Historic Landmarks, Halifax

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  • Historic Landmarks
    by tuff
  • Bell Tower - Halifax NS
    Bell Tower - Halifax NS
    by pieter_jan_v
  • The Sebastopol memorial
    The Sebastopol memorial
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  • tvor's Profile Photo

    St. Paul's Church

    by tvor Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    St. Paul's Anglican church, on the Grand parade, is the oldest church in Halifax and the oldest protestant church in Canada. It was built the year Halifax was founded, 1749. The building of course has been upgraded and changed a bit over the years but there are still services held in it on Sundays. It's open to the public as well.

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    Old Burying Ground

    by pieter_jan_v Written Dec 10, 2006

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    Halifax: The Old Burying Ground
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    The Old Burying Ground is the oldest cemetery of Halifax dated from 1749 and was in active servive for 95 years. Some 12,000 people were buried here although only about a thousand stones are actually at the spot.

    In 1855, the Sebastopol memorial was erected at the entrance to honour two local men, Major A.F. Welsford and Captain William Parker, both killed in the Crimean War.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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    Chapel of Our Lady of Sorrows

    by Jefie Written Sep 9, 2006

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    Our Lady of Sorrows Chapel & Holy Cross Cemetery

    This small but lovely chapel is also known as the "Church built in a day", for the simple reason that it was entirely built on August 31, 1843, thanks to the 2,000 volunteers who got together to erect this Gothic chapel in the heart of the Holy Cross Cemetery, Halifax's first Catholic cemetery. The large stained glass window dates back to 1661, while some other ornaments date back to the 16th century. The cemetery itself is also very nice and peaceful, and there are some markers pointing out to the more prominent citizens that were buried there, such as Canada's fourth Prime Minister, Sir John Thompson.

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    Historic Properties

    by victorwkf Written Jun 9, 2006

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    Historic Properties of Halifax, Nova Scotia
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    The historic properties is actually a group of restore buildings at Upper Water Street (just next to the waterfront area) built between 1800 to 1905. They are originally huge warehouses but now has been converted into shops, restaurants, bars etc. Artisans, merchants and buskers do their business around the buildings in the summer. There is a good informative signboard there where you can learn more about this historical place in Halifax.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Citadel Hill National Historic Site

    by victorwkf Written May 13, 2006

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    Citadel Hill National Historic Site, Halifax
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    This is Canada's most visited national historic site. The huge Citadel is an interestingly shaped fort on top of Halifax's big central hill which is within easy walking distance from the city. Construction of this place began in 1749 with the founding of Halifax. The final version which we see today was built from 1818 to 1861. During the summer to early autumn, there are guided tours which explain the fort and its history. As for the fort, it is opened all year round and is free, with very good views of the city and its harbour. This place is a must visit when you are at Halifax, more photographs are at the travelogue section of this VT page.

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    • Castles and Palaces
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    Historic Properties

    by tvor Updated Jul 25, 2005

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    View on the old historic warehouses

    The waterfront of Halifax has been the center and heart of the city since it was founded. The city's shipping and naval heritage contributed to the growth of Halifax significantly. Part of the waterfront contained many warehouses that were used to store and distribute good shipped in and out. In the 1960's the old buildings in disrepair were saved from destruction and renovated. They revitalized the waterfront with offices, shops and restaurants in the old buildings, now well preserved. There are about 8 buildings covering several blocks from the waterfront and back several streets, some interconnected and some free standing. A couple of newer structures added to the mix over the years that have only enhanced the area further.

    In this area you will find local crafts, books, and souvenirs, art and galleries of prints, maps, good food and and buzzing night life.

    Highly recommended for food and a great view is Salty's restaurant.

    Christmas by the Sea and a shop selling antique and new maps and prints and travel books are particularly interesting.

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    The Governor's House

    by PA2AKgirl Updated Oct 19, 2004

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    Across from St. Paul's cemetery is the Governor's House. Interestingly, the governor for whom the house was built in 1800, was an American--John Wentworth. He has a pretty detailed history himself...once as governor of New Hampshire. During this time, of course, there was conflict between England and its American Colonies so he spent the war years in exile...eventually giving up his title as governor in NH and staying loyal to England. He "escaped" to Halifax where he was appointed to governor there. The story has an equally dramatic ending, but my tip is about the house, not this guy...

    Anyway, so the Governor's House is a..."stately" structure...beautiful, really...set back from the road shaded by many trees. On the sunny day that Bobby and I were there, it looked particularly nice. It is the home of the Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia.

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    The Old Burying Ground

    by PA2AKgirl Updated Oct 19, 2004

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    who's that crazy man taking pics of himself?

    In St. Paul's cemetery, you'll find the resting place for the 1st residents of Halifax . The Old Burying Ground refers to the "acre of sleep" within the cemetery. For a number of reasons I liked this place--it has interpretive signs explaining the history of the grounds and some of the people buried here. Most of all, for lying in the middle of a city, it's in remarkable shape. I saw no litter and nothing was defaced.

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    Historic Properties get a dose of Juan too.....

    by richiecdisc Written Nov 28, 2003

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    Juan kept all tourists out this day

    Historic Properties is perhaps the city's top attraction after the Citadel. Juan seriously damaged this area and it was roped off so that tourists could not walk too closely to it. I found that there were many interesting areas of the city just as old and atmospheric and from the number of people milling around, I imagine this is a bit of a tourist trap in high season.

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    • Road Trip
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    St. Paul's Anglican Church

    by davidjoha Written Apr 20, 2003

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    a ship piece from the Halifax Explosion

    This is the oldest Protestant church in Canada. It was founded in June 1749 and its burial vault holds the remains of many illustrious British colonials of the period. Perhaps most interesting is the piece of wood embedded from the Halifax Explosion of 1917. I was there on Sunday and was able to enter the Church but could not take the tour.
    The piece of ship embedded in the ground (shown in the picture) was also from the Halifax Explosion and ended up far across town.

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    Little Dutch (Deutsch) Church

    by davidjoha Written Apr 20, 2003

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    Little Dutch (Deutsch) Church

    This was the first Lutheran Church in Canada, built in 1756. It now belongs to the Anglican Church. They still have Evening Prayer and Morning Prayer there each day. Quite by accident I was able to participate in the Evening Prayer the day I was there. It was refreshing after 3 weeks of travel and not having been able to attend a worship service.

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    • Seniors

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    Citadel Hill

    by ClassyGirl Written May 20, 2004
    [http://www.atlanticcanada.worldweb.com/]

    Unfortunately I didn't take any pictures, but my visit to Citadel Hill was extremely educational, interesting, and fun. Not to mention that the grounds are beautiful.

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    The Bell Tower

    by pieter_jan_v Written Dec 15, 2003

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    Halifax: The Bell Tower
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    The Bell Tower is one place you will see. Located at the bottom of the Citadel Hill you cannot miss it. Please use the special pedestrian crossing with traffic lights.

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    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

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    St. George's Round Church

    by davidjoha Written Apr 20, 2003

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    St. George's Round Church

    St. George's Round Church was built in 1800 to accomodate the growing congregation of the Little Dutch Church. It's structure and design are very unique.

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    Our Lady of Sorrows Chapel

    by davidjoha Written Apr 20, 2003

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    Our Lady of Sorrows Chapel

    This charming little chapel was built in just one day on August 31, 1843. I wasn't able to get there when it was open but I did walk around to see it, read about it, and take a picture.

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    • Seniors
    • Religious Travel

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