Bus (Translink), Vancouver

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  • getting around Vancouver
    getting around Vancouver
    by dianneswain
  • modern
    modern
    by dianneswain
  • On the bus, coming back from Stanley Park
    On the bus, coming back from Stanley...
    by Jefie
  • joiwatani's Profile Photo

    Ride the bus!

    by joiwatani Written Sep 30, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The bus to and from Capilano Suspension Bridge

    You can take the bus going to Capilano Suspension Bridge. It is best to take the bus especially during the peak season which is the summer time. There is not a lot of parking lots close to the park if you decided to drive your car. The time when we went there is September and thus, there is a lot of parking spaces for us across the street. The parking fee is $2.00 at the back of the Bridge House Restaurant.

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  • Biljana's Profile Photo

    ~COAST MOUNTAIN BUSES~

    by Biljana Updated Sep 13, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Intro
    Bus service in Greater Vancouver is provided seven days a week, 18-20 hours per day, on most routes. Major bus routes operate every 10 minutes or better in peak periods, some as often as every 4 to 6 minutes. Most buses are lift equipped for wheelchairs and baby strollers and have external bike racks.

    B-Line Routes
    B-Line Routes offer fast, frequent and limited-stop service on major/busy routes. The buses on these routes run every 3 to 15 minutes. The B-Line buses are accordion-style buses and they provide easy access to wheelchairs and baby strollers. All B-Line buses also have bike racks.

    There are three B-Line routes:

    97 B-Line (Coquitlam/Lougheed Town Centre)
    98 B-Line (Richmond-Airport-Vancouver)
    99 B-Line (UBC-Broadway/Commercial)

    NightBus
    NightBus is a limited service. It runs every 30 minutes, Monday to Saturday until 3am. The current night services connections are:

    Downtown/West End
    Downtown/UBC
    Downtown/
    Scott Road Station
    Downtown/SFU

    Shuttles
    Community Shuttles are minibuses that service less hectic routes. They are lift equipped.

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  • Carmanah's Profile Photo

    Bus

    by Carmanah Updated Feb 19, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A bus zooming down Robson Street in downtown

    The bus is the cheapest and one of the most efficient ways of getting around Vancouver. You do not need a car in Vancouver. The bus can take you to all of the city's main attractions. Most visitors to Vancouver find its public transit service to be excellent and highly efficient. As a user myself, I can highly recommend it for getting around town.

    Vancouver's bus system uses transfers. When you board a bus, you drop the exact change ($2.50 for adults, 1 zone) into a little machine by the bus driver. The bus driver pushes a button, and out pops a little credit-card sized paper swipe card with a magnetic strip. Instead of showing the bus driver the transfer when you board the bus, now you actually insert the transfer into the machine, and the machine determines if your transfer is still valid or not.

    Transfers normally expire 90 minutes after you purchase them. This means that for 2 hours, you could hop on and off any bus, Skytrain, or SeaBus as many times as you'd like. Once the 2 hours run out, your transfer will no longer be valid, and if you want to board another bus, you'll have to pay another $2.50 fare.

    Transfers are handy if you're doing a lot of bus transferring within a short period, however, if you're planning to spend all day taking buses, it might be cheaper to purchase an all-day pass at a 7-11. It currently costs $9.00 for a day pass.

    With transfers, it doesn't matter what direction you travel in, but it does matter what *zone* you travel in. The Vancouver public transit system is divided into zones. They're kind of like concentric circles. The further out of the city centre you travel, the more you'll have to pay. Basically, Vancouver acts as one zone. Vancouver plus a neighbouring city, such as Burnaby, Richmond, North Vancouver, etc, acts as 2 zones. Vancouver, plus a neighbouring city, plus an even further neighbouring city acts as 3 zones. Basically, if you only pay bus fare for 1 zone, then your transfer is only good in that zone.

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Excellent Bus Service - North Vancouver

    by Mikebb Updated Jan 21, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    North Vancouver Bus Terminal, Opposite Ferry Termi

    We found public transport to be very good, although we were able to walk to many attractions we did use the ferry, bus and train on 3 or 4 days during our stay.

    The North Vancouver bus terminal is conveniently located opposite the ferry terminal and on the 2 days we used the bus we waited less than 15 minutes for connection. The drivers are very helpful and if you ask they will tell you what bus to catch and when you arrive at your destination.

    We used the North Vancouver buses on 2 separate days, to visit Grouse Mountain and then to visit Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge. Both visits using public transport were much cheaper than private bus tours.

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  • duanestorey's Profile Photo

    Public Transit

    by duanestorey Written Apr 12, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A bus, downtown Vancouver

    Getting around Vancouver is pretty easy. The public bus system spans most of the major road systems, although getting to remote locations is a bit tricky. Busses are generally named after the roads they go down, i.e., the #49 bus goes down 49th avenue, #4 goes down 4th avenue, etc. If you head downtown, you can catch busses to West Vancouver, or even the ferry terminal.

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  • jenniferhen's Profile Photo

    The Bus

    by jenniferhen Written Mar 13, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    OK, I may be the biggest bus travelling idiot there is but here is my story.... I got on the correct bus to go downtown...its all going good, no problems at all. It is cheap. easy and most of all very safe. I was told that once I get downtown that I should get off and remember where I got off. I thought, well that is odd, it is a transfer station, it should not be too hard to find again.... Well no one told me that there was no transfer station!! I am sitting on the bus thinking to myself, man is downtown ever big, when will we ever get to that station.... As we are leaving downtown, I sense trouble....why are we leaving the downtown core??? As the skyscrapers become smaller in the ever growning distance I finally clue in... So my tip of the day is that when you see the big buildings, get OFF the bus. hey cut me some slack, I come from a village of about a 1000 people....these things are not known to a girl like me:)

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Forget about renting a car!

    by Jefie Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On the bus, coming back from Stanley Park

    It is incredibly easy to get around Vancouver using public transportation - most bus routes run along a street or avenue in a straight line, so all you need to do is figure out which intersection you want to get close to. Bus drivers are also good at pointing you in the right direction and letting you know when you should get off. The one thing I found slightly annoying was that buses don't always run on time, especially if there happens to be snow. But if you're not in a rush, this shouldn't be a problem.

    If you plan on spending a few days in Vancouver, I'd recommend buying a 10-ticket pack (you can get them at Safeways, corner stores, drugstores, etc.; the 7-11 at the Vancouver airport sells them) to save a bit of money. There are three travel zones: downtown Vancouver is in Zone 1, the airport, Grouse Mountain and Capilano Suspension Bridge are in Zone 2, and the ferry terminal to Victoria is in Zone 3 - the further you go, the more you'll have to pay, except on weekends and in the evening, when travel zones don't apply. You can always get a Zone 1 pack ($21) and pay the difference as you get on the bus. To use your ticket, just stick it in the little machine next to the bus driver - you can also use them on the skytrain and seabus (you'll find validation machines at each station). Once your ticket is validated, you can travel wherever you want during 90 minutes.

    It is quite easy to plan your trip using the trip planner available on the TransLink Website so don't bother renting a car, just get on the bus!

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Metro Bus On Robson Street

    by Mikebb Written Jan 25, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Metro Bus, Robson Street
    1 more image

    We walked the city as often as we could but sometimes you do not have time or the energy to walk back to your hotel. We caught the city metro bus along Robson Street several times, cheap and fast and what a relief on our feet.

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Bus

    by Dabs Written Aug 19, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Although we mainly walked during my visit in Vancouver, we used the bus a couple of times when heading into downtown Vancouver. The fare to use the bus in zone 1 is $2.25 each way and the ticket is good for 90 minutes so you can also use it on the SeaBus to get to Grouse Mountain, Lynn Canyon, etc. or the SkyLink which we didn't use.

    If you are planning on doing a lot of travel, you can purchase a 10 ticket booklet for $18 so individual rides cost only $1.80 or you can get a day pass for $8 which is also good on the SeaBus.

    If you are paying on the bus, you need exact change and I believe that most buses only take coins even if you are paying for more than one person.

    We only went outside zone 1 once during my visit, the bus ride to the ferry terminal for Victoria was in zone 3 and it cost $4.50 on the way over, $2.25 on the way back because it was off peak.

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  • rmdw's Profile Photo

    Translink - Vancouver's Public Transit System

    by rmdw Written Sep 27, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    B-Line Accordion Bus

    Vancouver has a fairly extensive public transit system consisting of several integrated parts that include:
    - An elevated automated train (SkyTrain)
    - Standard diesel and electric buses
    - Dbl length accordion-style buses (B-Line)
    - A series of small ferries (SeaBus)

    It's not as well established as most Eastern North American transit systems but is steadily being improved every decade.

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  • bocmaxima's Profile Photo

    The Bus and Day Passes

    by bocmaxima Written Sep 22, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Even though I had a car, I decided to take the bus into town (I was staying in North Vancouver) one day to avoid dealing with parking in the city.
    The bus system is actually quite good and the routes all seem to run frequently and pretty much on time.
    The frustration I had was in purchasing a day pass, which itself is quite expensive at $8. I ended up at four different places while trying to buy one, and finally had to come back in the morning to get it since stores close fairly early in suburban Vancouver. It's nice to have one though as it works on the buses, the Sky Train (subway) and the Sea Bus.
    You can buy them at 7-11's (all over the place) and Safeways, but just note that a lot of the locations only have a few, if any, and a lot of the staff doesn't even know that they exist. Why they don't sell them at the visitors' centers is beyond me.

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  • dianneswain's Profile Photo

    when in doubt and don't know which way to go!

    by dianneswain Written Aug 3, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    getting around Vancouver
    1 more image

    Vancouver is easy to get around. Many modes of transportation from bus to ferries. Good city for walkers. Never felt threatened while walking the streets even at midnight by myself . I found the citizens, including the police to be very helpful when I needed directions or info.

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  • jasperdo's Profile Photo

    Translink Bus

    by jasperdo Updated Nov 23, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vancouver Bus
    4 more images

    Translink operates an extensive system of bus routes throught the Greater Vancouver region. Within the city of Vancouver, many of these are Trolley Busses, which are rubber wheeled vehicles with an overhead electric wire. These wires criss-cross all over downtown Vancouver. Most of the suburban busses are gas powered, many are the Articulated, bendy type.

    The busses in Vancouver are very popular. On the local routes in the downtown area, it is standing room only during much of the day. I found most of the bus drivers to be very friendly. I've actually seen some of them greet every passenger with a sincere "Hello". And all the drivers are very helpful and courteous with befuddled tourists.

    In Downtown Vancouver, the two best routes for visitors are Route 5 - Robson, and Route 6 - Davie. These are actually the same bus, they just change numbers at Denman and Davie. They basically circle the West End, travelling down Granville Mall, Robson, Denman and Davie. All of these streets have shops and restaurants along them. Robson is the most upscale, Davie the cheapest. Get off at Davie and Denman and you'll be in the heart of English Bay, a very scenic part of the West End. Stanley Park is only a few blocks from here.

    The Translink busses are also convenient to many of the sights in Vancouver. Here are a couple of my favorite excursions:
    1) Take bus 250 along Georgia Street. It crosses the Lions Gate Bridge, travels through exclusive West Vancouver neighborhoods and winds up at Horseshoe Bay. There is a very scenic marina here, and it is a major BC Ferry terminal.
    2) Catch bus 491 Southbound along Burrard Street. It will take you through Vancouver and the city of Richmand to the village of Steveston. Steveston is a neat fishing village, with historic buildings, numerous shops and restaurants, and the Gulf of Georgia Cannery National Historic Park.
    There are many other places you can go to by bus...such as Queen Elizabeth Park, Grouse Mountain and Lynn Canyon Park. Check the Translink website for more info.

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  • d_knows's Profile Photo

    Bus service around the North...

    by d_knows Written Sep 8, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bus service around the North Shore and lower Mainland is excellent. $2.50 and u should keep yor ticket on you if u travelling across zones cos same ticket no matter how many trsansfers u use and it last for about 2 hours from time of 1st purchase.
    Oh, buses hav right of way here, as soon as they indicate, they can move into a lane and cars gotta allow them

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  • UKDaisy's Profile Photo

    Public bus to downtown

    by UKDaisy Written Mar 16, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To get from YVR airport to downtown, catch the #424 Translink bus to the Airport Station stop, go to Bay 1 and then catch the #98 B-Line to downtown. Fares are $3.25 peak and $2.25 off-peak. Transfers are free - just remember to pick up the proof-of-payment/transfer ticket when you pay your cash fare. Also, the buses only accept exact coin fares. Duration of journey approx. 45mins.

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