Safety Tips in Province of Nova Scotia

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Most Viewed Warnings and Dangers in Province of Nova Scotia

  • RavensWing's Profile Photo

    ~ You're Closed When?? ~

    by RavensWing Written Jul 9, 2014

    The Nova Scotia government has changed when some museums are open. For example I was in Granville Ferry June 22nd. I went to visit Port Royal. These are the new hours they are open

    May 16 to June 24 - 9:00 am to 5:30 pm Tuesday to Saturday closed Sunday and Monday

    June 25 to August 30 - 9:00 am to 5:30 pm daily

    August 31 to October 11 - 9:00 am to 5:30 pm Tuesday to Saturday closed Sunday and Monday

    Other museums are the same - such as Fort Anne.

    Make sure you know the hours/days they are open.

    Port Royal Fort Anne
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • planxty's Profile Photo

    Never on a Sunday (or Monday for that matter).

    by planxty Updated Jul 9, 2014

    Whilst I am loving my trip round Nova Scotia, there is one source of annoyance to me. The Province of Nova Scotia promotes tourism to a great degree and generally does it very well. There are numerous free maps, pamphlets etc., signage to sites of interest is geneagrlly good, there are a large number of Visitor Information Centres and so on. Obviously, tourism is a big part of the local economy. Why then do the Provincial Government insist on closing all their attractions on a Sunday and Monday? I understand that staff need time off etc. and the Monday closing makes perfect sense to me but if you consider that the vast majority of people work Monday to Friday then closing for 50% of your potentially most lucrative time just beggars belief. If there are not enough staff to work a shift system would Monday and Tuesday closing not be a far better idea?

    It was actually a man who worked in the tourist industry for the Provincial Government who first brought this to my attention and he was as baffled as I was not to mention pretty upset about the situation.

    I submit this tip merely to alert others to this potential hindrance to their travel plans and would urge them to check before they travel.

    The second image here shows the closed ticket office on a lovely high season (22nd June) day at one of the major tourist attractions in Nova Scotia, the Port Royal reconstruction near Annapolis Royal.

    Provincial Flag, Nova Scotia, Canada. Closed tourist attraction, Nova Scotia, Canada.
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • scottishvisitor's Profile Photo

    You may not want to leave!

    by scottishvisitor Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ah Cape Breton a place of stunning beauty with its mountains seascapes and fabulous beaches. When I first wrote the tip and put it under 'warnings of danger' I made a mistake, but did I really? Cape Breton and the Cabot Trail still today creeps back into my memory and was a place I really did not want to leave. Any re visit to Nova Scotia I may plan in the future will see me spending a lot more time in this most scenic part of Canada.

    Marbel Mountain Cape Breton by the Sea Cape Breton Hills Simply Heaven So magistic
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • 850prc's Profile Photo

    GPS may have its uses

    by 850prc Written Nov 5, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One thing we seemed to have issues with in Nova Scotia were road signs - or perhaps the lack of road signs. Confusing signage and directions dogged us on more than one occasion. We especially got into a loop on the day we visited Tatamagouche and Pugwash, and the Jost Winery. There was this "scenic drive" (and it was beautiful) that we followed, and they failed to post turns on more than one occasion.

    We stopped in at this cute little general store near Pugwash, and (exasperatedly) asked for directions. The guy helped me out, and he remarked that we were the third group of American visitors who'd stopped in for directions that very morning. We thanked him and left with a jar of local black currant jam that we purchased.

    Take a look at the photo in this tip. Doesn't it look like it doesn't really matter WHICH way you go? It was Halifax to the left and Halifax to the right. In that case, it was correct, highway 333 was a loop road. Other times, signage wasn't quite so helpful. :)

    Left or Right to Halifax?  Flip a coin.    :)

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  • cape breton Cabot trail eats little cars

    by vickiv2 Written Nov 12, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Make sure that your car/truck has a large engine and really good brakes - the Cabot trail is really punishing for a fuel efficient automatic. My car has never been the same since we did the Canot trail in it.
    If you still want to see parts of Cape Breton and avoid the trail, take the highway through the middle of the province - it's much faster and easier

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

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  • Florida999's Profile Photo

    Bad Roads

    by Florida999 Written Sep 7, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The roads in Nova Scotia are very bad in some areas once you get off the main highways. The worst sections we drove on where between Antigonish and Sydney, where I drove and average of about 25 mph. It was raining a lot, and water was standing in the road in many places, plus you couldn't see the crater sized potholes.
    There were even "flying stones" :-) Lol ! Better stones I suppose than low flying UFOs....
    We thought that sign was funny, so I took a photo. We didn't actually see any "flying stones"....

    Road sign in Nova Scotia
    Related to:
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  • easterntrekker's Profile Photo

    Look out in small town restaurants

    by easterntrekker Written Oct 16, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I don't know what it is about restaurants outside of the cities....the service is sooo slow. . Don't get me wrong . i love them all still but wow do they make you wait . It's a small town NS thing I think. It drives me nuts when i only want lunch and gotta go.. oh well a least we always have a Tim Hotons nearby to go to.

    Related to:
    • Women's Travel
    • Business Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • scottishvisitor's Profile Photo

    Black Flies they bite like the Scottish Midge

    by scottishvisitor Updated Oct 8, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When the Scots emigrated to Pictou I thought they must have brought the famous Scottish midge with them, but no, these nasty biting insects are Canadian home grown black flys = just as nasty with a lingering itch and a nasty red blemish to follow.

    Sitting outside on a summer evening OUCH!
    My husband's legs looked like chicken pox next morning! Don't wear perfume, don't sit near water and do use insect repellant I found a good one made from natural plant based ingredients.

    The Hector 1773 carried Scots to Canada
    Related to:
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    • Hiking and Walking

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  • scottishvisitor's Profile Photo

    Peggy's Cove

    by scottishvisitor Updated Oct 7, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Great place, so cool on a hot day but must be freezing when the suns not out.
    Wear sensible shoes, we saw lots of people wearing flip flops and even high heels.
    Watch out for your children, I know they have a natural tendency to run about, but slipping on these huge rocks doesn't bear thinking about.

    Smooth hard rocks
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • tvor's Profile Photo

    Speed Limits and laws

    by tvor Written Nov 4, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In Nova Scotia it is mandatory to wear your seat belt in a vehicle. There is a fine if you get caught without it buckled.

    Baby seats and booster seats for children under 60 pounds.

    Speed and distances are posted and measured in Kilometers. Maximum speed on 100 series highways is 110 KPH, some may only be 100 KPH. Smaller secondary highways will be 80-90 KPH.

    The highways and rural roadways are patrolled by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP).

    In many places you may turn right after a full stop at a red light. It will be posted if you are not allowed to do this.

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  • slippery slopes

    by arasnosliw Written Nov 1, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I'm what I'd like to call a human monkey. I have to climb things, I'm nimble, and I have lice....ehh forget that last part.

    The rugged coastline at Peggy's Cove was like a playground for me. Lots of huge granite boulders to frolick about on. Only problem was that I was being careless and had some shoes on with minimum traction. Needless to say, I took a bad spill and scraped myself up. Be careful when climbing around these boulders, even if you are a monkey girl like me.

    watch your footing

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