Bruce Peninsula National Park Warnings and Dangers

  • Rattlesnake
    Rattlesnake
    by Faiza-Ifrah
  • These divers were at risk
    These divers were at risk
    by Faiza-Ifrah
  • This is Black Bear territory
    This is Black Bear territory
    by Faiza-Ifrah

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Bruce Peninsula National Park

  • Faiza-Ifrah's Profile Photo

    Red Alert! Massasauga Rattlesnake calls it home

    by Faiza-Ifrah Updated Jul 25, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rattlesnake

    Note: The picture was taken at Visitor Centre's Exhibit.

    Bruce Peninsula National Park is amongst the last few abodes of Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake. This is the only venomous snake of southern and eastern Ontario. Parks Canada advises the following precautionary measures:

    1. Wear long pants and boots
    2. Always look where you are putting your feet and hands
    3. Do not attempt to capture or confine this or any other species
    4. Keep your pet on leash at all the times. Dogs are inquisitive and rattlesnakes don’t like this particular trait.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Faiza-Ifrah's Profile Photo

    No cliff jumping please

    by Faiza-Ifrah Updated Jul 24, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cliff jumping at Halfway Rock Point
    1 more image

    Cliff jumping is strictly prohibited, but daredevils got to do what daredevils got to do (picture 1). There are signs advising against Cliff Jumping and telling that two people recently lost their lives jumping on shallow waters. Besides, there have been numerous injuries reported. What I was afraid of was someone jumping from the cliff over divers below (picture 2), because the jumpers could not see at the base of the cliff. Good news was that visitors were aware of the risk and alerted the jumpers if the divers were in the vicinity.

    Related to:
    • Water Sports
    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Faiza-Ifrah's Profile Photo

    Beware! This is Bear Country

    by Faiza-Ifrah Written Jul 24, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is Black Bear territory

    Park Canada Advisory:

    Please note that the picture was taken at Visitor Centre's Exhibit.

    “Black bears are spectacular and beautiful creatures, and where they have had little contact with humans they tend to avoid us. Bears are strongly attracted to human food and garbage, and can lose their natural inclination to avoid us if they become accustomed to eating our garbage and carelessly stored food. These "denaturalized" bears can become a serious problem.”

    “To help avoid a negative encounter when camping, store your food in your vehicle. If you are at a remote site, cache your food away from your site, or use a bear-proof container. Remember coolers and tents are not bear-proof. Pack out your garbage in sealed plastic bags. Never eat or keep food in your tent. Other bear attractants are: Pet food / dishes, BBQ grease, oil / fat, fish and fish offal, perfumed items (soap, deorderant, toothpate, sun tan lotion, insect spray, hair spray, etc.), wastewater from cooking or doing dishes, tableclothes, etc.”

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Bruce Peninsula National Park

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

77 travelers online now

Comments

Bruce Peninsula National Park Warnings and Dangers

Reviews and photos of Bruce Peninsula National Park warnings and dangers posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Bruce Peninsula National Park sightseeing.

View all Bruce Peninsula National Park hotels