Stanley Park, Vancouver

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  • Stanley Park, Vancouver, B.C.
    Stanley Park, Vancouver, B.C.
    by Tricky_Dicky69
  • Stanley Park
    by Herwig1961
  • downtown Vancouver
    downtown Vancouver
    by GentleSpirit
  • joiwatani's Profile Photo

    Walk around the Stanley Park

    by joiwatani Updated Jan 2, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Walk way at Stanley Park with the view of Vancouve
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    It's good to walk. I walked around the park and cut across the park to go to the Japanese Monument which is pretty close to the Vancouver Aquiarium! It must have been two miles!

    There is a pavement used for skaters and there is also a walk way for just pedestrians. A separate pavement for cars (one-way street) is to the right of the walkway.

    Walking is very refreshing especially around Stanley Park because of the view and because of the separated walk-ways which is very safe for tourists. Besides, there is the ocean to the right of the walk-way and the park to the left. You pass by the Totem Poles which made Stanley Park famous for, the Canadian Lady on the round rock, the Canadian-Japanese boat replica, etc. The walk is so pleasant because you can actually smell of the saltiness of the ocean breeze.

    The horse-driven carriage passes you by carrying a dozen of tourists going to visit the Totem Poles. Or, some tourists in their cars are passing by enroute going to the Capilano Bridge!"

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    Amazing Park

    by jamiesno Written Jun 24, 2004

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    Stanley Park view from Grouse Mountain

    "To the use and enjoyment of people of all colours, creeds and customs for all time." - Lord Stanley, Governor General of Canada, in 1889, at the dedication of Stanley Park

    Stanley Park, Vancouver's first park, is an evergreen oasis of 400 hectares (1,000 acres) close to the heart of Vancouver's downtown core. Its natural west coast atmosphere offering a back drop of majestic cedar, hemlock and fir trees embraces visitors and transports them to an environment rich in tranquility.

    In all of my tips I have been very complementary to the amount of green space in Vancouver but this is a jewell.

    Really you should plan to spend a day in Stanley Park or if you are there for a while go for shorter periods of time and explore a different part every day. It is almost 9 kilometers to walk all around the parimeter of the park.

    It is simply one of the things you have to go experience in Vancouver. Please rate my tips and leave your comments.

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    English Bay Beach

    by jamiesno Written Jun 24, 2004

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    English Bay Beach

    There are several beaches in Vancouver. English Bay Beach is on the west side of Stanley Park but just before you get to the park itself and is one that is very active.

    There is beach volley ball happening and a lot of people walking and sun bathing and looked more like a younger adult crowd.

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    • Eco-Tourism

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    Stanley Park Outdoor Pool

    by jamiesno Written Jun 24, 2004

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    Stanley Park Pool

    In the "Second Beach" area of Stanley Park you will find a very large outdoor pool.

    On a hot day it is clearly a good part of the park to jump in and cool off. These area of the park there was a lot of kids and families obviously enjoying the pool.

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    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    Massive Trees

    by jamiesno Written Jun 24, 2004

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    Me in Stanley Park

    Where I live in Canada trees are smaller and some are not any taller than I am but I can attest on the west coast of Canada the trees are massive.

    As you can see in this picture just one minute off the Stanley Park Seawall Promenade and you are in the middle of some very dense forest and massive rain forest trees.

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    The Lion's Gate Bridge

    by jamiesno Written Jun 24, 2004

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    View of Lion's Gate Bridge from Prospect Point

    The Lion's Gate Bridge was originally built by the Guinness family to allow access to their property developments on the north shore, the bridge was opened in 1939 with the sparkling necklace of lights added in 1986 for the City of Vancouver's Centennial Celebrations.

    When you drive across the bridge you will be greet by two monument lions thus the name.

    In this picture you can see one of the best views of the bridge is from Prospect Point within Stanley Park.

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    The SS Empress of Japan in Stanley Park

    by jamiesno Written Jun 24, 2004

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    SS Empress of Japan

    This is yet another monument you will find in Stanley Park, Vancouver.

    It is a replica of figurehead of the S.S. Empress of Japan which plied these waters thrity one years from 1891 - 1922 carrying Vancouver's commerce to the orient. The original carving was restored by the Vancouver Province in 1928.

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    STANLEY PARK

    by LoriPori Updated Oct 25, 2004

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    Totems in Stanley Park

    On Saturday, May 31, Hans and I spent the afternoon with Ed, Stephanie and their adorable son Roman, at STANLEY PARK. The world's most viewed totem poles draw about eight million visitors a year to Stanley Park near Brockton Point. Many are flamboyantly coloured.
    Stanley Park is a 1000 acre park, located in Vancouver's downtown core. There is a free shuttle that circles the park with stops at the most popular spots. Driving around the park is only in one direction, so if you miss a spot, you will have to circle around again. Ed parked near the Totem Poles, so we didn't have far to walk.

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    PROSPECT POINT @ STANLEY PARK

    by balhannah Written May 16, 2010

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    View of the Bridge from the lookout

    Another spot which is a MUST STOP....is PROSPECT POINT LOOKOUT

    The views from here were wonderful! We looked across to the North Shore Mountains, Burrard Inlet and the Lions Gate Bridge. The views of the bridge are excellent, and better still if you happen to see a large Cruise liner pass under the bridge.
    A point of interest here, is a plaque in remembrance of the “Beaver” Vancouver’s first steamship. It capsized on the rocks across from the viewpoint.

    There's also a full restaurant here, shops selling souvenirs, Ice-creams and other refreshments.
    Racoon's sometimes can be seen in this area, we didn't see any, just Squirrel's.
    Another sight you may see, is First Nation carvers carving totem poles with chainsaws. We didn't see this either, but did see a person playing a very unusual musical instrument.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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  • JanPeter74's Profile Photo

    Stanley Park

    by JanPeter74 Updated Aug 30, 2004

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    Totem Poles in Stanley Park

    Stanley park is the largest "city"park of North America. It's the major attraction of Vancouver. The park is filled with all kinds of interesting things to see and do. A major attraction are the Indian Totem Poles. Furthermore, you will find a swimming pool, beaches, a rose garden, forest, ponds and lots of great viewpoints. The park is for a large part surrounded by water and especially the area around the Totem Poles and Brockton Point has spectacular views of downtown to one side and North Vancouver to the other. Stanley Park is also home to the famous Vancouver Aquarium.

    Around the park lies the so-called seawall with a (mostly oneway) road, footpath and bike/skatepath. You can imagine the great relaxed atmosphere on a sunny day with tourists, joggers, cyclists and inline skaters.

    The park is serviced by means of several busservices to the centre of the park (the area of the Vancouver Aquarium) as well as the free Stanley Park Shuttle, which circles the park and has 14 stops along the way. When you go there by car, bear in mind that all parkings are pay-and-display, so bring coins.

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  • joiwatani's Profile Photo

    Visit the Stanley Park

    by joiwatani Updated Jan 2, 2009

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    %cbMy nieces DJ and Viel, August 2007%c*
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    There are three very famous and very cheap place to visit in Canada: Stanley Park, Queen Elizabeth Park and the Capilano Bridge. All you need is a car and drive to these parks. There are no fees to pay. Unlike other places. It is a nice drive to Stanley Park. The place is beautiful overlooking the water and the city of Vancouver. You will also find a lot of people just walking around, exercising, biking, skating, chatting, sitting down or just plain relaxing. There are Indian totel poles that are the landmark of Stanley Park.

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    Third Beach

    by jamiesno Written Jun 24, 2004

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    Third Beach

    Third Beach is yet another beach in Stanley Park that is very active. Lots of families and sun bathers. Is is getting further away from the downtown when you are in this area.

    There is also food and washrooms just up from the beach in this area.

    If you are walking around the park via English Bay and Second Beach in that direction which is not the normal way mind you, most people enter from Georgia Street and walk around in that direction. In any event if you are walking the other way at Third Beach you have to decide if you are going to continue walking the seawall promendate or venture into the forest uphill to the Hollow Tree and Prospect Point. You won't be able to get back down to the promenade until you get to Prospect Point. The walk is mostly uphill as this is the highest point in the park.

    You are trading off the amazing view at Prospect Point for small seawall views and a close up of the Shiwash rock, if your up for a steeper walk I would recommend heading up to Prospect Point!

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    The Hollow Tree!

    by jamiesno Written Jun 24, 2004

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    Me inside the Hollow Tree

    This now hollowed out stump with nurse trees growing from the crevices of its woody skeleton was once a thriving cedar tree. At one time its girth measured 18.3 meters (60 feet). In the early 1900s this site was a very popular locaton for photographs either with horses and buggies backed into the hollow or those newfangled contraptions automobiles! Apparently lightening done this damage to the tree. It is located in Stanley Park, it is distinctly pointed out on all maps of the park. It is enroute to either Third Beach or Prospect Point depending on the direction you are taking. You can drive to this area of the park if you want to do that via Stanley Park Drive.

    Please leave your comments and rate my tips, I love reading them. All the best and happy travels!

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    Siwash Rock in Stanley Park

    by jamiesno Written Jun 24, 2004

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    Siwash Rock from the Rain Forest

    Siwash Rock is an offshore monolith that the Squamish people who once lived in Stanley Park believe to be a symbol of 'clean fatherhood.'

    You have to look beyond the trees to see Siwash Rock in my picture. I took it from the hills through the rain forest enroute to Prospect Point.

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    Prospect Point in Stanley Park

    by jamiesno Written Jun 24, 2004

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    Me at Prospect Point

    Height is not Stanley Park's long suit. Prospect Point is a mere 210 feet (64 m) above sea level, so expect an easy go of it along the majority of paths and trails.

    This point was first known as "Chaythoos" or "High Banks" by the First Nations people. Here one is at the half way point around the Park Drive and greeted with unequaled panorama views of the north shore mountains, English Bay to the west and the Lion's Gate Bridge.

    There is also a gift shop and restaurant here with a great deck and view. On a hot day like the one during my visit I recommend an ice cold locally brewed beer. It will go down good beleive me!

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