Yarmouth Things to Do

  • Sea Captains Walk
    Sea Captains Walk
    by RavensWing
  • Sea Captains Walk
    Sea Captains Walk
    by RavensWing
  • Sea Captains Walk
    Sea Captains Walk
    by RavensWing

Most Recent Things to Do in Yarmouth

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    ~ Yarmouth County Museum ~

    by RavensWing Updated Apr 22, 2015

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    If you have time during the Sea Captains Walk stop in here at the Yarmouth County Museum. There is a lot of history stored in this once before Tabernacle Congregational Church - but became the home to the Yarmouth County Museum in 1969. There is over 12,000 sq feet in this museum - there is so much to see.

    Depending on what type of Museum person you are, will determine how long it will take to get through the Museum. If you read all the history - plan to be there for at least 2 hours. If you skim the history and just peek at the exhibits it won't take nearly as long.

    There are many permanent exhibits to view - From glassware, to toys, Mi'kmaq to the Acadians, many of the industries of the time, wartime history, ships, music and more.

    The permanent collection also has many to view - Costumes, Musical instruments, electric car, runic stones, and even some mystery items. I was not able to guess the mystery item, although after you've tried there's a small information pamphlet that tells you how it works and what it's for.

    There's a gift shop for your perusal. If you find something you like and don't have room for it in your luggage, they do offer to ship it for you - at a cost.

    The staff is very friendly and helpful. We had to wait for our tour guide to see the Pelton-Fuller House which was no problem, we just took more time viewing the beautiful exhibits.

    Click here for the Open Times and Fees

    Yarmouth County Museum Locksmith Mystery Item Captains Office Lighthouse Bulb
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    ~ Step Back in Time ~

    by RavensWing Updated Apr 22, 2015

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    Welcome to the Pelton-Fuller House. This is where Alfred C. Fuller and his wife Mary lived - in the summer as this is their summer home. Alfred C Fuller would soon become famous for his fuller Brushes. I'm sure everyone has one or more of his brushes throughout their lifetime.

    This house has been decorated in the period of the late 1800's early 1900's. The house had full time residents in it until 1965, and then became their summer home.

    The house was donated to the Yarmouth County Historical Society, by Mrs Fuller. There were over 85% of the furniture, knick-knacks and memorabilia in the donation.

    To get a tour in the Pelton-Fuller House you'll need to make arrangements at the Yarmouth County Museum (right next door) as this is locked until there is interest in a tour. Usually a summer student is your guide.

    Your ticket is purchased at the Yarmouth County Museum

    The museum is only opened in the summer June through September - and sometimes by appointment only.

    Fuller Brushes Drawing Room Dining Room Living Room Mosaic Bathroom
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    ~ Red Fire Engine ~

    by RavensWing Written Apr 22, 2015

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    Who doesn't love when the firefighters show up to put out a fire? Well me if it's my house burning down, but otherwise they sure are some nice eye candy.

    Heading to the Firefighters Museum you get to see some pretty Red Fire Engine candy. They have vehicles from the 1800's to the 1930's. There is even one you can climb on - although it is for children. But maybe if you are a child at heart you might be able to fit in the drivers seat.

    There main floor consists of mostly old fire trucks, a typical 'fire' office and a room with different old communication methods.

    Upstairs there is more legacy equipment. There's actually a pump that requires 8 men - 4 on each arm. I can't remember offhand how many liters were pumped out per second, but it was a lot. Along the stairs there are pictures of past firefighters, and even a list for the fallen comrades.

    This is a cute little museum, I'm glad we went in to visit it. If you have purchased the Museum Pass you are admitted FREE. Otherwise to find the current prices Click here

    Typical Office 1935 Pumper Locked Boxes Early Firefighting Equipment Early Firefighting Equipment
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    ~ Stroll the Streets of Yarmouth ~

    by RavensWing Written Apr 21, 2015

    What better than a sunny day and a historical walk? Pick up the brochure for the Sea Captains Walk at the Visitor Center and you'll find the first of twenty-eight Sea Captains homes.

    Look for the various architecture on the houses - from wrap-around balconies to goth peaks. It's amazing how the owners have kept the original architecture looking so beautiful.

    This walk takes anywhere from an hour to 4 hours. If you stop in at the museums on the way - plan for the longer time. If not then the 4km (2.5 mile) walk can be done pretty quickly.

    Sea Captains Walk Sea Captains Walk Sea Captains Walk Sea Captains Walk Sea Captains Walk
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    ~ Rudders Seafood Restaurant ~

    by RavensWing Written Aug 30, 2014

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    It was a quick stop into the Restaurant/Pub. It was incredibly busy in the restaurant. Apparently one of the ships from Maine was in port and that was where many of the customers came from.

    Rudders has their own microbrewery, brewed on site, they are the only brewery on the South Shore. They offer their beers on tap.

    They also have live entertainment most nights. There was a band setting up towards the end of our visit. We had left before they started to play though.

    Rudders Rudders
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    ~ Yarmouth Pub ~

    by RavensWing Written Aug 30, 2014

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    Just as we were leaving Rudders Seafood Restaurant and Pub --- well you'll never guess what Planxty (Fergy) spotted another pub, right across the street. I wasn't sure this would be a good place to go. It looked pretty small and no one really in there.

    Turned out this was one of my favorite nights of the whole trip. The locals were so incredibly friendly. They were playing a song that Planxty (Fergy) knew and he started singing along with the others. The girls managed to talk the bartender into turning on the karaoke machine and the real fun began. Planxty ended up singing pretty much all night long. The girls would say to him 'What song do you want to sing next', not 'did you want to sing again'. They just loved his singing.

    The staff and the locals were wonderful. I truly enjoyed my time in the small pub. I would certainly go back again.

    Yarmouth Pub Pub Entrance Bar Seating area Planxty Enjoying some Draft
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    A proper time capsule.

    by planxty Written Aug 29, 2014

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    I have written a separate tip about the excellent Yarmouth County Museum and adjacent to it is the equally fascinating, if somewhat smaller, Pelton - Fuller House which as the title of this tip suggests is a proper time capsule of a bygone age.

    The house was initially built in 1892 for a prominent local merchant named Edward Cann who subsequently sold it to a couple called Bown in 1910 and it subsequently passed to their daughter Susan who was married to a Judge Pelton. The Peltons daughter, Mary Primrose, married a man called Alfred C. Fuller and the house eventually came into their possession although Mrs. Pelton lived there until her death in 1965 when it became a summer residence for the younger couple.

    If you are from North America and think you have heard of Alfred C. Fuller you would probably be right. As a millionaire businessman he was known as the "Fuller Brush Man" as he had made his fortune from household cleaning equipment and his story is a classic rags to riches tale. Born in nearby Welsford, Nova Scotia into a large farming family, young Fuller decided he wanted more out of life and moved to Boston in the USA aged just 18 in search of a better life. After a series of menial jobs, he found himself selling brushes door to door for a man called Staples. Whilst a reasonable salesman, he thought that the products themselves could be much improved as could the selling techniques and that is what he set about doing. With his boss unimpressed by his ideas, Fuller borrowed $375 and began his own brush making company in 1906. Always an industrious man, he worked long hours and in the first year of business the company turned a profit of $8500.

    Realising he needed to expand he began franchising his businesses and soon had 270 salesmen working for him on a commission only basis. The "Fuller Brush Men" as they were soon known were a common sight and Walt Disney even cast Donald Duck as one! The Fuller Brush company went from strength to strength to the point that it had a $109 million profit in 1960. Not bad and it was once claimed that every household in North America had at least one Fuller product although that may just be a myth.

    Alfred Fuller died in 1973 but his widow continued to use the house until 1994 when she gifted the house and most of it's contents to the very active local Historical Society and it is this virtually untouched time capsule that the visitor sees today. It really is quite fascinating.

    If you visit the house, you will be shown round by a knowledgeable young guide, the price of the tour being part of a combined ticket you buy at the Museum. The house is only open from June through September and a combined adult ticket is $5 with the usual concessions available.

    Pelton - Fuller House, Yarmouth, Canada. Pelton - Fuller House, Yarmouth, Canada. Pelton - Fuller House, Yarmouth, Canada. Pelton - Fuller House, Yarmouth, Canada. Pelton - Fuller House, Yarmouth, Canada.
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    Another link to the sea.

    by planxty Written Aug 29, 2014

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    It is impossible to overstate the importance of the sea to the Eastern seaboard of Canada and, indeed, the Maritime Provinces are so named for a reason. For this reason it is no surprise to see so many marine related memorials, many of them very tragic and commemorating thise who have no grave but the sea. This tip refers not deceased mariners but rather is a celebration of the proud sea-faring traditions of the area. In fact, so important is the sea to Yarmouth that in the mid 19th century it was the second largest port of registration in Canada.

    The siting of the commoemorative monument may at first appear to be a little strange as it overlooks the sea apparently pretty much in the middle of nowhere but it is there for a reason as this was the site of the first ever ship launch in Yarmouth County as far back as 1764. It is a relatively simple stone cairn with a plaque and two anchors but it is imacculately kept and is wroth stopping off to see if you are passing.

    Seafarers Memorial, Yarmouth, Canada. Seafarers Memorial, Yarmouth, Canada.
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    For those in peril on the sea.

    by planxty Written Aug 29, 2014

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    I have mentioned in other tips on my VT pages that the sea is a cruel mistress and particularly so in the waters around Nova Scotia as various sailors memorials bear witness. A combination of fog, shoals, currents and just about everything else not good for sailing make these waters abolute ship-killers. It comes as no surprise then to find lighthouses dotted frequently along the coast to the extent they have almost becom the unofficial "trademark" of the Province. Indeed, many people even have model lighthouses in their front gardens.

    Many of these extremely functional buildings are also extremely attractive to look at, especially the older wooden ones with the distinctive octagonal design. I would not describe the light at Cap Forchu as being overly attractive but rather as rather impressive at 75 feet with it's applecore style. You can see it for miles around on a clear day and if you ever get up close to it, you will see what I mean.

    Although Yarmouth has a much longer history of seafaring, the first lighthouse here was not constructed until 1839 and first lit in early 1840. It was even taller than the modern structure at 91 feet. In 1869 a foghorn was added. The day we visited it was damp and foggy and the need for both light and horn was very obvious. Hopefully, the images give some impression. By 1962 the old wooden station had come to the end of it's working life and was replaced by the concrete structure you see now at a cost of $66,000. It continued, staffed by two keepers until 1993 when it was fully automated. Shortly after that time many lighthouses were being decommissioned and so a society was formed to preserve Cape Forchu. It administers it to this day and runs the small but interesting museum, gift shop and the "Mug Up" tearoom, all of which are located in the old keepers quarters. Due to issues of space, visitors cannot actually ascend the lighthouse itself.

    A popular pastime is to go scrambling on the rocks around the Cape but I would issue a word of warning here. The rocks can be extremely slippery as they were on the day of my visit and rogue waves can have fatal results as the rather sad memorial to two young girls lost in that way in 1991 testifies.

    Incidentally, if you are wondering what Cape (or Cap) Forchu means, it is French / Acadian for forked cape.

    During the summer season, the facilities are open from 1200 - 1900 daily. Admission is free but donations are obviously welcome.

    Lighthouse, Cape Forchu, Canada. Lighthouse, Cape Forchu, Canada. Lighthouse, Cape Forchu, Canada. Lighthouse, Cape Forchu, Canada. Lighthouse, Cape Forchu, Canada.
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    Lost to the Sea.

    by planxty Written Aug 29, 2014

    It is said that the sea is a cruel mistress and nowhere is this more true than in the often treacherous waters off Canada's Eastern seaboard where, over centuries, many ships have foundered and many people perished. It comes as little surprise then when you see the "Lost to the Sea" memorial facing out over the Bay of Fundy in Yarmouth.

    It is a relatively new memorial having only been unveiled in 2013 although planning had been underway for some years before that. The extremely active Yarmouth Historical Society had a large part to play in getting the project off the ground under the supervision of a separate memorial committee. It is very sobering to stand at the memorial and read the hundreds of names inscribed on it.

    There are fairly strict criteria as to whose names are on the memorial which are as follows :-

    Be born in Yarmouth County or a resident of Yarmouth County
    Drowned in salt water
    Ship is missing - entire crew lost
    Fell overboard and drowned
    Killed by an accident while on board a ship at sea
    Killed in a mutiny
    Died of disease while on a ship
    Died at sea or in a foreign port (having arrived there on a ship)
    Died of wounds while serving on a ship, or with a connection to the ocean

    When I read this I could not help but wonder how many residents had been lost to mutiny, I didn't think it was that common.

    I found the memorial itself aesthetically pleasing with the ships wheel water feature and so on but I do think the siting of it leaves a little to be desired in front of that rather ugly concrete wall. Still, I suppose it is the sentiment of the thing that is important here.

    Well worth a quick stop if you are passing.

    Lost to the Sea memorial, Yarmouth, Canada. Lost to the Sea memorial, Yarmouth, Canada.
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    Where's the fire?

    by planxty Written Jul 30, 2014

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    I know that many small boys are said to want to be firefighters when they grow up, although I must confess it was never an ambition of mine. I do, however, love museums and so when I read about the Nova Scotia Firefighters Museum in Yarmouth I just had to pay a visit. Actually on the day we visited a fire would not have stood much of a chance as it was raining hard and I suggest you keep this place "in reserve" for the days when the weather is inclement as it can be even in the height of summer.

    We were greeted by an extremely friendly young lady and even with the bad weather and being in peak tourist season we had the place to ourselves so we set about exploring and there is certainly plenty to explore. Apart from an excellent selection of beautifully restored appliances dating back to the 18th century there is a recreated watchroom, a section dealing with a fire alarm system which used to be in place in the town and much more associated firefighting memrobilia like sporting trophies and the like.

    I would say that the "engines" are the star attraction and although most museums forbid you to even touch the exhibits there is one appliance here which you are encouraged to get on for a wonderful photo opportunity. You can see the result in one of the images on this page, I just could not resist the chance of a VT flag photo. I have put the word "engines" in inverted commas as many of them pre-date the use of internal combustion for motor vehicles and were reliant on horse or even manpower for propulsion.

    If you do decide to visit, and I suggst you do, here are the logistics.

    The Museum is open Mon-Sat: 8:00am - 5:00pm and Sunday: 10:00am - 5:00pm year round. Admission charges are

    Adult - $4.00
    Youth (6-17) - $2.00
    Children (under 6) - Free
    Seniors(65 +) - $3.00
    Family - $8.00

    I should mention that your Nova Scotia Museum pass (see separate tip on my Nova Scotia page) is valid here.

    The premises is wheelchair accessible.

    Firefighters Museum, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. Firefighters Museum, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. Firefighters Museum, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. Firefighters Museum, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. Firefighters Museum, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.
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    Food miles? More like food yards.

    by planxty Written Jul 28, 2014

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    OK, I know technically beer isn't a food but everyone talks about food miles these days (i.e. the distance from point of production to point of sale) and by that reckoning if beerwas regarded as a food then Rudder's restaurant and brewpub scores very highly as they produce much of the beer onsite. In fact, they score very highly on the real food as well as the menu is predominantly fish and seafood which is all very locally sourced, indeed the premises is right by the water and a stone's throw from the harbour.

    We did not eat there but a quick pint of the Rudder's Red was so pleasant that I felt compelled to have a go at the Raspberry Blonde. I have drunk fruit flavoured beers before, particularly in Belgium where they are popular, but this was the first time I had had a raspberry beer and very good it was too. The other brews available are a blonde, a brown ale, a seasonal heavy and Pompey Dick, a rather potent (7%) brew produced to honour the ship of that name which brought the first settlers to the town.

    The staff here were extremely friendly, which I have found to be a feature just about everywhere in the Maritime provinces. We visited in the early evening and the place was fairly well full with most people obviously having booked in advance which I would suggest you do. However, simply to sit at the pleasant bar for a drink is a delightful experience in itself. As you might imagine, the decor is nautically themed and the bar has a a very cosy atmosphere. They have retained many of the original features from the warehouse premises that it used to be and whch dates from the mid 19th century. Weather permitting, you may prefer to sit on the deck with wonderful views over the harbour and watch the fishing boats come and go. If you happen to have your own boat then the pub even has it's own marina onsite!

    They have regular live entertainment in Rudders and although we did not stay to see them, I did have a bit of a chat with the band who were setting up and they were every bit as friendly as the staff.

    This is an excellent place and I do recommend it.

    Rudder's brewpub, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. Rudder's brewpub, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. Rudder's brewpub, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada.
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    Fancy a game of pool?

    by planxty Written Jul 27, 2014

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    I don't know what it is like where you live but certainly in the UK pool halls have something of a seedy reputation and are generally not places I hang about in. Don't get me wrong, I don't mind a "rough" pub but I am not that good at pool anyway. Being a bit thirsty, whch is my default position, I was a little surprised when my (female) friend suggested popping in there for a drink but I am never one to turn down a beer and so in we went.

    It was very clean and tidy with a good number of pool tables and probably an even greater number of the ubiquitous gaming machines whch seemed to be getting more patronage than the green baize. We were greeted by the very friendly barmaid and almost immediately engaged in conversation by the equally friendly customers sitting at the bar. I know I have mentioned it in many other tips here on VT but the Nova Scotians really are a sociable bunch. As it so happened the football (soccer) World Cup was on the TV so that at least gave me a topic of conversation. Had it been baseball or hockey I would have struggled!

    I have subsequently found out that Dooly's is a franchise chain comprising 61 outlets over seven Provinces and you do tend to see them in most major towns in the Maritimes. They began reatively recently (1993) in New Brunswick and seem to have grown fairly fast.

    There was a snack and full menu available although we did not eat there. The washrooms were clean and there was a small display cabinet with a few trophies.

    If you are in Yarmouth then this is not a bad place for a drink.

    Dooly's pool bar, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. Dooly's pool bar, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. Dooly's pool bar, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. Dooly's pool bar, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada.
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    Lest we forget.

    by planxty Written Jul 27, 2014

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    Readers of many of my other pages will know that I have an interest in military graves and war memorials and I will generaly stop to have a look at any I pass. I also write tips here about them which are often pretty short as there is not really much to say about them because everyone knows what they are and what they represent. I make no apology, however, for including them here as I feel it is important that we remember the ultimate sacrifices made by those that went before us and, indeed, are still being made.

    This particular memorial was brought abut by pressure from the women of the County who started lobbying for it in 1920 and by 1923 when it was unveiled they had raised over $10,000 by public subscription. Initially there were 173 name inscribed, the fallen of the First World War and subsequently those who perished in the Second World War and the Korean War were added. There is one fairly recent looking plaque with two names which I presume must be from some other theatre of operations perhaps Afghanistan.

    Apologies for there being rather too much of my reflection in some of the images, it was just the position of the sun when I was there and unavoidable.

    War Memorial, Yarmouth,Nova Scotia, Canada. War Memorial, Yarmouth,Nova Scotia, Canada. War Memorial, Yarmouth,Nova Scotia, Canada. War Memorial, Yarmouth,Nova Scotia, Canada.
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    A wonderful local Museum.

    by planxty Written Jul 25, 2014

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    Yarmouth today is a fairly sleepy place which appears to be mostly geared toward tourism but it was not always so. It has a history stretching back to the original Mi'kmaq aboriginal ppeople who populaced the area. Later on the French and British fought over possession of the whole region including the settlement here but it was really in the 19th and very early 20th centuries that the town really flourished. This was predominantly due to the "Age of Sail" when the shipbuilding and seafaring professions brought wealth and employment. This resulted in the many wonderful buildings you can see everywhere and I suggest you do the sef-guided tour (see separate tip on this page).

    All of this is recorded in the rather wonderful Yarmouth County Museum situated in what is itself a rather fine building which was formerly the Tabernacle Church. It is on the walking tour mentioned above and really is worth stopping off to visit. When we entered the Museum we were greeted by a typically friendly gentleman, a lifelong resident of the town, who was extremely knowledgeable about both the Museum and the history of the local area. This added much to the visit. Despite being in the height of tourist season we had the place to ourselves which I thought was a bit of a shame as it deserves to be patronised more.

    Given the maritime nature of Yarmouth it is hardly surprising that a good proportion of the artefacts on display are of a shibuilding or seagoing nature and among my favourite items of that nature was a huge Fresnel lighthouse lens which serves as something of a logo for the Museum, appearing on some of the T-shirts in the well-stocked giftshop. There is much more to the Museum than that though and there is a fairly eclectic range of exhibits. One of my favourites was the dolls house (pictured) which was whittled from cigar boxes.

    Perhaps the "star" exhibit is the so-called Runic Stone (also pictured) whch has caused debate amongst experts since it's "discovery" in 1812. It is a large lump of rock with what appear to be ancient runes inscribed on it. Some claim it is merely natural markings, others that it is proof positive that Lief Ericson and his Vikings visited here long before Cabot, Cartier et al and still others that it is nothing more than an elaborate hoax. I shall leave the reader to draw their own conclusions.

    The Museum is run by the local Historical Society which has been going since 1935 and is obviusly a work of love albeit that it lacks the fine exhibits of large metropolitan Museums. What it does is provide a glimpse into the life of a very local area and it does it very well. I do recommend that you visit.

    If you do decide to visit, here are the technical details.

    The Museum is open

    June 1 - September 30
    Mon-Sat: 9am-5pm
    Sunday: Closed

    October 1 - May 30
    Tues-Sat: 2pm-5pm

    Admission is $3 for adults, $2:50 for seniors, $1 for students, 50c for children and $6 for a family. There are also combination tickets for the Museum and the adjacent Pelton-Fuller House whch will form the basis of a separate tip.

    County Museum, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. County Museum, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. County Museum, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. County Museum, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. County Museum, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada.
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