Algonquin Provincial Park Sports & Outdoors

  • Tourists paddling out for the experience
    Tourists paddling out for the experience
    by CdnJane
  • People renting and returning canoes
    People renting and returning canoes
    by CdnJane
  • Sports & Outdoors
    by CdnJane

Best Rated Sports & Outdoors in Algonquin Provincial Park

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    Canoeing is a great sport

    by richiecdisc Updated Nov 9, 2003

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    Kevlar Ultralight in good ligh

    There is no other water vessel quite like a canoe and it is the traditional one in this neck of the woods. It may lack the stability of a kayak but in gentle waters, you have more freedom to get in and out and even just eat in your boat if you like.

    Equipment: There are many different types of canoes suitable for varrying conditions. But for portaging, a light one is best like the Kevlar Ultralight.

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    Comfy Portaging

    by epicult Updated Nov 18, 2005

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    Note the life jacket

    Portaging a 45-60 pound canoe, along with a 40-50 pound pack, can be pretty hard work. This is especially true when you've got 6-7+ KM's of portaging to accomplish a day for 4 or 5 days.

    It's very easy to become fatigued during a canoe trip and a good portion of that fatigue comes from the canoe resting (and/or grinding) your shoulders while you make your way through trails that are in various states of upkeep. Below are a couple of tips to help make your portaging experience as painless as possible.

    Equipment: Rent or purchase a life jacket ($30-50 CA dollars for a decent one) that has generous padding in the shoulder area. You would not believe the difference this makes, especially the next day!

    If you don't have a well padded life jacket, try folding a mid-heavy weight fleece over your shoulders and resting the yoke of the canoe on it. Using a sweater is not quite as good as a padded life jacket, but it's certainly better than bare wood abusing your shoulders all day.

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    Whiskey Rapids Trail

    by sim1 Updated Nov 27, 2003

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    Whiskey Rapids Trail at Algonquin Park


    This is a hike that is quite different from the other hikes I've done so far in the park. All the hike visit lakes, ponds and bogs, but this trail leads you along the Oxtongue River and visits the scenic Whiskey Rapids. From there it is back into the forest and the hike returns to the parking lot. The hike is quite short 2.1 kilometers and quite easy to do. Only the start of the hike goes quite steep downhill, and the last bit of the hike goes uphill again. So actually only the last bit is tiring to do. During your hike you can read all about the ecology and history of an Algonquin river.

    Because it's a short hike and not that difficult, don't expect to be the only one on the trail. A fun thing to do is bring a towel, because just after the rapids there is a nice spot to swim in the river and cool of on a hot summers day.


    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:15:18:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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    Hardwood Lookout Trail

    by sim1 Updated Jun 24, 2003

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    Hardwood Lookout Trail in Algonquin Park


    The second interpretive trail along highway 60 is the Hardwood Lookout Trail. It's located at km 13.8km and it is a short hike of 0.8km (1 hour). The trail is moderate in difficulty.
    This short hike introduces you to the ecology of a typical Algonquin hardwood forest and culminates in a fine view of Smoke Lake and the surrounding hills.


    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address... hahaha, it's a bit long! But it will bring you right to the guide bood you are looking for :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:10:14:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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    Mizzy Lake Trail

    by sim1 Updated Jun 24, 2003

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    Mizzie Lake Trail in Algonquin Park


    I've hiked the Mizzy Lake Trail and it is absolutely a fantastic hike to make. The trail is located at km 15.4 from the West Entrance on highway 60. The trail is 11km long and it will take you about 6 hours to finish. That's including all the wildlife watching you will do on this hike :-) The hike is a moderate in difficulty to do.

    The reason why I love this hike so much is because it is designed to watch wildlife, and I saw an amazing amount on my hike. And I think if I started earlier in the day with this hike I would have seen lots and lots more.
    The trail visits nine ponds and small lakes and affords some of the best chances to see wildlife in the Parkway Corridor. Dogs are not permitted on the trail because they might scare away the wildlife.

    You can see an impression of this hike on my 'must see activities'.


    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:10:14:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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    Peck Lake Trail

    by sim1 Updated Jun 24, 2003

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    Peck Lake Trail


    The Peck Lake Trail is another short hike of 1.9 kilometers (1 hour). It is moderate in difficulty.
    This trail circumnavigates the shoreline of Peck Lake. The trail guide explores the ecology of a typical Algonquin lake.


    You can order the interpretive trail guide on the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:10:14:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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    Track and Tower Trail

    by sim1 Updated Jun 24, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Track and Tower Trail in Algonquin Park


    The next trail you'll find on your way through the park is the Track and Tower Trail. I did this hike in the winter and phew it is much harder to walk through all that snow than it is to hike in the summer! Hahaha, it's very cold but also fun though! The trails are maintained very well in the winter and if you aren't scared of a bit of cold and snow you really should try and do this. I didn't have any snowshoes with me, and I actually didn't need them either. But there are plenty of places around where you can rent them if you would like to.
    The trail is located at km 25km from the west entrance of the park and it is 7.7kilometers long. The hike will take you approximately 3 hours to do and it is moderate in difficulaty. I really would love to do this hike again, but than in the summer to see the how it looks at that time of the year. The looped trail features a spectacular lookout over Cache lake, when I was there it was all frozen. I wonder how it would look in the spring or summer. There is an optional 5.5 km side trip follows an abandoned railway to Mew Lake.

    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:10:14:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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    Hemlock Bluff Trail

    by sim1 Updated Jun 24, 2003

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    Hemlock Bluff Trail


    The Hemlock Bluff Trail is 3.5 kilometers long and takes about 2 hours to complete. The hike is moderate in difficulty and takes you through a mixed forest to an impressive view of Jack Lake. You can find this trail at 27.2 kilometers after entering the west gate of the park.


    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:10:14:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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    Bat Lake Trail

    by sim1 Written Jun 24, 2003

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    Bat Lake Trail


    The Bat Lake Trail is a looped trail, moderate in difficulty. This hike will introduce you to the basic park ecology. You'll see a beautiful hemlock stand, a fine lookout and acidic Bat Lake. The hike is 5.6 kilometers long and will take 2.5 hours to complete.

    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address... hahaha, it's a bit long! But it will bring you right to the guide bood you are looking for :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/fi=products/st=db/co=1/sp=pub_results/sf=category/se=Park%20Trail%20Guides/op=rm/nu=0/ml=5/tf=description/to=x/se=1/sf=inactive/op=ne/va=category_name=Park%20Trail%20Guides.html

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    Two Rivers Trail

    by sim1 Updated Jun 24, 2003

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    Two Rivers Trail at Algonquin Park


    Just across the road from the huge campground of 'Two Rivers' is the Two Rivers Trail. The hike is 2.1 kilometers long, moderate in difficulty and will take about 1 hour to finish. I think I've done this hike on my first visit to Algonquin in 1997, but to be honest... I can't remember that much about it. All that I recall is that it wasn't that hard to do and not very spectacular. But I could be totally off with this one though, hahaha, my memory of that hike has faded a lot.

    The looped trail includes an easy climb to a pine-clad cliff.

    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:15:18:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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    Centennial Ridges Trail

    by sim1 Updated Jun 24, 2003

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    Centennial Ridges Trail at Algonquin Park


    The Centennial Ridges Trail is a hike that is on my wishlist of hikes I would love to do. It sounds like a beautiful hike to me. The trail is located at km 37.6 from the West entrance of the park and is 10 kilometers long. The hike is strenuous and together with the hot weather I had... hahaha, and to be honest, also my bad condition.... have stopped me from doing this hike this time around. But next time I am going to hike it for sure!
    It is a demanding loop but it has some spectacular viewing along two high ridges.

    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address... hahaha, it's a bit long! But it will bring you right to the guide bood you are looking for :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:5:9:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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    Lookout Trail

    by sim1 Updated Jun 24, 2003

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    Lookout Trail at Algonquin Park


    A short hike at 39.7 kilometer from the west gate of Algonquin Park is the Lookout Trail. It is moderate in difficulty and should take 1 hour to do.
    This trail is relatively steep and rugged but affords the hike with a magnificent view of several hundred square kilometres of Algonquin.
    Don't confuse this hike with the Hardwood Lookout Trail which is located at km 13.8km. I find these two names so similar that they are easy to mix up.

    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:10:14:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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    Booth's Rock Trail

    by sim1 Updated Nov 26, 2003

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    Booth's Rock Trail at Algonquin Park


    I really enjoyed doing the Booth's Rock Trail which is located at km 40.5 from the west entrance of Algonquin Park. The hike is 5.1 km long and takes about 2 hours to do. The brochure says it a moderate hike to do, but the trail guide classifies it as difficult. I wouldn't say this hike is difficult to do, but the first part is quite tiring because it is a long climb uphill. But when you've done that the view is fantastic! You are now 120 meters above the lake standing at a cliff. Beware though if you go in the afternoon that the sun will be coming from that direction, so taking photos is very hard to do as you have to take pictures into the sunlight. I didn't know this before I started the hike, so of course I found out to late.... when I was standing on top of the cliff. The view still was great though, but you better do the hike early morning or toward the late afternoon.
    This trail also visits two lakes.The returning part of the hike is very easy to walk. First down from the cliff with a couple of stairs and than along the lakeshore on an abandoned railway, so that means smooth walking :-)

    You can see an impression of this hike on my 'must see activities'.

    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:5:9:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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    Spruce Bog Boardwalk

    by sim1 Updated Jun 24, 2003

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    Spruce Bog Boardwalk at Algonquin Park


    The Spruce Bog Boardwalk is a very easy hike to do. Hahaha you could almost walk it on high heals, LOL.The hike is 1.5 kilometers long and half of the trail is boardwalk. The first part of the trail I enjoyed, with a nice pond with lots of waterlillies. The amazing thing to see after that was that there were whole trees growing on a bog, so kind of floating on water. The second part of the hike is quite boring and even leads you next to the busy highway 60 which doesn't really add to the charm of the hike.

    The several boardwalk sections in the looped trail give you a close-up look of two typical northern black spruce bogs. If you have to choose out of any of the Algonquin Park trails, I have to admit I wouldn't choose this one. But I can see some situations that this might be a great hike. If you only have a very short stay in the park and do want a quick impression of the park, or maybe have kids with you and can't go on a long and more demanding hike, this is a great hike for you to do.

    You can see an impression of this hike on my 'must see activities'.

    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:15:18:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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    Beaver Pond Trail

    by sim1 Written Jun 24, 2003

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    Beaver Pond Trail at Algonquin Park


    The Beaver Pond Trail is quite a short hike; 2 kilometers, but one I enjoyed quite a bit. It will take about 1 hour to complete the hike. The hike has views of two beaver ponds, the first one didn't really appeal to me, but the second one is beautiful! I really loved sitting here for a while, look at the beaverdam, the wildflowers and of course the beautiful lake that is here because of the hard work of the beavers. The trail is short but does know a few climbs up hill which makes it a bit tiring to do. Hahaha, but it's only 2 kilometers so nothing to really worry about. It ends in a lookout point, but not a very high one. It's a nice view, but not spectacular. On this hike I saw a snapping turtle, wow, these turtles are big! And besides that I saw a very tiny garter snake who seemed very afraid of me :-)

    You can see an impression of this hike on my 'must see activities'.

    The guide book is available at the beginning of the hike. If the box is empty you can always pick up a copy at the visitor centre. Another option is to order the interpretive trail guide online at the "friends of Algonquin" website for CAD 0,47. Here is the address :

    http://store.algonquinpark.on.ca/cgi/algonquinpark/scan/MM=c849d16ca967c79fcb2ad816ce649554:0:4:5.html?mv_more_ip=1&mv_nextpage=pub_results&mv_arg=

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Algonquin Provincial Park Sports & Outdoors

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