Gros Morne National Park, Province of Newfoundland and Labrador

17 Reviews

Norris Point, NL A0K 3V0, Canada 1 709-458-2417

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  • Gros Morne National Park
    by RACCOON1
  • Gros Morne National Park
    by RACCOON1
  • Entering the Morne
    Entering the Morne
    by RACCOON1
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    THE TABLELANDS AND TROUT RIVER

    by RACCOON1 Written Jul 23, 2014

    If you are in Gros Morne National Park you should go to The Tablelands , preferably on a sunny day. When the clouds are low the view is compromised.
    The Tablelands are on Highway 431 which runs west from Willowdale ( about a 45 minute drive).

    If you have driven to the Tablelands you might as well drive westward to Trout River which is technically outside the National Park.
    SEASIDE Restaurant knows how to cook fish.

    Trout River made the headlines in April 2014 when a carcass of a Blue Whale washed ashore in their harbour.
    Google : " Trout River Blue Whale"

    The Tablelands The Tablelands SEASIDE RESTAURANT   in   Trout  River

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    GROS MORNE PART THREE - The End of The Morne

    by RACCOON1 Written Jul 23, 2014

    If a boat ride is not exciting you can hike to the east end of the Morne from a starting point on highway 430 south of the boat entrance parking lot. It is a 8 hour hike ( return) and is classified as difficult.

    More difficult is a boat trip to the east end of the Morne where you are dropped off ( with a guide ) at the dock. There is a small dock . You then hike eastward to the top of the Morne and then south back to Highway 430. Duration 3-4 days. You need a permit and a guide. Classsified as very difficult.

    Big Waterfall at the East End of the Morne The East End of The Morne In The Distance

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    GROS MORNE PART 2 - Inside the MORNE

    by RACCOON1 Written Jul 23, 2014

    There are a number of waterfalls in the Morne. They were active the day we went only because it had rained the day before , otherwise they are just a trickle.

    Apparently caribou migrate through the Morne which is hard to believe .Somehow they descend one slope swim the lake and then ascend on the other side. The Morne is not that long so one wonders why the caribou do not walk around the east end.

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    GROS MORNE NATIONAL PARK

    by RACCOON1 Written Jul 23, 2014

    Gros Morne is one of the go to places in Newfoundland. It is located on the west coat of Newfoundland. The Entrance to the Morne is a parking lot about a 1.5 hour drive north of Deer Lake.There is a digital sign in the parking lot which gives the status of scheduled boat tours. You can make reservations by phone or at the Ocean View Motel in Rocky Harbour. You buy your tickets at the dock .From the parking lot it is a 35-45 minute hike to the boat dock, across this bog area. You may get rained on so rain gear is a must. The boat trip is 2 hours. Do not let weather make a change in your plans to take the boat ride. They need 15 people for a boat trip to go as scheduled. If there are not 15 people present than you can wait for the next boat . If you get bumped do not walk back to the parking lot.

    Parking Lot Entrance to Gros Morne Gros Morne from the 3 km trail to the boat dock. The Boat Dock and THe Boat ( one of two ) Entering the Morne Now it is getting wet.

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    Gros Morne National Park

    by brazwhazz Written Feb 16, 2007

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    It is said that Gros Morne National Park is to geology what the Galapagos Islands (Ecuador) are to biology. Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site back in 1987, Gros Morne is the place where the theories of continental drift were proven.

    For the less scientific minds, Gros Morne National Park is a place of great beauty, dominated by Gros Morne Mountain. We went there for the hiking trails -- which vary in length and difficulty, providing something for all types of hikers -- but boat tours and kayaking are also quite popular in the summertime. In fact, we would have gone kayaking had the weather not been so bad on our final day in the park.

    Gros Morne National Park is also special because it encompasses a number of small towns offering a range of accommodations. (We stayed in Rocky Harbour, the largest of these towns with a population figure of around 1,000.)

    Gros Morne Mountain Village of Rocky Harbour in the distance Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking

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    A Chunk of the Earth's Crust!

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Sep 24, 2006

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    A half-hour or so after leaving Deer Lake, you will enter Gros Morne National Park, one of Canada's best. Inside the southern edge of the park is an amazing geological wonder called the Tablelands. This, in fact, was the main reason why the park was made a UNESCO World Heritage site. The Tablelands is a 260-million year old chunk of lava from the earth's crust that broke off and was thrust to the surface during collisions between the constanting moving tectonic plates in this part of the world. There are a few other places in the world that also boast similar formations, in Oman, Cyprus, Tibet and southern Chile. The rocks are composed of peridotite but, when thrust to the surface, they change to the mineral serpentine. Due to weathering effects, serpentine turns to a tan colour, giving this huge formation its distinctive look. The chemical composition of the rocks is also not very condusive to plant life, consequently it appears to be a barren moon-like surface in comparison to the surrounding spruce forests. Here, I am sitting on the back of our car at a rest-site in the Park, but we really enjoyed our drive up onto and around this amazing chunk of rock! The other photo shows how the Tablelands sticks out from the crowd when viewed from the other side of Bonne Bay.

    The Tan-coloured Tablelands Tablelands as seen from Norris Point
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park

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    Ancient Paleo Eskimo Settlement

    by Bwana_Brown Updated May 10, 2006

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    Our first night north of Gros Morne was spent at the fishing town of Port aux Choix, about halfway up the Northern Peninsula. The earliest European presence here dates to the 1500's when the town received its name, Portuchoa, meaning "little port" from Basque fishermen who operated in the area. Although the weather deteriorated into showers and sometimes outright rain here, we were able to squeeze in a couple of activities.

    Our first visit was to the recently opened museum displaying the rich archeological finds discovered here regarding the earliest inhabitants of the region, thanks to the prehistoric coastline having risen above sea level when the glaciers melted. As their literature describes it: "This site commemorates the Maritime Archaic Indians who lived from the forest and marine resources of the Atlantic coast from Labrador to Maine between 7000 and 3000 years ago. Later, about 2500 years ago, the Groswater Paleo Eskimo, known as expert seal hunters, also inhabited the area. More recently, by A.D. 500, a Canadian Arctic people known as the Dorset Paleo Eskimo had arrived as far south as Newfoundland, of which they were the principal inhabitants for over 700 years. The Dorset occupation of Newfoundland marked the most southerly expansion of Paleo Eskimo peoples and the large habitation site discovered at nearby Phillips Garden provides detailed evidence of how they lived."

    The weather let up for a bit, so we struck out on the 4-km Phillips Garden trail for ourselves to have a look. The terrain along the trail is flat as it follows the coastline to the light tower at Point Riche. It is a fairly easy hike except for a couple of areas where you have to walk over limestone rocks. By exploring the low limestone cliffs, one can discover relics of the ancient past. Fossils are abundant throughout this limestone and the area's low vegetation with its unique array of wildflowers is in part due to the calcium-rich soil.

    Eroded limestone along Phillips Garden Trail
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Road Trip
    • Archeology

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    Viking Trail & L'Anse Aux Meadows

    by victorwkf Updated Mar 5, 2006

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    Due to shortage of time, I was unable to do the famous Viking Trail of Newfoundland. This trail starts from Gros Morne National Park and goes all the way north-west to the town of St Anthony's. It is called the Viking Trail because this is the place where Vikings from Europe first landed in North America way before Christopher Columbus discovered the new world, and therefore this is perhaps the first discovery of America by Europeans. Apparently the Vikings sailed across the ocean to Greenland and drifted down to Newfoundland. The historical site at L'Anse Aux Meadows showcase the Vikings and their artifects, which is one of the highlights of a visit to Newfoundland. To get here, please see my transport tips.

    L'Anse Aux Meadows, Newfoundland
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    Gros Morne Mountain

    by victorwkf Written Mar 3, 2006

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    When you are at Gros Morne National Park, the Gros Morne Mountain is a towering landmark which cannot be missed. For the more adventurous people, you can climb this mountain, but it will not be easy because of the loose rock and soil. The climb takes several hours and best done during summer when the weather is warmer.

    Gros Morne Mountain, Newfoundland
    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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    Gros Morne National Park

    by victorwkf Written Mar 3, 2006

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    Gros Morne National Park is an UNESCO world heritage site which is a must visit when you are in Newfoundland. The scenery and hiking trails are simply breathtaking (please see photos at the travelogue section of this VT page). The park is huge, with the centre piece being Bonne Bay which is surrounded by mountains and fjords. There are several cosy towns here such as Rocky Harbour (the biggest here), Woody Point, Norris Point, Trout River etc. Please visit my VT pages on Woody Point and Trout River for more insight into these lovely towns. Best time to visit is during summer to mid-autumn but there will be lots of tourists. The park is also opened during other seasons, but accomodations and transport are limited, but you get very few tourists and the whole park to yourself. I went during November 2005 and enjoyed my trip.

    Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Camping

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    Rocky Harbour - Northern Gros Morne NP

    by Redlats Updated Oct 11, 2005

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    The main town in the northern half of Gros Morne National Park is Rocky Harbour. Gros Morne (in fact all of the Maritime National Parks we visited) is different than parks like Banff or Jasper in that the towns are actually not in the park. For instance, Rocky Harbour is surrounded by Gros Morne NP, but the town itself is just a fishing town like any other in NL.

    We arrived in Rocky Harbour in the evening. In time to see a wonderful sunset (the picture does not do it justice). Rocky Harbour has about five B&B's, some restaurants, a few tourist shops and a hotel, so it is touristy, but not too bad.

    After the sunset, we landed up finding a restaurant with a fish dinner and buying some knick-knacks before retiring to our B&B for the evening.

    Sunset at Rocky Harbour
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    • National/State Park

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    Woody Point - Southern Gros Morne NP

    by Redlats Updated Oct 2, 2005

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    Gros Morne National Park is also an UNESCO World Heritage site primarily because of the Tablelands - an ancient mountain range which was created when when tectonic plates collided, and one plate got shoved up over another one.

    We enjoyed our day and a half in the southern half of the park. We included activities such as hiking on the barren Tablelands, cruising an inland pond, exploring the Discovery Centre (the park's visitor centre) and soaking up the feel of the small sea-side fishing village of Woody Point.

    See our Woody Point pages for more details on Gros Morne NP.

    Woody Point - Road to Tablelands on right
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    • Beaches

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    Gros Morne National Park

    by jamiesno Written Oct 3, 2004

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    If you are planning to visit Labrador through the Labrador Straits and have to drive up the northern peninsula of Newfoundland Island it is worth taking a stop at Gros Morne National Park.

    Gros Morne National Park of Canada was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987, is an area of great natural beauty with a rich variety of scenery, widlife, and recreational activities.

    Visitors can hike through wild, uninhabited mountains and camp by the sea. Boat tours bring visitors under the towering cliffs of a freshwater fjord carved out by glaciers.

    Waterfalls, marine inlets, sea stacks, sandy beaches, and colourful nearby fishing villages complete the phenomenal natural and cultural surroundings of Gros Morne National Park of Canada.

    Here in this picture I have an aerial view I took from an Air Labrador flight enroute to Labrador. You can see the rugged terrain is beautiful.

    Gros Morne National Park
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Gros Morne National Park

    by Del. Updated Oct 29, 2003

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    Gros Morne National Park is absolutly amazing. Incredible scenery, animals, friendly people. I hotched hiked around this area and I would definatly recommend people to do that. Its a way of getting to know the real people. People were constamtly offering me drinkj, places to stay. I can't talk highly enough of these people. Try and go on a boat trip through the fjord. Also if you have time climb to the top of it, the views are amazing.

    Gros Morne National Park
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    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Western Brook Pond Boat Tour

    by chinagirl Written Jun 25, 2003

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    This tour is inside the Western Brook Pond in Gros Morne National Park.
    We almost didn't take it, since it was very windy the first time we tried and it was cancelled. You have to do a small 45-minute hike to get to the boat, which lasts around 2 hours.
    The view is a perfect fjord-like scenery, and if you're lucky you can even spot a black bear (we saw one quite far in the mountain)

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    • National/State Park

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