Liverpool Things to Do

  • War memorial, Liverpool, Nova Scotia.
    War memorial, Liverpool, Nova Scotia.
    by planxty
  • War memorial, Liverpool, Nova Scotia.
    War memorial, Liverpool, Nova Scotia.
    by planxty
  • War memorial, Liverpool, Nova Scotia.
    War memorial, Liverpool, Nova Scotia.
    by planxty

Best Rated Things to Do in Liverpool

  • Cashee's Profile Photo

    Privateer Days

    by Cashee Updated Mar 9, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Every year my home town has a festival when we celebrate what our town was built upon... privateering (a leagal form of piracy sanctioned by the Queen).
    People walk around in period costume (1780) and sport muskets proudly.
    There are a few notable things to attend:
    - a graveyard tour where you can learn some interesting local history
    - a historical community walk
    - a period wedding (each year, a lucky couple is chosen to share their wedding with the community and visitors)
    -a reinactment --> Americans trying to invade Liverpool harbour (Go Canada! - the Americans are no match for our muskets!)

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    Rossignol Cultural Centre

    by easterntrekker Written Sep 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Rossignol Cultural Centre is is a 24,000 sq. ft. newly renovated, multi-faceted cultural centre, featuring a variety of Museums, Art Galleries, Libraries and Wildlife.
    Hours: Mon- Sat: 10:00-5:30 (May 15 to Oct 15)
    Sunday: Noon - 5:30 p.m. (July and August only)

    Admissions: $4 adult • $3 seniors & students • Children under 6 free

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    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

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    Sherman Hines Museum of Photography

    by easterntrekker Written Sep 14, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sherman Hines is a famous photographer from Liverpool who made his mark in world circles . In the museum we were delighted to find comprehensive collections of images, cameras and artifacts from all of the key figures in the history of Nova Scotian photography – Dodge, Garber, Gavin, Gentzell, Hines, Knickle, MacAskill, Rogers, Sponagle, and many others.

    The Museum is located in the Old Town Hall.

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    W.R. MacAskill

    by easterntrekker Written Sep 14, 2008

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    W.R. MacAskill of Nova Scotia was world-renowned for his marine portraits including Gray Dawn and this scenic of Peggy's Cove. Many homes have at least one print of his works ( including ours ) There is an excellent collection of images and artifacts from this beloved Nova Scotian image-maker at the Sherman Hines Museum .
    The photgraph is of his enchanting Gray Dawn

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    • Road Trip
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture

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    Laing Art Gallery

    by easterntrekker Written Sep 15, 2008

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    This gallery features artists from across Canada . When we were there we saw the amazing work by Laurie Swim . September 1- October 15/08 -- Laurie Swim : The Quilt as Art. Laurie did much of this work since moving back home to Nova Scotia in 2004.

    This galery is a part of the The Rossignol Cultural Centre

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    Fort Point Lighthouse

    by easterntrekker Written Sep 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fort Point Lighthouse Park can be found at the end of Main Street in Liverpool. The Lighhtouse was built in 1855 and was a harbour lighthouse. Now a museum, the Lighthouse provides an interactive interpretation of life in the lighthouse and the community. Free

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    • Historical Travel

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    Astor Theater

    by easterntrekker Updated Sep 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Astor Theatre is proud to be the oldest performing arts venue in the province. In 2002 the Astor Theatre celebrated 100 years of entertainment on the South Shore of Nova Scotia.

    Built in 1902 as part of the historic Town Hall, the theatre was known as the Liverpool Opera House.This little theater always has something going on . Either live preformances from local artists or a movie. It is the Old Town Hall circa 1901.

    You can buy tickets online.

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Theater Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Hank Snow Museum

    by easterntrekker Written Sep 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Snow was born in Brooklyn, Queens County, Nova Scotia, Canada. When he was 14, he ordered his first guitar from Eaton's catalogue for $5.95, and played his first show in a church basement in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia at the age of 16. He then travelled to the nearest big city, Halifax, where he sang in local clubs and bars. We saw him years ago at the Grand Ole Oprey. The museum is worth a visit.The Centre features many famous, personal memorabilia of 'native son' HANK SNOW, including his '47 convertible Cadillac, and of various Canadian country music stars, including Carroll Baker, Wilf Carter, Ronnie Prophet, George Hamilton IV, Lucille Starr and others.
    Rates :
    Adults : $3
    Seniors : $2
    Students : $2

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Seniors
    • Women's Travel

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    Mersey river

    by easterntrekker Written Sep 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Mersey River is named after that of the River Mersey in Liverpool, England. The river proper flows from the eastern end of Eleven Mile Lake in Annapolis County southward to Kejimkujik Lake in Kejimkujik National Park, then through Lake Rossignol to empty into the Atlantic Ocean at the town of Liverpool, Nova Scotia.
    The river was a major transportation route for the Mi'kmaq people of Nova Scotia. Later, it was used to transport logs out of the interior of the province. Now, there are a number of hydroelectric projects on the river.

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    • Water Sports
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    Museum of Trapping and Mi’kmaq History

    by easterntrekker Written Sep 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This was an interesting Museum of Hunting, Fishing, Guidesports & Mi’kmaq History .There is a recreated Trapper’s Cabin from the 1930's and stories about famous wilderness guides, their paddles, gear, trophies and a photography collection of the past 100 years of hunting and fishing.

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    Two for the price of one.

    by planxty Written Oct 3, 2014

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    Close by the Fort Point lighthouse (see separate tip) I spotted a cairn style monument and, being the inquisitive (for which read nosy) that I am I went to investigate. When I looked closer I was surprised to see that the monument commemorated not one but two historical events.

    The first event was the arrival in Liverpool Harbour in 1604 of Pierre du Guast, Sieur de Monts and Samuel de Champlain, along with their crew. This was effectively the first serious attempt at colonisation of what is now Canada and was the beginning of the French / Acadian influence that exists to this day. In thruth, they did not stay in modern day Nova Scotia long as they had gone inland to found what is now Quebec by 1608.

    The second event commenorated here is a short-lived (1775 - 1783) military unit called the Kings Orange Raiders, a Loyalist Company deployed here in 1778 to guard against "American" privateers who were wreaking havoc at the time. As the plaque informs us, Fort Point was captured in 1780 due to tracehry by two KOR soldiers but was quickly recaptured under the command of a Colonel Perkins.

    It is interesting to stand here in the well-maintained park with the delightful view and think how much history has been played out here in what is not exactly a very old country. If you are historically minded and are visiting the lighthouse, it is worth a look. It is open all the time and free to visit.

    Monument, Lighthouse Park, Liverpool, Canada. Monument, Lighthouse Park, Liverpool, Canada. Monument, Lighthouse Park, Liverpool, Canada. Lighthouse Park, Liverpool, Canada. View, Lighthouse Park, Liverpool, Canada.
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  • planxty's Profile Photo

    A beautiful old lighthouse.

    by planxty Written Sep 29, 2014

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    Lighthouses seem to dominate Nova Scotia and, indeed, the other Maritime Provinces of Canada. Given the climatic conditions (in some places fog over 150 days per year), the treacherous currents, shoals etc., I suppose it is hardly surprising as these are very dangerous waters for shipping.

    The lighthouse, specifically of the old wooden and often octagonal variety are a de facto "logo" for the region and a very pretty one at that. People have lighthouse shaped mailboxes, mini lighthouses in the front garden where perhaps the British would have a garden gnome (I know which I would rather look at) and so on. Hardly surprising then that when I toured the area with VT member RavensWing in the summer of 2014 we visited a considerable number of such buildings. Funnily enough, I never seemed to get bored of them. There is something vaguely romantic (if that is the correct word) about the lighthouse keeper in his little white tower battling the elements for the good of poor sailors being wind-blown on the seas. Before I get too verbose I should really tell you about the Fort Point lighthouse which is what this tip concerns.

    This particular lighthouse lies a short drive out of Liverpool, indeed you could walk it if you liked, where the Mersey River empties into Liverpool Bay. Any similarities to the city in Northwestern England are, I am sure, entirely intended.

    We drove up and found parking easy enough in the reasonably sized carpark and a very short walk took us to the building. Built in 1855, is is slightly odd insofar as it is a square building with a pyramidal roof which is not overly common, the octagonal style being more predominant here. The state of preservation of a wooden building over 150 year old amazed me, it is in pristine condition.

    Even in the height of summer, the place was just about deserted and we were greeted in typically Nova Scotian friendly fashion by a young lady who, quite honestly, looked like she was glad of the company. She very prefessionally told us about the place and invited us to wander about at will, cautioning me to mind my head as I am rather a tall man and I do not think these places were built for people of my stature.

    Leaving the gift shop that constitutes the ground floor, we started to ascend to the upper floors which are set out really nicely. My favourite part of the whole thing was a looped video of the son of a previous keeper (the place has long been de-commissioned) telling of his early remembrances of living here. Onward and upward as always, we finally achieved the top floor where the old lens (a Fresnel I believe) was displayed and where I decided to get a bit arty as you can see in the fairly abysmal VT flag photo I tried to take. You are also quite at liberty to crank up the manual foghorn and can even buy a T-shirt procaliming that you have tooted it! I didn't bother and I did rather wonder what passing shipping must have made of a foghorn on a totally clear day.

    Realistically, it is a half hour tour here with a little extra time if you want to explore the very pleasant grounds and, no, it is not the prettiest lighthouse I saw in the area but it is certainly well worth a visit, I do recommend it as it really is rather charming.

    Regreattably, due to the nature of the building itself, it is not wheelchair accessible.

    Fort Point lighthouse, Liverpool, Canada. Fort Point lighthouse, Liverpool, Canada. View, Fort Point lighthouse, Liverpool, Canada. Fort Point lighthouse, Liverpool, Canada. Fort Point lighthouse, Liverpool, Canada.
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    • Historical Travel

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  • Cashee's Profile Photo

    Graveyard Tour

    by Cashee Written Apr 24, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    During Privateer Days (end of July), there is s graveyard tour that is fun. Tour guides take you along to tell some local history and actors pop out to sing to you, etc. It is entertaining.

    The oldest grave marker is dated 1761. It is interesting to see the different headstones and the different pictures on them (pointing hands, skull with wings, etc.)

    Related to:
    • Festivals

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  • planxty's Profile Photo

    Is this place haunted.

    by planxty Updated Sep 23, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This tip concerns the preserved home of one Simeon Perkins, judge, Assembly member and keen diarist which is adjacent to the excellent Queens County Museum in Liverpool, Nova Scotia. The building was completed in 1766 and is in a remarkable state of repair considering it is of wooden construction. It is pleasant to look at, as I hope the images show, but it is inside that the real magic lies.

    The house is exactly as it would have been in the late 18th century although with the caveat that not all of the exhibits are from the house itself but are merely representative of the period as most of the originals have been lost over the years. This is understandable and doesn't really detract from the enjoyment of the place.

    So who was this Simeon Perkins then? I must confess that prior to visiting I had never heard of the man. Well, Colonel Perkins, to give him his correct title, was born in 1735 in Connecticut (now USA) but migrated North in 1762 during the "plantation" of what is now the Maritime Provinces. Settling in Liverpool, which was then the second largest settlement in Nova Scotia after Halifax, he engaged very successfully in commerce and soon made himself what we might call "a well-respected man".

    So well respected was he that he was Lieutenant-colonel of the county militia from 1772 to 1793 and subsequently colonel commandant until 1807 despite apparently having no military training. This, of course was in the days when such ranks were effectively titular rather than requiring knowledge or martial matters. Despite his apparent lack of training, he seemed to do rather well as a commander and repulsed five separate raids by American privateers (licensed pirates effectively). He also funded his own privateers who, apart from harrying the opposing forces, managed to turn a tidy profit which he shared handsomely in.

    As if all this was not enough to keep the good Colonel occupied, he pursued a political career and in two separate periods he represented Queens County in the Nova Scotia House of Assembly for a total of 32 years. He was also a judge, justice of the peace and in all held 27 various official positions in his lifetime.

    What Perkins is perhaps best remembered for is his diary, kept from 1766 until his death which is an absolute treasure trove for historians detailing, as it does, daily life in the newly emerging "colonies". The original is held in the Queens County Museum next door.

    I mentioned haunting in the title of this tip and I have no idea if the place is genuinely haunted but it is technologically haunted now by a series of "holograms" which appear on white screens in period costume and tell you their stories. I rather liked Mary Fowler, the maid in the kitchen, who seemed a bit earthy.

    Should you decide to visit, and I suggest you do, here are the logistics.

    The house is only open June 1st - October 15th

    Monday-Saturday 9:30 am - 5:30 pm
    Sunday 1:00 pm - 5:30 pm

    Admission

    Adult - $4.00
    Family - $9.00

    Includes admission to the Queens County Museum (see separate tip on this page) and here is a little money saving tip for you. If the websites are to be believed, if you go to the Museum first you pay $5 per adult or $10 per family for admission to both places but if you go to the House first, it is $1 less. Odd I know and a minimal amount but I offer it if you are on a tight budget.

    Entry to both attractions is free to holders of the Nova Scotia Museum Pass which I recommend if you are going to be visiting a few sites as you will save a few $$$.

    Simeon Perkins House, Liverpool, Nova Scotia. Simeon Perkins House, Liverpool, Nova Scotia. Simeon Perkins House, Liverpool, Nova Scotia. Simeon Perkins House, Liverpool, Nova Scotia. Simeon Perkins House, Liverpool, Nova Scotia.
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    The Hank Snow Country Music Museum

    by CdnJane Written Jun 17, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you are interested in country music, and the Atlantic Canadian country music scene, in particular, then you'll find the museum quite interesting. Hank Snow was born near Liverpool, and the museum is in the old Railway Station.

    Railway Station - Hank Snow Country Music Centre Railway Station - Hank Snow Country Music Centre Railway Station - Hank Snow Country Music Centre
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Liverpool Things to Do

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