Barrie Things to Do

  • Marina off of Kempenfelt Bay
    Marina off of Kempenfelt Bay
    by mikey_e
  • The river boat
    The river boat
    by mikey_e
  • View near the Dream Catcher
    View near the Dream Catcher
    by mikey_e

Most Recent Things to Do in Barrie

  • Faiza-Ifrah's Profile Photo

    Entertainment at Casino Rama

    by Faiza-Ifrah Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Leaving the children back at Days Inn, we, husband and wife, went in for a long tour of the Casino. We explored every nook and corner of the Casino and played a few slots. We were inside the Cacino buildings for 4 hours, 1 of which was spent listening to a great jazz band in the Convention centre lobby (see picture # 5). Needless to mention, we fell in love with the Casino.

    Selected excerpts from Casino Rama's website:

    1. Voted Favourite Casino by Toronto Sun readers every year since opening
    2. Opened July 31st, 1996 Open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year
    3. Ontario's only First Nation's commercial casino
    4. 2,258 Free parking spaces
    5. 192,000 square feet of fun and excitement
    6. 2,300 slot machines
    7. 120 Table games
    8. There are 9 unique restaurants - St. Germain's Steakhouse, Rinaldo's (Italian), Couchiching Court Buffet, Willow (authentic Cantonese), Legends, Dream Catcher Sports Bar, The Noodle Bar, The Weirs and Firestarter Lounge
    9. Faith Hill, Jay Leno, Diana Ross, Chicago, Olivia Newton-John, Vince Gill, Tony Bennett, Bill Cosby, Styx, Michael Bolton, Ringo Starr and many more have all performed at Casino Rama
    10. Big name acts appear every week, up close and personal at Casino Rama's 5,000 - seat Entertainment Centre
    11. Casino Rama is the largest single site employer of Aboriginal people in Canada with over 700 Aboriginal employees.
    12. Full service Hotel - 300-luxury hotel rooms
    13. Balance In Life Spa - a full service spa and health club
    14. Meeting & Convention facilities - from a small intimate group to a theatre setting for 720

    Casino, Convention Centre and the hotel Suhail and I in the parking lot Hall at the entrance of the Convention Centre 1st nation's art on the exterior walls of the Casi Jazz band in the lobby of the Convention Centre
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Casino and Gambling

    Was this review helpful?

  • MissAntarctica2002's Profile Photo

    Go to the Farmer's Market

    by MissAntarctica2002 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Barrie Farmer's Market is held every Saturday morning at City Hall. Unlike many Farmer's Markets it is open year round.

    In the spring, summer and fall there are all kinds of fruit and vegetable vendors, plus baking, preserves, some meats and a few craft stalls. In winter there is fewer fresh produce available, but there tends to be more handicrafts, baking, preserves and things.

    The market opens at 8 am and finishes at 12:30pm.

    There is a farmer there that sells all-natural pork products that I go out of my way to get. They serve back bacon on a bun (a Canadian specialty!) that is delicious, or you can buy some frozen meat to prepare on your own.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Faiza-Ifrah's Profile Photo

    Play tennis at the covered dome

    by Faiza-Ifrah Updated Nov 17, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The covered dome is located near the harbor close to Harbor Inn Resort and is the property of the resort (Lagoon City). We found that in October people shift to playing tennis inside the covered domes and it would be difficult to play tennis here without prior booking. So prior booking is what we did. We played on two different days for a total of 4 hours.

    A good pastime was playing against seniors. They applauded each of our serve (perhaps making 25 Kms / hr at best) and shot.

    Ifrah prepares to receive the ball (in the air) Rayyan prepares for a serve This is how the dome looks
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Spirit Catcher

    by mikey_e Updated Sep 20, 2007

    Those familiar with Native Canadian handicrafts will definitely know what a dream catcher is. Its a small circle with a sort of net inside that is supposed to capture people's dreams. The spirit catcher in Barrie is obviously inspired by the arts of the Native Canadians, but it is actually a work of art by a local artist. This is a massive structure that stands out along the shore of Kempenfelt Bay. The plaque says that you can make a wish and the Wish Catcher will catch it.

    The Wish Catcher Wish Catcher from up close Even more up close
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    St. Andrews Presbyterian Church

    by mikey_e Written Sep 20, 2007

    I don't know much about St. Andrews, although it seemed considerably more modern than the Collier United Church. It is conveniently located just off of Collier Street and doesn't really present any remarkable features compared to other churches in small Ontario towns.

    St. Andrews Church
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Dunlop Street

    by mikey_e Written Sep 20, 2007

    Dunlop Street is sort of the main shopping and entertainment drag in Barrie (downtown Barrie that is) and, unlike Collier Street, it isn't under construction. There aren't many upscale, name brand boutiques here, but there is a considerable number of speciality stores. Lots of alcohol-related establishments and knick-knack shops. It interesting to walk along for a bit, but unless you're into paraphenelia its unlikely to retain your interest for long.

    Collier Street
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Rinaldo Spa

    by mikey_e Written Sep 20, 2007

    Collier Street, when I visited Barrie, was largely under construction (repaving) so I can tell exactly what it is like when normal life return. Nevertheless, I was quite interested by the rather unique (in Barrie) architecture of the building housing the Rinaldo Spa. It was a beautiful white wood structure with a pretty stone courtyard out back. As for their services, I have no idea...

    Rinaldo Spa The back of the spa The courtyard
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Spa and Resort
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Municipal Library

    by mikey_e Written Sep 20, 2007

    I don't really know why I photographed this... I think its because the library is in the style that you so often find in York Region, a sort of bureaucratic architectural style in which all new monoliths are constructed. I like to think of it as "ugly monstruism". You be the judge....

    The Municipal Library Ugly Monstruism
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Town Hall

    by mikey_e Written Sep 20, 2007

    There isn't anything all that spectacular about Barrie town hall. Its a modern building with little charm, but it is somewhere that you might visit in the summer, for the farmers' market, or in the winter for the skating rink in the pond in the centre of the courtyard.

    Barrie Town Hall Awnings under which farmers' markets are held
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Collier United Church

    by mikey_e Written Sep 20, 2007

    The sign by this church was quite new, but it was very obvious to me, just from looking down the street, that this was quite an old structure, probably dating from the first expansion of the town. I wasn't let down. Although much of the church has been restored, its look is quite typical of southern Ontario town churches and originally dates from 1864, when it was a Wesleyan (Methodist) church.

    Collier United Church Original plaque Steeple
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    MacLaren Art Centre

    by mikey_e Written Sep 20, 2007

    The MacLaren Art Centre is housed in a beautiful modern building in what is otherwise an uninteresting and sometimes ugly part of Barrie. If you are coming along Collier street you're sure to notice the fake Rodin piece at the corner. There is a large shop attached to the gallery, which specializes in both European art and local art (from Georgian college and other local institutes). I wasn't able to go inside, as I visited Barrie on Sunday before Sunday openings. Nevertheless, the Gallery appears to have a focus on modern art and photography, and a specific interest in East European artists.

    Fake Rodin at the MacLaren Art Gallery MacLaren Entrance Historic part of the MacLaren Gallery Original entrance to the building
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Memorial Square

    by mikey_e Written Sep 20, 2007

    I mentioned in my introduction to Barrie that towns and cities like this were profoundly changed by the World Wars. It should be unsurprising, then that there is a fairly large and promonent monument to those who fought and died for King and Country over there. The masonry and design are quite impressive, especially the white granite (?). The park itself is not all that impressive, and it seems to be a hang out for lots of local folk who simply sit around and chat. There is also a small artillery piece nearby, although far enough from the memorial to be considered a separate exhibit.

    Monument to the Fallen Memorial Square Memorial to the Fallen Artillery Piece
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Heritage Park

    by mikey_e Written Sep 20, 2007

    Heritage Park is an obvious example of great urban redevelopment. It is quite obvious that this area is still under construction at the edges, but this hardly affects your enjoyment of the park and its large numbers of sculpted gardens and benches. There are a few vendors for snacks here, but for the most part it is meant to be a place where you find your own entertainment, preferably with the friends or family you've come to. Don't mind the large numbers of ducks and geese here, they tend not to bother you if you don't bother them.

    Duck Pond Fountain, ironically, by the waterfront Sculpture along the waterfront Arbor Japanese inspired garden
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Kempenfelt Bay

    by mikey_e Written Sep 20, 2007

    Kempenfelt Bay is a finger of water that comes off of Lake Simcoe, the largest lake directly north of the city of Toronto. I decided to put it as a separate tip from Heritage Park because the two are so beautiful in the late summer temperatures. The Bay is a large body of water in which there are plenty of fish and on whose calm waters the sun and clouds are mirrored almost perfectly. This is one of the largest cities in or near cottage country, so it shouldn't surprise the visitor that there are lots of private motorboats and fishermen (and fisherwomen) who come here to enjoy mild summer weekends. If you've come here without a boat, its possible to take a cruise on the large river boat (pictured below) that leaves from the southernmost edge of Heritage Park.

    As a small point of interest, Richard Kempenfelt was an 18th century British rear-admiral who saw many battles in the West and East Indies.

    Marina off of Kempenfelt Bay The river boat View near the Dream Catcher Pebble outlet for the ponds at Heritage Park Towards the city from near the marina
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Fishing
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • CdnJane's Profile Photo

    Watch the fireworks over the bay

    by CdnJane Written Jul 11, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Victoria Day (24th of May holiday weekend) and Canada Day (July 1st) are the two main times for official fireworks. This year the city of Barrie had displays, and it was exciting to watch them burst over the bay. For the 24th of May weekend we were in my parents condominium apartment watching them, but for July 1st we were out on the bay on the Serendipity (See my tip for Boat Trips).

    There are often neighbourhood fireworks, but the ones done at Centennial Beach in Barrie are really spectacular, and professionally done.

    If you aren't seeing the fireworks, but own a pet, please make sure that he/she is inside, or in a safe place because its pretty nerve-wracking for animals those loud bangs. A pet that bolts from you could easily run off and get hit by a car, or take off and get lost. Too many animals are traumatized by fireworks.

    July 1st fireworks from the Serendipity July 1st fireworks from the Serendipity July 1st fireworks from the Serendipity 24th of May Fireworks from Apartment 24th of May Fireworks from Apartment
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Barrie

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

39 travelers online now

Comments

Barrie Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Barrie things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Barrie sightseeing.

View all Barrie hotels