Unique Places in Province of Newfoundland and Labrador

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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Province of Newfoundland and Labrador

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    Visit Gibbet Hill

    by crummey Updated Mar 17, 2010

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    Gibbet Hill overlooks St. John's Harbour.

    A Gibbet is for the public display of executed criminals and Gibbet Hill is named after such a scaffold.

    Gibbiting was meant as a deterrent to others

    The corpses were painted in tar to preserve them, and many remained on display for years.

    Gibbets were usually upright posts with crossbeam. The tarred-corpses were suspended from the crossbeams by chains. Sometimes they were chopped into quarters and hanged in different places.

    Folklore states Gibbet Hill received its name in the early 1600's when pirate-corpses were hanged upon the mount.

    Gibbet Hill was used by Major Richards in 1701 for the public display of a court-martialed soldier.

    It was again used in 1754, to display the bodies of two criminals convicted of miurdering Judge Kean.

    Gibbiting didn't end all that long ago. Folklore states the last time anybody was sentenced to be gibbited in Newfoundland was 1837.

    Gibbet Hill
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    Alexis River / Port Hope Simpson Labrador

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Port Hope Simpson is a small community strategically located centrally on the south east coast of Labrador. The forestry and tourism industries are very popular in the area.

    This is a beautiful view of the Alexis River. A great area for boating and fishing. It's location makes it a great base point as well to explore the southeast coast of Labrador.

    Great view of the Alexis River
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    North West River

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    North West River is central Labrador's oldest community, just 30 kilometres away from Happy Valley - Goose Bay. North West River is also straight across the river from the Innu community of Sheshatshiu.

    North West River is also home to the famous beach festival every summer.

    North West River Landscape
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    Mary's Harbour, Labrador

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Mary's Harbour is my birth place and home to many aunts, uncles, grand parents and friends so naturally I would recommend a visit to Mary's Harbour.

    It is mainly a snow crab fishing village where most of the employment is generating in the fishery sector. With the opening of the new coastal Labrador highway tourism is providing new employment.

    Mary's Harbour is also a gateway to the restored and historically rich Battle Harbour.

    It is also home of the Crab Festival an event that takes place every August so for some amazing seafood dishes I highly recommend this event for the bakeoff competition alone!

    Old Boat Slip and Mary's Harbour

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    Nain, Labrador

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Nain, Labrador has always been one of my favorite communities to explore to date in Labrador.

    It is Labrador and Newfoundland's most northerly settled community. The culture, fishing and scenery in Nain make it well worth the visit.

    I have a link to my own Nain page with more tips and amazing pictures of this area of the province.

    Nain Harbour at Low Tide
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    • Eco-Tourism

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    Happy Valley - Goose Bay, Labrador

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Happy Valley - Goose Bay is located in central Labrador and a great place for a stagging point for the rest of Labrador.

    Happy Valley - Goose Bay itself is very rich in Innu, Metis and Inuit culture. Combined in the summer months with nationalities from England, Italy and Germany the town is truly a melting pot of cultures unriveled by other towns in the province.

    I have a link to my own Happy Valley page with many more tips on activities for this region.

    Me on the Sir Robert Bond in Lake Melville
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    Battle Harbour, One Time Capital of Labrador!

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Description:
    Battle Harbour is about 9 miles away from Mary's Harbour, Labrador on the southeast coast, maybe a little closer from St. Lewis, Labrador. The historic fishing village has been rebuilt and it really is like stepping back in time.

    I have fond memories as a kid spending a lot of time in the Battle Harbour area in speed boats jigging for the now elusive cod fish.

    If you have access to a speed boat there are also a lot of remains of other old vising villages in the area. For example ask about Trap Cove, Maddie's Cove and Indian Cove.

    These three are all within walking distance if you have a guide and great bakeapple country!

    Be sure to visit the Battle Harbour Web Site

    History:

    The mercantile saltfish premises of Battle Harbour was established by a British firm, John Slade & Company in the mid 1700's. Because of its location Battle Harbour, became the major base for the region's cod and seal fisheries and for commercial trade and for two centuries was known unofficially as the capital of Labrador. The first provincial hospital, outside of the capital of St. John?s, was established there in 1893 by Dr. Wilfred Grenfell, and it was the site from which Commander Robert Peary announced his successful expedition to the North Pole in 1909. Noted ecclesiastical architect William Grey designed the Church of St. James the Apostle for Battle Harbour in the late 1840s. Built in 1852 and restored in 1991, St. James is the sole surviving example of Grey's work. It is also the oldest surviving Anglican church in Labrador.

    The relocation of community residents under a government-sponsored resettlement program from 1965 to 1970 to nearby Mary?s Harbour, the replacement of saltfish operations with fresh and frozen fish industries and then the decline in the inshore fishery at the start of the 1990s saw an end to all operations at Battle Harbour.

    Source: www.labradorcoastaldrive.com

    This is a national jewell so make an effort to get to Battle Harbour!!

    At Battle Harbour, Acreman House in the background
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    Cartwright, Labrador

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Description:
    Cartwright is a great place in Labrador from which to access the famous Eagle River, the Wonderstrands, sea kayaking and also a port for the provincial ferry system.

    History:

    Cartwright, established in 1775, was named after Captain George Cartwright. He was an English merchant and adventurer who established a fish and fur trading business. The settlement of Cartwright provided him with an excellent sheltered harbour and FlagStaff Hill gave him a lookout point from which he could look for privateers. He erected two canons there, both of which are still in place today. The business first established by Cartwright was sold to the Hudson's Bay Company in 1837 and this business still operates in Cartwright today. The Mealy Mountains can be seen from the community. The Eagle River, 20 miles to the southwest, has the best salmon fly fishing in the world. Ten miles to the north is a 56 km stretch of sandy beach which the Vikings called the "Wonderstrands". To the east, lies the Atlantic Ocean and the Gannet Islands Seabird Ecological Reserve - home to 50,000 common murre, 35,000 puffins and 8,000 other birds. Eighteen miles to the east of the community lies Table Bay which is home to the largest colony for breeding eiders in Labrador. The Labrador Fisherman's Union Shrimp Company operates a crab plant which employs 100 - 150 people.The facility also processes whelk.

    Directions:
    Labrador regions southeast coast or zone 4.

    Cartwright, Labrador Harbour
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    Charlottetown, Labrador

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Description:
    Charlottetown is a great place to call home on the southeast coast of Labrador. It is an excellent village to get a feeling for small town Labrador with a rich fishing history and existing industry. Also a great place to try boating!

    Charlottetown first existed as "Old Cove", a winter place for summer fishing stations such as Square Islands, Seal Islands, Hawks Harbour, Dead Islands, Triangle, Tub Harbour, Venison Tickle, and Pinsent's Arm. These summer fishing stations were populated by families from Carbonear and Harbour Grace in Conception Bay, who fished for salmon in the summer and trapped in the winter.

    Charlottetown was selected as a permanent settlement in 1950 by Benjamin Powell Sr. and Clarence Perry. They were interested in medical, educational and religious services for their families. " Old Cove" was renamed Charlottetown by Mr. Powell in hopes that it would become the capital of the bay, as Charlottetown is the capital of Prince Edward Island. This same Benjamin Powell Sr. wrote many books about life in Labrador. He is a well- known Labrador author and has been honored with the Order of Canada.

    During the summer of 2001, the Labrador Fishermen's Union Shrimp Co. Ltd. opened in the first-ever shrimp processing facility for Labrador in Charlottetown.

    Directions:
    Labrador regions southeast coast or zone 4.

    Charlottetown, Labrador harbour view.
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    Forteau in the Labrador Straits

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Description:
    Forteau / English Point is actually where I grew up through my teenage years, so if you have questions on Forteau or the Labrador Straits region definitely email me and I'll be happy to help you explore this region.

    Very scenic views in this area, icebergs galore, close proximity to North America's second tallest lighthouse and a great salmon fishing river!

    Forteau includes the small communities of English Point and Buckles Point. Its name is derived from the French words meaning "Strong Waters". A Jersey merchant , De Quettville, started a fishing business there in 1774 and in 1818, it was reported that Forteau was the largest British establishment in the Straits. Guernseymen settled in Forteau on the western side of the bay at Buckle's Point, while a group from Devonshire, England settled at English Point on the eastern side of the bay. When Bishop Field of the Anglican Church was appointed to Newfoundland in 1845, he was surprised to learn that Labrador was within his jurisdiction. He visited Forteau in 1848 and in 1849 the first church was built there. In 1909 the International Grenfell Association built a nursing station here and the Grenfell Regional Health Services continues to give medical service in this region although from new facilities. The parking area at the end of the branch road along the west side of Forteau Bay is the beginning of the Overfalls Brook Hiking Trail. This trail provides an excellent lookout over Forteau Bay with Point Amour lighthouse visible in the distance. And the reward at trails end is a pure Labrador stream cascading over rocky cliffs on its way to the ocean.

    The Forteau River is a scheduled salmon river. The mouth of the river is a good place to go birdwatching.

    Directions:
    Labrador's most southerly region of the Labrador Straits in zone 5.

    Forteau Bay view from Crow Head
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    Fox Harbour now referred to as St. Lewis!

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Description:
    St. Lewis is the more common name, otherwise known as Fox Harbour. St. Lewis / Fox Harbour is another snow crab fishing community along the southeast coast of Labrador.

    It is very scenic as these pictures will show.

    The community is located just a few kilometers off the coastal Labrador highway and the community has put some nice RV parking areas in place with walkways and lookout if you travel right to the far end of this community.

    From this lookout area in St. Lewis there is a very high liklihood of seeing some amazing icebergs!

    Directions:
    In Labrador Regions southeast coast or zone 4.

    Me on at a traditional
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    Red Bay, Labrador the Whaling Capital!

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Description:
    The easternmost community accessible by paved highway. It was named "Baie Rouge" by the French in the 17th century. It's an ideal natural harbour, sheltered from the ocean by Saddle Island. Red Bay is the site of an extensively studied archaeological dig, begun in 1978, of a large 16th century seasonal Basque whaling station. The Basque galleon, believed to be the San Juan, discovered in the harbour is the best preserved 16th century ship north of the Caribbean. Parks Canada operates the Red Bay National Historic Site of Canada to tell an incredible story of hardship, exploitation and profit through walking tours, video presentation, interpretive displays and numerous original artifacts.

    Recently the community has also installed some great walking trails that will bring you to the top of some of the higher hills in the area. Take the time to walk up there and you will get some amazing views of the Red Bay area. Another great place to catch some views of icebergs.

    Very scenic and rich history in this town.

    Directions:
    In the southerly region of the Labrador Straits or zone 5.

    Red Bay welcoming sign.
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    • Archeology

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    L'anse au Clair, Labrador

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Depending on how you enter Labrador by road L'anse au Clair is one of two Labrador Gateways. The other is in Labrador City a more northerly destination.

    If crossing the Strait of Belle Island on the MV Apollo, L'anse au Clair is the first community you will find in Labrador. Just before entering there is a great lookout area and war memorial on top of the hill entering the community.

    A short drive and walk from the community of L'Anse au Clair, the "Jersey Rooms" are the remains of premises established by Jersey Fishermen late 1700s. Visible are ruins of stone building foundations and an extensive stone-paved walkway. L'Anse au Cotard is a lovely, secluded cove situated just a few minutes walk from the Quebec-Labrador border.

    There is also a great sandy beach in the community and a great hotel called the Northern Light Inn. There is also a couple of craft shops in the community that you can visit. I think you will enjoy your stay in this small community.

    Sandy Beach in L'anse au Clair
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    Lodge Bay, Labrador

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Lodge Bay, Labrador is a small former fishing village on the southeastern coast of the Labrador region. Most people in the community now work in the nearby community of Mary's Harbour in the crab fishery.

    I recommend if your driving the Labrador Coastal Drive to take some time and explore the little town. There is a convenience store and gas station right on the main highway which may come in handy.

    The community also has a great river for salmon fishing. If you have your fly rod with you, get some provincial tags and enjoy this river. Happy travels!!

    Lodge Bay, Labrador
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    Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, Labrador

    by jamiesno Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Rigolet was established in 1735 as a trading post. It has a population of 315 inhabitants and is located on Hamilton Inlet, which is at the entrance to Lake Melville.

    Rigolet is predominantly an Inuit community with its own distinct traditions and Inuktitut dialect. The community hosts the salmon festival each summer and makes for an excellent cultural experience.

    In winter you can enjoy one of the world's best winter trail networks, while in the summer you can experience some of the best fishing and boating Labrador has to offer.

    To get to Rigolet you will have to use either the provincial ferry system or Air Labrador. I have more information on both in my transportation tips. Enjoy the Salmon Festival. It is also a port of call if you take the Northern Ranger along Labrador North Coast.

    I truly enjoyed the Rigolet Salmon Festival. Please follow my link below to my seperate Rigolet page. These rural regions make Canada what it is today!

    Aerial View of Rigolet
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Province of Newfoundland and Labrador Off The Beaten Path

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