Fun things to do in Province of Newfoundland and Labrador

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Province of Newfoundland and Labrador

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    Bell Island

    by Jandar Written Jan 11, 2008

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    If you take a 20 min. ferry ride over to Bell Island you can tour the old iron mine. The tunnels reach 3 miles under the sea floor of Conception Bay. Hard hats needed. Pony's were used along the tunnels to pull the carts of ore. The mines closed in 1966.

    Approaching by Ferry Deep below the Ocean Iceberg off Bell Island Stop for a beer & lunch Ferry ride
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    Visit Cape Spear Newfoundland

    by crummey Updated Jul 16, 2007

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    Cape Spear is known as the most easterly point in North America.

    Cape Spear has a lighthouse perched on the cliffs, which can be seen across Spear Bay from St. John's Harbour.

    There are old fortifications at Cape Spear, which were built by the Canadian Army during World War II. They were meant to protect St. John's' harbourmouth.

    Jason Crummey: Cape Spear Gun Battery J. Crummey @ Cape Spear Gun Battery J. Crummey in a Cape Spear bunker JCrummey in a Cape Spear bunker Crummey @ Cape Spear
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    The Vikings have Landed!

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Feb 24, 2007

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    Practically within walking distance of our B&B in Saint Anthony is the second of Newfoundland's UNESCO World Heritage Sites. L'Anse aux Meadows was first visited by Europeans when a 30-man Viking ship from Greenland, captained by Leif Eriksson, landed there during a voyage of discovery to the west (1000 AD). They found the area and climate to be so hospitable that they decided to spend the winter there, before sailing back to Greenland in the spring with a load of lumber and wild grapes that they had found growing nearby (hence the name 'Vinland' in the Viking Chronicles). As word got out in Greenland, more ships sailed west and eventually the settlement consisted of 8 wood-framed huts overlaid with sod roof and walls. There are even records of the birth of the first European in the New World taking place at this location (a boy named Snorri). However, this area had also been used by the native population (called 'Skraelings' by the Vikings) since about 6000 BC. The result was eventual conflict and deaths, culminating in a retreat back to Greenland by the heavily out-numbered Vikings. L'Anse aux Meadows would gradually decay for almost 1000 years before it was once again brought back to life. Today, Parks Canada administers the site and puts on wonderful demonstrations of how life took place inside the huts. These huts had long narrow fireplaces in the middle, used for heat, light and cooking (note the roof-vent in the photo). In addition to the buildings, there are other sites that show the original foundations of other buildings. Admission is US$6 for adults, open from June 1 - Oct. 14.

    A replica Viking sod hut A Viking Lady in Sod Hut doorway
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    Gros Morne National Park

    by brazwhazz Written Feb 16, 2007

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    It is said that Gros Morne National Park is to geology what the Galapagos Islands (Ecuador) are to biology. Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site back in 1987, Gros Morne is the place where the theories of continental drift were proven.

    For the less scientific minds, Gros Morne National Park is a place of great beauty, dominated by Gros Morne Mountain. We went there for the hiking trails -- which vary in length and difficulty, providing something for all types of hikers -- but boat tours and kayaking are also quite popular in the summertime. In fact, we would have gone kayaking had the weather not been so bad on our final day in the park.

    Gros Morne National Park is also special because it encompasses a number of small towns offering a range of accommodations. (We stayed in Rocky Harbour, the largest of these towns with a population figure of around 1,000.)

    Gros Morne Mountain Village of Rocky Harbour in the distance Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse
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    Mile 1 of the Transcanada Highway

    by easterntrekker Written Jan 6, 2007

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    St John's has the distinction of being at the beginning of the Trans Canada Highway. To mark the spot they built Mile One Centre a first-class multi-purpose sports and entertainment facility in the heart of downtown St. John’s. It is home to the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL), the St. John’s Fog Devils .

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    A kitchen party

    by easterntrekker Written Jan 6, 2007

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    If you spend any time in Newfoundland at all , chances are you'll get an invitation to a "kitchen party". If you like to laugh, eat, drink and here music ...it's a must !!

    The party we went to at New Year's started out in the kitchen...( where the food was) and spilled into the living room ( where the music was)

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    ST. JOHN'S WATERFRONT

    by easterntrekker Written Jan 3, 2007

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    The harbour, located in historic downtown, has provided shelter to explorers, merchants, soldiers, pirates and mariners of all kinds over the last 500 years. It's always a bustling place and a landmark to the city. If you can brave the cold ..the fireworks on New Years Eve here are terrific!

    St John's Harbour
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    Signal Hill

    by easterntrekker Written Jan 3, 2007

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    A trip to St John's isn't complete until you drive to the top of Signal Hill. The last time we went was New Year's and it was a blustery winter day....but there .were others visiting as well and braving the elements. Signal Hill rises above the entrance of St. John's harbour and because of its strategic location, was a natural site for a signal station and fortifications protecting the harbour and city below. As early as 1704, flag signals were flown from the summit of Signal Hill to inform St. John's of approaching ships, both friendly and hostile. For me I go for the fabulous view of the city!!

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    Wild life explained

    by easterntrekker Written Jan 3, 2007

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    There is an excellent exhibit at The Rooms about native Newfoundland animals and birds. Even though I've lived in Newfoundland for a time and visited often ...I was amazed at the variety of gulls. Come face to face with a polar bear on the tundra. The snowy owl was my favorite. Great for children

    Snowy Owl
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    Visit the Rooms - St John's

    by easterntrekker Written Jan 3, 2007

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    Built in 2005 The Room's can't be missed . Oh....I mean it really sticks out and you'll ...likely ask someone " What's That" It looks like a couple of over grown wooden fish houses ...I think that was the idea. Inside however is really worth a visit. The Rooms unites the Provincial Museum, the Provincial Art Gallery and the Provincial Archives under one roof. There are ever changing visiting exhibits.
    Adults $5.00
    Free Admission
    Wednesday nights from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm & the first Saturday of every month

    View from the gallery
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    Dinner Theater in St John's

    by easterntrekker Written Jan 3, 2007

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    There are several dinner theater's to coose from . We went to The Majestic Theater and it was a good choice. "HUMBUG" is a hysterical musical comedy based on the classic Charles Dickens story, "A Christmas Carol". The singing was fantastic and so was the humour . I can't recommend it for the meal...the cod a gratin was cold and dry...but still a great night. If you go in winter wear something warm...that old building is drafty!!
    Tickets can be reserved by calling 579.3023
    Ticket price is $54.50+HST

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    L'Anse aux Meadows - NW Newfoundland

    by Redlats Updated Dec 5, 2006

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    L'Anse Aux Meadows is the first European settlement in North America. In 1000 AD, Norwegian Vikings from Greenland built a settlement of huts and a furnace to smelter ore into iron.

    The settlement was used for about ten years before being abandoned by the Vikings.

    Parks Canada recreated one of the living huts based on what was found in the ground and put on demonstrations of how life took place inside the huts.

    Because of all this it is a UNESCO World Heritage site. We found it an intensely interesting spot. You can read more about it on our detailed L'Anse aux Meadows page or on the Parks Canada website.

    L'Anse aux Meadows historic site
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    Exposed Underwater Caves

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Sep 24, 2006

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    Once we had hit the high points of Gros Morne, we continued our trip northward along the peninsula the next day, heading for Vikings and Whales at its northern tip (see my St. Anthony page!). However, only a few kilometers north of the National Park we chanced upon The Arches Provincial Park - a fine little picnic stop located beside the highway. Again, we really enjoyed the unique formations of these former underwater caves that later surfaced when the Ice Age retreated and the level of the land rebounded above the sea. It was very windy but the temperature was good as we explored among the formations. No charge to visit the site.

    Sea Caves now on the Surface A closer look at the Caves and rocky beach
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    A Huge Inland Fjord

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Sep 24, 2006

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    The Long Range Mountains comprising this peninsula of Newfoundland were formed hundreds of millions of years ago during the geological changes associated with the formation of the Earth's continents as they are presently formed. During the Ice Ages, huge glaciers carved 'fjords' with 2300-ft sheer cliffs (700-m) , like these ones, in the resulting mountain ranges. Later, as the climate warmed, the glaciers melted and the surface of the earth gradually rebounded as the great weight was removed. As a result, these fjords were cut off from the ocean itself, forming trapped bodies of water, called 'Ponds' in Newfoundland. After leaving the Tablelands, we arrived at the entrance to Westen Brook Pond and then left the car park to walk a short distance inland to the interpretive centre (3rd photo). From the centre, there is a very interesting 30-40 minute (3 km) trail walk across the now intervening lowlands before you reach the edge of the trapped fjord seen in the distance. The lowlands actually comprises a coastal bog and three small wooded limestone ridges - with various interpretive signs located at strategic intervals. If you are lucky, you may even come across a Moose feeding in the bogs!

    The boat tour cruised up the 16-km (10-mile) lake with a running commentary on the various waterfalls, cliff features and wildlife that is encountered. The second photo shows the view as we leave the far end of the lake, where a hiking trail connects to the 707-metre (2300 foot) Gros Morne Mountain in another section of the park. Herds of caribou still use the uplands of Gros Morne as their breeding ranges. Arrangements can be made to hike into or out of this spot and then use the boat tour as a one-way passage on the lake. The cold 165-m (500 ft) deep waters of the lake are home to Arctic Char, Atlantic Salmon and Brook Trout.

    The view as our tour boat enters the fjord Looking back toward the fjord entrance A half-hour trek to the 'Pond' behind us
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    A Chunk of the Earth's Crust!

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Sep 24, 2006

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    A half-hour or so after leaving Deer Lake, you will enter Gros Morne National Park, one of Canada's best. Inside the southern edge of the park is an amazing geological wonder called the Tablelands. This, in fact, was the main reason why the park was made a UNESCO World Heritage site. The Tablelands is a 260-million year old chunk of lava from the earth's crust that broke off and was thrust to the surface during collisions between the constanting moving tectonic plates in this part of the world. There are a few other places in the world that also boast similar formations, in Oman, Cyprus, Tibet and southern Chile. The rocks are composed of peridotite but, when thrust to the surface, they change to the mineral serpentine. Due to weathering effects, serpentine turns to a tan colour, giving this huge formation its distinctive look. The chemical composition of the rocks is also not very condusive to plant life, consequently it appears to be a barren moon-like surface in comparison to the surrounding spruce forests. Here, I am sitting on the back of our car at a rest-site in the Park, but we really enjoyed our drive up onto and around this amazing chunk of rock! The other photo shows how the Tablelands sticks out from the crowd when viewed from the other side of Bonne Bay.

    The Tan-coloured Tablelands Tablelands as seen from Norris Point
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Province of Newfoundland and Labrador Hotels

  • Murray Premises Hotel

    The Murray Premises is one place in St. John's I had always wondered about after trying a couple of...

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    ?? I don't know, my place is only 5 minutes away from here. Early in the 1920's Armstrong-Whitworth...

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  • Comfort Inn Gander

    112 Trans Canada Hwy, Gander, NF A1V1P8

    Satisfaction: Very Good

    Good for: Business

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Province of Newfoundland and Labrador Things to Do

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