Hopewell Rocks, Province of New Brunswick

5 Reviews

131 Discovery Road Hopewell Cape, NB E4H 4Z5 1-877-734-3429

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  • Hopewell Rocks
    Hopewell Rocks
    by Suzze
  • Hopewell Rocks
    Hopewell Rocks
    by Suzze
  • The grounds to Hopewell Rocks
    The grounds to Hopewell Rocks
    by Suzze
  • Suzze's Profile Photo

    Tides the height of a 4 storey building

    by Suzze Written May 22, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hopewell Rocks
    2 more images

    We spent a while at Hopewell Rocks this day as it was quite near to where my sister lives, and she wanted to take us to see some sights of and around the area of Moncton. We had a lovely drive out along the coast this day, and we saw the signs for Hopewell Rocks. I had seen it on VT so as it was not too far away I suggested we go there. It was a shame because when we got there nothing was open yet, we could see the rocks that was no problem, and we even went down onto the sea bed. I could imagine this place would be bursting later on in the month. Apparently nothing starts or opens until the third week of May. It was still nice to go there though and I took some great shots of the place. There is also a park there, but we couldn't go into it as it was closed, and would not be open for another couple of weeks. Really fustrating! There is also a Interpretive Centre where you can see exhibits, displays and video's of the Bay of Fundy exploration, if your really into this kind of thing. Also a cafe and seating areas to eat.
    The park entrance fee is for 24 hours too, but do not know how much they are.
    We just went out to the look out decks and walked down the steps onto the seabed, just to say we'd done it. It was done at our own risk as there was no supervision. The tide was out a way so we were ok, and we were only there a very short while.
    You can walk on the ocean floor from three hours before low tide to three hours after.
    It's well worth a visit and would imagine it would be a nice way to spend a day or afternoon there, once it's all open to the public.

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  • High Tide and Low Tide at Hopewell Rocks

    by cpm440vee Updated Sep 1, 2006
    Hopewell rocks during low tide

    If you've ever learned about the tides in school but never really seen it in action, go to Hopewell Rocks. In fact, do what I did - visit first during high tide, go somewhere else for the day like Saint John and then come back later in the day to see the low tide. It's incredible that all that water just "vanished". You're even allowed to walk on the "beach" during low tide. Check Hopewell's site for the Tide Tables so you plan your trip accordingly. And the great thing is that your ticket is good for 24 hours. That's the best $8 that I spent on this trip. During high tide you can also go on a guided kayaking trip ($55 offered through http://www.baymountadventures.com). Oh, and don't forget to bring mosquito repellant. There are lots of mosquitos in the forest as you walk to the rocks. But don't let that discourage you from this natural wonder.

    Related to:
    • Kayaking
    • National/State Park

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  • kazander's Profile Photo

    Hopewell Rocks

    by kazander Updated Aug 5, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hopewell Rocks at high and low tide

    My goodness no one told us of the Disneyland marketing fiasco that the Hopewell Rocks have become! Yikes! I mean the Rocks are beautiful and amazing but the set up for visitors left a little to be desired. I felt like a sheep following every other tourist down the trail to the stairs and to the rocks.
    The Flowerpot rocks as they are called , are interesting formations that have been eroded by the mighty tide of the Bay of Fundy. They turn into little islands with tufts of greenery on their heads at high tide. At low tide you can walk amongst them on the ocean floor.
    The trail down to the rocks is a little long and steep, but if you are out of shape you can get carted to and from by a little glorified golf cart. It will cost you $1.25 (one way) to do so. There are a few lookoff points, we found that only the main one was really crowded, if you go down past the Low Tide Cafe towards the kayak rentals there are a few lookoffs that were practically empty, save a very nice park ranger.

    Hours of Operation - 2004 Season
    May 21 - June 11 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
    June 12 - June 25 8:00 am - 7:00 pm
    June 26 - August 20 8:00 am - 8:00 pm
    August 21 - September 6 8:00 am - 7:00 pm
    September 7 - October 11 9:00 am - 5:00 pm


    Year 2004 Rates

    Adults 19+ $ 7.00
    Seniors 65+ $ 6.00
    Children age 5 - 18 $ 5.00
    Children 4 and under Free
    Families (2 parents + 2 children 18 and under ) $ 18.00
    On-site Transportation: $1.25 one way
    $2.00 round trip

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • kazander's Profile Photo

    Kayaking amongst the Hopewell Rocks

    by kazander Written Jul 28, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    kayakers amongnst the rocks

    Oh, how I wished we had done this! Alas, we didn't have time this trip, but hopefully we will return one day and we can get a chance to go.
    The guided kayak tours last about 2 hours. No experience is required, they will give you an on site lesson. The kayaks are 2 seaters, so you have a buddy helping with the paddling.!
    Don't miss it, regrets are awful things to have.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches
    • Kayaking

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Hopewell Rocks

    by richiecdisc Updated Nov 23, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hopewll Rocks at dawn

    This is perhaps the biggest attraction on the Bay of Fundy and oddly not a National Park, inconvenient if you have purchased a National Park Pass. These surreal red rock formations are made of a conglomerate of rocks and pebbles washed down from the Caledonia Mountains and are a direct result of the massive 50 meter tides of the Bay of Fundy. Once part of the surrounding cliffs, they separated to form these odd gravity defying entities. The red mud beaches are fun to poke around in, but only at low tide, otherwise these curiosities are best explored by kayak.

    Related to:
    • Kayaking
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking

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