Algonquin Provincial Park Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
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  • Warnings and Dangers
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  • I Know this Plant & So Should You!
    I Know this Plant & So Should You!
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Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Algonquin Provincial Park

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    this little chipmunk....

    by richiecdisc Written Nov 9, 2003

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    he looks innocent but he is most surely not

    You may think you are hanging your food to keep it from bears, but actually it is to keep it from all kinds of critters. The most relentless are the chipmunks. This little guy came up for this photo and totally expected some payment for his services. When we gave none, he made every effort to get some on his own. It was amazing that this little varmint could cover so much ground so quickly. One second, he would be far across the camp and the next, crawling up the back of the cooking table. He was so brazen that at point blank range, he did not even flinch when I hurled a stone in his direction. (I purposely missed, it would have been too easy to hit him he was so close!) lol

    Related to:
    • Camping

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    Bear Patrol

    by epicult Updated Oct 15, 2003

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    Xana - Bear Hunter (RIP 2005)

    The truth of it is, we are in the bear's territory and must be respectful of these amazing creatures. In general they're afraid of humans but the occasional 'campsite' bear is intelligent enough to know that humans = food.

    You need not worry about black bears (campsite or otherwise) as long as you properly store everything that the bear could possibly construe as food. Bears have a VERY good sense of smell and will not hesitate to smash your canoe in half or destroy your tent to get at anything you've left there! That would be most unfortunate if you happened to be in the tent, at the time.

    There have been a few deaths in the park resulting from bear attacks. Some provoked by poor food storage and some for no reason at all. The chances of this happening to you (if you follow my tip) are about the same as being struck by lightning twice in one day. But it has happened?

    To remedy this possible disaster:

    » Using a large piece of rope (30 or 40 feet), throw it over a branch that is at least 4 metres off the ground and few metres from any tree trunk (we're talking about a large sturdy branch here)

    » Place all food, cooking utensils and garbage into your pack (including toothpaste, etc.). Waterproof packs work best for variable weather

    » Tie the pack to one end of rope and hoist the pack up the tree using the other end and then tie the remaining rope securely to a sturdy tree trunk and sleep tight.

    The presence of a dog also aids in keeping the bear problem at bay :-)

    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Water Problems

    by epicult Updated Aug 8, 2003

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    Note the Gatorade tainted water

    While there are heaps of percievably fresh water lakes in the park, but one must remember that those same lakes double as toilets for the local beavers. That means giardia or 'beaver fever'. You don't want to get this! So here is my water purification tip. There are two ways to purify your water:

    1. Boil it for 5 minutes or so. (very effective but uses precious fuel)
    2. Use water treatment/chemicals... too many types to list here but, a good one is Pristine (very effective, light weight, no bulk and cheap!)
    3. Filters (can't remove some smaller bacteria, are more bulky & are most expensive)

    Regardless of which method you choose, the water is going to taste like sh*t!. To combat the less than desireable taste, bring two (full) 1.5 litre bottles of water. Once these are done (once you start portageing, you'll easily go through two a day), refill with your purified water and, using a small funnel, pour in small amounts of Gatorade crystals to:

    1. help give the water better taste
    2. utilize its water absorbtion qualities

    Kool-aid works too.

    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • epicult's Profile Photo

    Don't burn your booties

    by epicult Updated Jul 30, 2003

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    A boot's best friend - Silicone

    After portaging through brutal trails (if you so choose) there's a good chance your hiking boots will be soaked through and covered in mud. If they're covered in muck, wash them off in a lake/river and place them close to the fire. Not too close though... besides the obvious (melting your boots) the heat of the fire will not only dry your boots, but weaken the glue used to bind your boots together.

    "Good footwear should last you more than a few trips, they should last you a lifetime."

    To avoid the meltdown altogether, apply a nice thick coat of silicone sealant to your snazzy new boots. Tough when you've just blown a decent sum of $$$ on them, but when combined with some cheap gaitors, they won't leak and there will be little need to dry them off at the end of the day.

    Mountain Equipment Co-op is a great place to pickup gear and accessories related to outdoor adventure.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Camping
    • Backpacking

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    Bug Combat!

    by epicult Updated Jul 24, 2003

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    Bug combat zone

    Anyone who has experienced Algonquin is aware of the horrid bug problems during the months of June and July. These include mosquitos, black flies, deer flies and maybe even horse flies. These pests can sometimes be a problem during other months of the years as well. Here are a few ways to help keep these little critters at bay:

    1. Don't visit the park during these months
    2. Wear mosquito net clothing
    3. Lather up with 95% deet (not so great for you)
    4. Don't wear dark clothing (attracts mosquitos)
    5. An old trick borrowed from the Voyagers of the past. Gather up "green" tree branches (from a recently blown down tree - please don't cut "live" branches from trees) and attach them anyway possible to your headgear (using gaff tape, a scarf, etc...). Be sure that they protude in front of your face and ears. You will look and feel ridiculous, like you're ready for "combat", but then again you are at war... with the bugs!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Backpacking
    • Camping

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    Watch out for the moose

    by sim1 Updated Jul 2, 2003

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    Moose crossing area, hazard zone, next 60 km


    Although it is great to spot the moose on the side of highway 60, it needs caution as well when you are driving through the park. Many accidents happen on this road because of the moose. Especially in the springtime they are drawn to the road and you have to be extra carefull. At night they are hard to spot, so the maximum speed of 80 km/hour is no luxery. Moose are huge animals, certainly not something you want to park your car against.... not only for the moose, but also for yourself.
    Every year over two dozen moose are killed and as many vehicles seriously damaged in collisions.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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    Hiking isn't always so easy, LOL :-)

    by sim1 Updated Jul 2, 2003

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    Oops.... muddy again!


    The hiking trails are maintained very well in Algonquin Park, so that's fantastic. But some spots might be muddy to hike, like in the Mizzie Lake Trail and also on the Booth's Rock Trail. These hikes go along beaver ponds and lakes, and after some rain or due to the work of the beavers, the trail might be very wet and muddy in sections. Hahaha, and as you can see, I always seem to get home all muddy and dirty after a hike like that, LOL. So don't put on your best clothes, because you might not keep it as clean as you would like :-)

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Photography

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    No radio in Algonquin Park

    by sim1 Updated Jul 2, 2003

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    No radio signal in Algonquin Park


    Hahaha, not sure if this is a warning or not, or sometimes just a relief. But when you are in Algonquin Park you don't have any radio signal anymore. When you are in luck you can pick up a vague signal of some channel, but the quality isn't very good. So if you want to listen to some music you better brings some cd's with you to play.
    I don't mind it at all actually, I don't spend much time in the car, and outside you can hear the birds singing and lots of other wildlife, hahaha, that's more than enough for me :-)

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

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  • NC_Ziggy's Profile Photo

    Beautiful to See, But Don't Touch!

    by NC_Ziggy Written Oct 6, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I Know this Plant & So Should You!

    This is Sumac! Even worse that Poison Ivy or Poison Oak! More info to come! Until then, don't mess with this!

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    all portages are not created equal....

    by richiecdisc Written Nov 9, 2003

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    up, up and away...

    I know there can be hills on hikes and I guess I knew that portages are more or less hikes, but no one told me there would be hills on the portages!? *&%#

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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Algonquin Provincial Park Warnings and Dangers

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