridge from the seawall Siwash Rock along the seawall Third Beach along the seawall
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    Visit the Prospect Point

    by joiwatani Written Sep 28, 2011

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    This is where you see the beautiful Lion's Gate and an spectacular view of the North Vancouver. Prospect Point is actually at the tip of Stanley Park and on an edge of a hill that is fenced for safety precautions for visitors and tourists. It has a great view deck where you can look down where you can see ships passing by going to the ports of Canada.

    At a distance you can see the Gross Mountain and across the Lion's Gate Bridge, you can see some beautiful housing.

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