Sussex Travel Guide

  • Sussex, in the broad Kennebecasis River valley
    Sussex, in the broad Kennebecasis River...
    by Bwana_Brown
  • Looking into the valley from Prescott Hill
    Looking into the valley from Prescott...
    by Bwana_Brown
  • Me on a ZR900- One wicked sled!
    Me on a ZR900- One wicked sled!
    by marcoparco

Sussex Things to Do

  • Beautiful countryside

    New Brunswick is 90% covered by forest, the highest coverage of any state or province in North America, and the landscape is rolling due to the many rivers, brooks and creeks that cut through it. As a result, good farming areas are difficult to come by, unless you happen to have a fertile river valley to use as a basis. The Sussex area fits the...

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  • The Railway was once a big deal

    As mentioned in the Intro, Sussex came into being because of the construction of the European and North American Railway, the final section of which was completed through the area in 1860. The idea was to tie into the New England railway network so their goods could be shipped to the major ice-free port of Halifax in the days before ice-breakers...

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  • Some classic old Victorian houses

    Back in the days before globilization, when Sussex was famous for its Golden Ginger Ale (soda to Americans, pop to Canadians) and dairy products, I think there was some serious money floating around the town. Although this photo shows quite an ornate house downtown beside the present-day Town Hall, most of these Victorian-era houses were located on...

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  • Still a bustling little place

    During my time in Sussex and still today, Broad Street seems to be quite a busy spot. This is a very short street with shops along only one side, since the railway runs down the other side of the street. It starts as a branch off Main Street and only runs a few hundred feet before it ends at a small 'island' that can be circled to head back again...

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  • A few surviving Elm trees

    It is a shame the havoc that introduced diseases can wreak as they travel here and there in the world, infecting things that have no immunity to their effects. Such is the case with Dutch Elm Disease, a plight that has severely affected Elm trees world-wide. Both of my 'home' towns of Sussex and Fredericton have been severely ravaged by the...

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  • Historic buildngs - relatively speaking!

    As its population grew with the coming of the railway, Sussex was incorporated in 1895 and shortly thereafter became a town in 1904. Obviously, this had been seen coming because this majestic 'Dominion Building' was inaugurated in 1883 to house various government offices required to look after the needs of the population. During my time in Sussex,...

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  • The town's Military Connections

    This part of New Brunswick was quite sparsely populated until the the Revolution of the American colonies took place (1776-1783). Many settlers in those areas pulled up stakes and moved north to the free land being offered in the colonies of Canada, in order to remain British Loyalists, as they are now known. That was the first major influx of...

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  • Kennebecasis River

    OK, as rivers go, the Kennebecasis (pronounced 'ke-ne-buh-KAY-sis') is not all that impressive, even if it did scare me a few times when I was floating on it in a home-made raft! At only 60-miles (97-km) in length, this photo just south of Sussex in Apohaqui, shows that it is merely gathering its strength as it drains the nearby highlands area...

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  • The Dairytown

    The official nickname of Sussex is the 'Dairytown' because of the numbers of surrounding farms and the quality of dairy products that have been produced here over the years. In my time, the award-winning old Sussex Cheese & Butter company plant was one of the main employers in the area, but it has long since been torn down. However, all was not...

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Sussex Hotels

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Sussex Restaurants

  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo
    An eastern Canadian favourite

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Oct 29, 2006

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    It may be hard to believe, but back in the late 1960s and early 1970s when I had the chance to travel westward through Montreal, I was amazed to discover how delicious pizzas and submarine sandwiches were! Strange and exotic foods such as these had not yet made it into the conservative lands east of Quebec and Ontario! This trend began to be corrected in 1968 when the Pizza Delight franchise opened its first store in Shediac, outside Moncton, NB. Over the years it has grown to include more than 100 restaurants in seven Canadian provinces and has expanded beyond the initial pizza offerings to a more varied Italian menu.

    Favorite Dish: Lately, when I am in Sussex I have been taking my mother out for the odd lunchtime meal at the local Pizza Delight. They have introduced a new 'starter' gimmick where you can choose (at no extra charge) from various types of thick bread slices, apply a jalapeno, garlic or whatever spread and then grill it yourself while you wait for your order to arrive. Menu items include pizzas, soups, sandwiches, panzarotti, donairs, chicken & ribs and pasta dishes. They also serve a good house wine and bottled beers. The excellent food and service make this a very popular chain throughout eastern Canada!

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Sussex Local Customs

  • Historic Murals

    In recent years, residents of Sussex initiated a mural project that involves contributions from artists all over the world painting historic scenes on the side of the downtown buildings, depicting various aspects of life in this small town. Partially in answer to the denuding of the town caused by the loss of its majestic old trees due to Dutch Elm...

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  • Sulphurous water Fountain

    Near the top of Church Avenue sits an old water fountain that has been there as long as I can remember. The story was that a drink of its waters would bring you good health and that was a good thing, because you certainly were not drinking the sulphur-smelling water for its taste! Another legend was that the source of this water was somehow used in...

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  • Sussex Hotels

    5 Hotels in Sussex

    41 Reviews and Opinions

Sussex Warnings and Dangers

  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo
    The now fenced-off passenger unloading side 1 more image

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Apr 28, 2007

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    During my first few years in Sussex (1954-62) I lived with my parents and three brother/sisters in a very modest house about four blocks to the left of the train station in this view and only a couple of blocks away from the tracks. The whole house would shake and we could easily hear the warning horn signals at the several street crossings in town whenever the long freight trains rumbled through day and night. It so happened that both the large buildings of the Sussex Golden Ginger Ale plant and several rows of parallel tracks where cargoes could be shunted off to the side were located very close to where we lived.

    This naturally led to my brother and I, along with our friends, spending a lot of time playing in and around the train tracks in those days before most families could afford a TV (even though we had been warned that the wheels of trains would 'suck us in' if we got too close to them). Sometimes we would walk out of town along the tracks until we came to bridges over small brooks, or we would put pennies on the rails and wait to see how flat they would be after a train passed by. Other times we would climb in and on top of the numerous boxcars or flatbed cars loaded with pulp-wood logs that were sitting in the marshalling yard. When we got bored with that, we would find ways to climb up onto the warehouse roof at the Ginger Ale plant for a better view of our surroundings. Of course the housing on the 'wrong' side of the tracks was even poorer than ours and they had their own 'gangs' that hung out, so we had to always be ready to high-tail it home if our two groups happened to bump into each other in this 'borderland' area. It is probably a good thing my parents did not know half of the stuff we were up to in those early days of amusing ourselves! The 2nd photo shows me on my best behavior with my mother watching behind we children, as my older brother was invested to a higher elevation as a Queen's Scout!

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    • Family Travel

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Sussex Off The Beaten Path

  • A cluster of old barns

    Not far from Sussex, atop Keirstead Mountain (not much more than a large hill in reality!) I pass by this cluster of old barns every time I drive down from Fredericton. They have been there as long as I can remember, even when I was just a child in the backseat of my parents car. On a 2004 trip, I got thinking about that and figured I had better...

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  • Picturesque Covered Bridges

    Sussex is known as the 'covered bridge capital of Atlantic Canada' because there are 16 of these bridges located within Kings County and 8 of these bridges are within a ten minute driving distance of the town. The Kennebecasis valley has long been a preferred route for travellers between Saint John and Nova Scotia because of the natural shelter it...

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