Burlington Off The Beaten Path

  • Ifrah and Rayyan by a well
    Ifrah and Rayyan by a well
    by Faiza-Ifrah
  • Family at the entrance to the Farm
    Family at the entrance to the Farm
    by Faiza-Ifrah
  • During a hike on Bruce Trail
    During a hike on Bruce Trail
    by Faiza-Ifrah

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Burlington

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    Bashing at Kelso Conservation Park

    by Faiza-Ifrah Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    View from halfway mark to the top of the hill
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    Kelso, a 397 hectare park established in 1960 on the Niagara Escarpment in Milton, offers diversified activities. The park is reached by taking Highway 401 and then taking Highway 25 north to Campbellville Road; going west to Tremaine Road and finally going south until you reach Kelso Road. Turn right to park entrance.

    Here is a list of activities that we indulged in as a group of 22 people:

    1. Started by canoing and peddle boating in the lake waters.
    2. Had failed attempt on fishing the trout.
    3. Played cricket to the amusement of many other visitors (now what game is that they seem to ask).
    4. Played rugby.
    5. Had another session of canoing.
    6. Had a swimming session.
    7. Photgraphed birds.
    8. Hiked and mountain biked on 16 km of trails including connections to the Bruce Trail.
    9. Played beach volleyball
    10. Visited campsites (total 16 in numbers), but decided against camping.
    11. Had a final session of canoing.

    Winter activities include skiing and cross country skiing. We are not winter people. Therefore, we have not tried these activities yet.

    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Motorcycle
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Hiking start point - Scottsdale Farm

    by Faiza-Ifrah Written Mar 8, 2008

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    Ifrah and Rayyan by a well
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    Scottsdale farm was donated to the Ontario Heritage Foundation in 1982 by Stewart and Violet Bennett. The Farm is the starting point for The Bennett Heritage Trail that officially opened on Canada Day in 1992.

    The Farm is a 1300-hectare property bordering the Niagara Escarpment and sharing with it the special ecological qualities of the Escarpment. The native people tilled the farm for over 2 centuries long before the arrival of the Akaadians.

    We found that the farm is still a working farm and is managed by the Credit Valley Conservation Authority. There is a barn, farm animals, ponds with lots of domesticated and migratory birds in it, a well, and many trails within the Farm that connect with one of the the Bruce Trails.

    In order to reach the Bruce Trail, please follow these directions from the website: "from the parking lot at Scottsdale Farm walk southwest towards Trafalgar Road along a farm lane bordered by Norway spruce. Near the top of the rise turn left onto a wide lane leading into a mature woodlot of maple, beech and white pines. The trail is marked with blue blazes indicating this is a Bruce Trail side trail. Just before reaching Trafalgar Road, the trail turns left over a cedar rail fence. On your right you will see a trail map. Just beyond this you will come to a Y intersection. Keep left and follow the white blazes on the mail Bruce Trail into the woods."

    In order to reach the farm we took Hwy 401 exit 328. We traveled north on Regional Road 3 (Trafalgar Rd) for about 18.5 km and turned east (right) off Regional Rd 3 to the lane into the farm.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Visiting Ontario's past at Crawford Lake

    by Faiza-Ifrah Written Jan 27, 2008

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    At the map of the conservation area
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    Crawford Lake Conservation Area is a 468 hectare park established in 1969 on the Niagara Escarpment in Milton. The conservation area comprises a rare meromictic lake with surrounding boardwalk and a 15th century reconstructed Iroquoian Village and heritage site, which is one of the most accurately dated pre-contact archeological sites in Canada.

    We visited the area in early spring (2005) and then Rayyan visited it again in winter of 2005 as part of his class field trip.

    The Lake is located in the vicinity of other conservation areas like Kelso, Hilton Falls, Mountburg Wildlife Centre and others. However, it is different from other conservation areas in that a trip here is for looking at the distant past of Ontario. The Iroquoian Village is a big educational attraction. This is topped by 19 km of hiking and cross-country skiing and snowshoeing trails with connections to Bruce Trail.

    Direction: 5 kms south of Highway 401 on Guelph Line at its junction with Steeles avenue just after Campbellville. The Lake can also be reached from QEQ/Highway 403 as it is located 15 kms north of QEW on Guelph Line after Lowville Park.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Archeology

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    Watching local fauna at Mountsberg Wildlife Centre

    by Faiza-Ifrah Updated Aug 1, 2007

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    Raptor under training
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    As it is close to our home, visiting Mountsberg Wildlife Centre is no problem for us. Also, it is located in the neighbourhood of few other Halton Region's attractions like Hilton Falls, Kelso Conservation Area, Crawford Lake Conservation Area, etc. You can combine this outing with either a canoeing trip to Kelso or to a hiking trip to Hilton Falls.

    Major activities and facilities include:

    1. 16 km of hiking in summer and fall and cross-country ski trails in winter
    2. Birding, fishing and wildlife viewing (see picture of a hide)
    3. Raptor Centre with exhibits & live bird of prey presentations (see the pictures)
    4. Horse drawn wagon and sleigh rides
    5. Skating on the pond
    6. Visitor Centre
    7. 5 Acre Maze in the fall
    8. Children's play barn

    There are nominal entrance fees.

    Directions:

    From Highway 401 go south on Guelph Line. Turn west on Campbellville Road for 4 km and then go north on Milburough Line for 1 km to park entrance.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Theme Park Trips

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    Hiking and riverwalking in Lowville Park

    by Faiza-Ifrah Updated Jun 22, 2007

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    Early fall - fallen leaves and changing colours
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    Lowville park is located on left hand side of Guelph Line after a picturesque journey down from Highway 401.

    The park has no entrance fee and is a great place to have picnic, bbq, games and a hike through the forest along the meandering river. We have visitied the park in sumer and fall seasons. The park seems to be farely popular with the families visiting from from far off places. The river is shallow and can be easily crossed in summer from many places. However, we took the wooden bridge more often than not (see picture).

    There are many tracks for hiking within the lowville park. We found that hiking in Fall season is most rewarding. If we ever have a dog in the future, this would be the most sought place for us to take him with us. Else, if you are a dog lover then you ought to be here to admire man's / woman's best friend by his / her side.

    One warning is in order here. The weather can get nippy during the afternoon. So be appropriately dressed.

    Also, the ground is wet and mucky. If children skid, they are surely going to ensure that you spend good amount of powder and effort in the next laundry.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Hiking to an enchanting Hilton Falls

    by Faiza-Ifrah Written Jun 19, 2007

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    4 of 12 at the Hilton Falls
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    We were 4 families (12 members in all) who visited this 645 hectare Hilton Falls Conservation Park in Niagara Escarpment in the last week of May 2007 to see the Hilton Falls.

    Entering the park, we headed straight to the nearby grassy picnic area to prepare and enjoy bbq, a Pakistani Tandoori style, which is a family favorite.

    The track to the Hilton Falls starts from farther side of the grassy area. See the picture with people heading to and coming back. Crossing the bridge, you will see an observatory / visitor area and wash rooms on your left hand side with map of the park on the right hand side. The colourful visitor centre depicts the wildlife found in the park along with other information.

    The track is about 5 kms through wilderness and itself is a big fun.

    Once there you can have a beautiful view of the fall about 10 meters below from the viewing station. There are signs of a historic saw mill that is closed now.

    In order to get the idea, please see the pictures.

    This park is open year round with cross country skiing in winters.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Skiing and Boarding
    • Fishing

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Burlington Off The Beaten Path

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