Yoho National Park Things to Do

  • Emerald Lake
    Emerald Lake
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Emerald Lake
    Emerald Lake
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Emerald Lake
    Emerald Lake
    by Jim_Eliason

Most Recent Things to Do in Yoho National Park

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    Takakkaw Falls

    by Twan Updated Mar 11, 2012
    Takakkaw Falls
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    We went to a camp near Field. Today is cloudy and sunny. We have been around noon at Kicking Horse Campground. In the afternoon we go up a steep road (we have a hairpin bend backwards just stabbing) direction Takakkaw waterfalls.
    Great ride to a very high fall with a difficult name.

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  • chewy3326's Profile Photo

    Natural Bridge

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 17, 2011
    Natural Bridge
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    A decently worthwhile stop on the Emerald Lake Road is the Natural Bridge, an odd rock formation that spans a rapid of the Kicking Horse River. While the Natural Bridge is certainly an interesting geologic oddity, it doesn't resemble the soaring arches and natural bridges associated with the American southwest. I liked the stop more for the surroundings than for the bridge itself- from a footbridge next to the natural bridge, there are good views of Mt. Stephen and the Kicking Horse River. As it's right off the Emerald Lake Road, there's no reason not to stop at this natural feature on your way to or from Emerald Lake.

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    Lake McArthur

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 17, 2011
    Lake McArthur
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    The largest lake in the Lake O'Hara region is Lake McArthur, which lies in southern corner of the basin. The lake is a pretty turquoise and has a sizable glacier at its southeast end; while I'm sure that there is very much about the lake to appreciate, my experience at the lake was dampened by a rainstorm.

    To get to the lake, follow the McArthur Pass Trail for a steady ascent from the Le Relais Shelter to Lake Schaffer and then continue up to the pass; from there, a trail begins to descend into McArthur Valley before climbing back uphill to the lake itself. The round trip is roughly ~8-9 km; it's a well-known and pretty hike, and although being drenched detracted from my experience here slightly, I still found the area to be remarkably scenic.

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    Odaray Grandview

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 16, 2011
    Lake O'Hara
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    One of the many scenic trails in the Lake O'Hara region is the Odaray Highline and Grandview Trail, which climb to viewpoints on the slopes of Odaray Mountain. This is a very worthwhile hike, as the views here offer a good overview of the entire Lake O'Hara area. Access to the Odaray Highline Trail is restricted to four parties a day, so if you plan on hiking it, it's advisable to go earlier in the day. The restrictions are due to the high grizzly traffic in the area, especially through McArthur Pass.

    To get to the area, take the McArthur Pass Trail past the Elizabet Parker Hut and its nearby meadows and Schaeffer Lake. The Odaray Highline Trail follows the slopes of Odaray Mountain from McArthur Pass, passing through meadows with constant good views. At the end of the Highline Trail, there are good views of Cathedral Mountain and there's also a good chance to see mountain goats. From here, the Odaray Grandview Route, a steep route with cairns rather a real trail, clings to the side of Odaray Mountain, climbing to a viewpoint of Lake O'Hara, Lake McArthur, and the peaks that surround the area.

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    Opabin Plateau

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 16, 2011
    Opabin Plateau, Lake O'Hara
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    Lake O'Hara may be the gem of the Rockies, but Opabin Plateau is the gem of Lake O'Hara. There are few places I have ever been to that have been so easy to hike to yet offer such incredible scenery. This plateau is a hanging valley above the Lake O'Hara basin and has two fairly significant lakes of its own, Hungabee and Opabin Lakes. The East Opabin Trail, which can serve as either an entry or exit point to the plateau, follows a creek up into the valley, where the lakes are surrounded by sparse forest and green meadows and glaciers. Opabin Lake is especially pretty; the south end of the lake has a pretty glacier and the lake itself is surrounded by Yukness, Ringose, and Hungabee Mountains.

    A network of trails runs through the plateau, allowing access to the two lakes. Give this place as much time as you can- although the plateau can be reached in a 3-4 hour round trip hike from Lake O'Hara, you will definitely want to spend much longer to appreciate the absolute beauty of the area. Hiking up to the plateau requires a moderately strenuous exertion.

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    Opabin Prospect

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 16, 2011
    Opabin Prospect
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    The most well-known day hike in the Lake O'Hara area is probably the Alpine Circuit, which traverses a large portion of the high country above the lake and offers what are reportedly amazing views. Although I didn't get to hike that circuit, I did get to see what I considered to be the most thrilling view of Lake O'Hara accessible by a non-Alpine Circuit trail. This viewpoint, at the northern rim of the Opabin Plateau, offers a sweeping view over the entire valley that Lake O'Hara is nestled in- a forested valley nestled between Cathedral Peak, Odaray Mountain, and Mt. Huber. Beside the Lake O'Hara, the slightly less spectacular (less colorful) Mary Lake is also visible.

    Some highlights of the view: Odaray Glacier is clearly visible, and the Wiwaxy Gap portion of the Alpine Route can be seen ascending vertically up the side of Mt. Huber. The trail to Lake Oesa is also visible.

    To get to the prospect, follow the south lakeshore trail, then take the West Opabin Trail, which passes by Lake Mary, then begins a steep climb to the plateau that has many views of Lake Mary and Cathedral Mountain. Once atop the plateau, a trail heads off to the left that pops in and out of the forest and eventually leads to the very edge of the Opabin Plateau and the prospect.

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  • chewy3326's Profile Photo

    Lake Oesa

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 16, 2011
    Lake Oesa
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    This 6-km round trip hike is one of the many enjoyable in the Lake O'Hara region. Following the lakeshore trail around the lake's north shore, you'll come to the branch-off for this trail before reaching Seven Veils Falls. The trail ascends steeply and quickly gets atop a rocky ledge above the lake, from which there are incredible views of the beautiful lake and Odaray Peak. As the trail climbs further, the wavy rock formations on Mt. Huber become particularly apparent. A little farther on, the trail begins to follow the stream that drains Lake Oesa; the trail passes numerous waterfalls and two small lakes as it continues to climb, until it finally reaches the Lake Oesa basin. Set at the foot of Mt. Lefroy and Mt. Victoria, the lake is a stunning blue in a rocky, barren basin; across the lake, there's a glacier visible. The mountains here tower thousands of feet above the lakeshore- it's a stupendous sight.

    There's no real trail, but you can make your way along the lake's south shore to a viewpoint of both the glacier and of Abbott Pass. It's possible to see the Abbott Pass Hut here, which is also visible from the Plain of Six Glaciers in Banff National Park.

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    Lake O'Hara Lakeshore Trail

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 15, 2011
    Lake O'Hara
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    This relatively easy loop trail follows the shoreline of Lake O'Hara and allows you to access the other trails in the area (Lake Oesa, Opabin Plateau). Some of the prettiest views are on the south end of the lake, where you can look north across the lake to Odaray Mountain and where you can see Seven Veils Falls. There's some elevation gain and loss, but it's the flattest trail in the area and certainly doable by anyone in decent shape.

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    Lake O'Hara

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 13, 2011

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    Lake O'Hara
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    Tucked away in a valley beneath Mt. Victoria, Huber, and Lefroy with some of the most turquoise water of any lake in the Rockies, Lake O'Hara is arguably the most enchanting spot in the Canadian Rockies. The secluded lakes is set beneath some of the most beautiful peaks in the Rockies and has Seven Veil Falls dropping into the far end of the lake and lush, forested shorelines. Day hikes also emanate to the lake's incredibly spectacular surroundings.

    So why isn't Lake O'Hara overrun like Lake Louise or Emerald Lake? Well, access is quite limited- the road to the lake is not open to vehicular traffic! You can hike 11 km in, or, about 3 or so months in advance, you can book a seat on one of the four times that the Lake O'Hara bus runs from a parking area near Highway 1 down to the lake. While most people make visiting the lake a day trip, camping at the lake's campground is highly recommended as it gives you time to explore the area.

    It may be out of the way and the logistics of getting to the lake may deter some, but don't give up going because of those issues- Lake O'Hara is seriously beautiful and you won't have to share it with tour bus hordes. Don't miss it.

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    Wapta Lake

    by chewy3326 Written Dec 13, 2011

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    Wapta Lake
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    Wapta Lake is a roadside lake just west of Kicking Horse Pass, off of Highway 1. Driving on the highway gives you good views of the lake, and from the area around the lake, Mt. Stephen, Cathedral Peak, and the side of Mt. Victoria are visible. While it's not the most spectacular of lakes in the Rockies, it's accessibility makes it a requisite stop.

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    Emerald Lake

    by chewy3326 Written Nov 18, 2011
    Emerald Lake
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    Emerald Lake, one of the most famous sights in the Canadian Rockies, has an undeniably beautiful color, but is honestly a bit on the overhyped side. The drive to the lake gives you views of the towering President Range and its glaciers, but when you get to the actual lake, the highest peaks and the glaciers are all blocked from view by lower, closer ridgelines. Then there are the crowds: tourists spill out of both Emerald Lake Lodge and from huge tour buses.

    However, these cons don't necessarily mean you should avoid the lake; during my latest trip to Emerald Lake, we escaped the crowds by hiking a little along the shore of the lake to good views of Mt. Burgess and the Ottertail Range to the south. A couple hundred yards along the north lakeshore from the lodge, there's an informative plaque about the Burgess Shale, one of the world's greatest collection of Cambrian era fossils, which lies across the lake on the exposed slopes of Mt. Field and Wapta Mountain. The Burgess Shale is only open to guided hikes- security is high to protect the incredibly important scientific area. It's one part of Yoho that I really hope to get to one day!

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    Takakkaw Falls

    by chewy3326 Updated Sep 7, 2011
    Takakkaw Falls

    This is perhaps the most spectacular point accessible by car in Yoho National Park: a 254-meter waterfall on the Yoho River plunging down a rock cliff. From the parking lot, a short trail leads over a bridge to the base of the falls, where the spray is enormous and drenching, and the view is spectacular. The falls plunge from the Daly Glacier, which is not far above the falls on the Continental Divide. From the area around the falls, it's also possible to look north and see the massive Yoho Glacier.

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Takakkaw Falls

    by spidermiss Written Apr 5, 2011

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    Takakkaw Falls, Yoho National Park, B.C.
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    This is the 2nd highest waterfall in Western Canada where its highest point is 384 m (1260 ft) from the base. The word, 'Takakkaw' means magnificent in Cree, a local Indian language, and the waterfalls were featured in the movie, 'Last of the Dogmen' in 1995.

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    Emerald Lake

    by spidermiss Written Apr 5, 2011

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    Emerald Lake, Yoho National Park, British Columbia
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    Yoho National Park's largest lake. The lake is surround by mountains of the President Range and also Mount Burgess and Wapta Mountain. It is known for its deep emerald colour resulting from glacial feed and hence the name! There are some hiking trails that circulates the like which many can partake and in the summer you can rent a canoe. In winter you can able to go cross country skiing on the lake. Tom Wilson was the first European to visit (and name) the lake when he was exploring the area and this is what he had to say about it:

    'For a few moments I sat [on] my horse and enjoyed the rare, peaceful beauty of the scene.' (Source: Wikipedia)

    This quotations has had a mark on many travellers since and visiting Emerald Lake was one my highlights on my Rockies trip.

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    Burgess Shale

    by kymbanm Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Waterton Glacier view ....

    The diverse and sometimes bizarre animals preserved in the shales represent a complete ecosystem that existed only a very short time, relatively speaking, after the first explosion of multicellular life on earth... about 515 million years ago ....

    The fossil filled areas of the park are only accessible by liscensed guides in order to protect these prehistoric finds ....

    All hikes are by reservation only; a limit of 15 people per hike ensures a quality experience and security of the fossil site. Reserve early.
    Guides are licensed and knowledgeable. They provide valuable interpretation of the Burgess Shale fossils and the park's other natural features.

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Yoho National Park Things to Do

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