Midland Local Customs

  • "The H.M. Schooner Bee" Mural
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  • "The Playfair Mill" Mural
    by sim1
  • "The General Store" Mural
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Best Rated Local Customs in Midland

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    "Benjamin Moore Paints" Mural

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    The next mural, the Benjamin Moore Paints advertisement, was appropriately located on the front of what was Tripp's Paint and Decorating Shoppe. It is a reproduction of the very first in-store advertisement for Benjamin Moore Paints. This mural blends the actual windows on the building so that they appear as part of the mural. The only 'fake' window is the middle one. This advertisement first appeared in 1919 and featured the tag line 'Quality forever-Moore.'


    313 King St.
    Fred Lenz
    1995

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    Mural about Midland's bustling harbour

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    Mural about Midland's bustling harbour


    The third mural depicts Midland's bustling harbour with an example of one of the many passenger and packet steamers the plied the waters of Georgian Bay at the turn of the century. Appropriately, the foreground 'Fishing in Midland Harbour', shows a young man fishing off the dock while a dog watches. This is appropriate since this mural was located on the front of the Midland Fish & Chips Restaurant. Hahaha, I like this combination of Mural and the sign of the shop right below it :-))

    311 King St.
    Fred Lenz
    1995

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    'The Water Fountain' Mural

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    'The Water Fountain' Mural


    On the corner of King Street is where you will find 'The Water Fountain'. This mural is called 'The Water Fountain' and shows a window into the past; a window that is in the shape of a maple leaf. Through this window it is the mid 1920s and we are looking at this exact corner. Located in front of where the mural is painted used to be a fountain where you or your horse could get a drink. Seen across the street was a well known landmark, The Georgian Hotel.


    274 King St.
    Fred Lenz
    1997

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    "The H.M. Schooner Bee" Mural

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    This one of the H.M. Schooner Bee was the second painted by Dan Sawatzky. This twenty foot high mural depicts the era of sailing ships. The Schooner Bee is a working replica which currently sails the waters of Georgian Bay from its berth at King's Wharf at Penetanguishene's Discovery Harbour historic site. The original Schooner Bee was built in 1817 and sailed until 1831.

    277 King St.
    Dan Sawatzky
    1991

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    "The Playfair Mill" Mural

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    Only a few steps away, on the same wall is the next mural. This next one is a zoomed in picture of a mural that was done by Dan Sawatzky in 1990 and depicts the Playfair Mill in 1890. It was the first lumber mill in the area and was built in the Fall of 1871. It operated successfully with lumber that was brought to Midland by ship. It was milled and then sent out again by water until 1882. That was when the mill was sold and subsequently went into receivership in 1886. It was then bought by James Playfair and D. L. Hoyt who turned it into a profit making venture until it was destroyed by a devastating fire in the Fall of 1916.

    277 King St.
    Dan Sawatzky
    1990

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    "The Midland Railway" Mural

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    On the corner of Dominion Avenue you can see this next bug mural. This mural depicts the Midland Railway as it was. In November of 1871, Adolphe Hugel and George Cox of the Midland Railway Corporation of Peterborough and Port Hope selected this site for the western terminus of their railway. It was July 1st 1879 when the construction was completed and the station was officially opened for commercial and passenger service.


    239 King St.
    Fred Lenz
    1995

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    The lighthouse Mural!

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    The Lighthouse mural!


    Hahaha, this one is by far my favourite! The lighthouse mural! It's on the corner of the lighthouse store, a store with only and all about lighthouses and everything that has to do with it (see m shopping tips)

    This mural is a rendering of Brebeuf Lighthouse, originally built in 1900. It was built to guide ships on the range from Giants Tomb Light to the channel serving Midland Bay. The mural measures 50 ft. by 28 ft. high and incorporates a window in the apartment above as the light room in the tower. Amazing how big it is. You can see the telephone booth on the foreground to give you an idea about the height. On the intro of this page you can see a larger version of this picture, but than with me posing in front of it....

    Aaah, and as you all probably now, I have something special with lighthouses. So this was one picture that I 'had' to take :-)) Interested in lighthouses yourself? Than take a look at my lighthouse page :

    http://www.virtualtourist.com/m/1c048/2/6/#T
    or
    http://www.geocities.com/sim1themes1/lighthouses.html

    239 King St.
    Fred Lenz
    1995

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    "The General Store" Mural

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    Okay, I got excited about the lighthouse mural because it is a lighthouse... but if I leave that factor out, this is the best mural I saw in Midland.
    There are so many things to see on this mural, it is almost like looking at a real store, but it is all painted on the walls.

    These murals actually take you back in time to show you what the building we are looking at was at that time. On this very site the Western Bank of Canada built Midland's first bank in 1882. In 1895, the building was sold to William Preston and James Playfair who operated a general store and wholesale business as depicted in the murals you see here.


    205/207 King St.
    Fred Lenz
    1994

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    "The General Store" Mural

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    And the last but not least photo of the murals. I really like the way the entrance is painted. There is actually a door there, but you have to look quite good what the painted door is and what the real.

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    The Murals of Midland

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    Murals of Midland


    In Midland you can find murals everywhere in the downtown area. The murals are really fun to watch. In these Cultural tips I want to show you some of these murals. There area over 30 murals portraying the history of Midland. Hahaha, I won't bore you with all of them, so here is a small selection.

    This first mural is located at the corner of King Street and Elizabeth Street and was painted by Fred Lenz in 1991. The mural shows Sainte-Marie Among the Hurons at the time when Jesuit missionaries lived at the site among the Huron Indian people. The time period is in the mid 1600s. For ten years Sainte-Marie flourished. It would be the home of all the French in the area. In 1649, the Huron Nation was scattering fearfully before the encroaching Iroquois. Tribal warfare intensified as the rivalry for the fur trade grew. Five priests met their death before the settlement was abandoned and burned.

    333 King St.
    Fred Lenz
    1991

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    "The Wye Marsh" mural

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    This second mural is actually part of three murals next to each other. All three are painted above some shops.

    This mural is called 'The Wye Marsh'. It shows a view of the Wye Marsh at sunset, while looking towards the Martyrs' Shrine, which can be seen in the background. The foreground shows two groups of Mallard Ducks. One group is preparing to land in the marsh while the other is passing over the marsh. The Wye Marsh is a local wildlife center dedicated to preserving the marshlands and the wildlife that inhabits it. I've been to Wye Marsh myself, and it is really a nice place to visit! You can read all about it under my 'off the beaten path' tips.


    317 King St.
    Fred Lenz
    1995

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    A First Canadian Christmas

    by airkarat Updated Oct 15, 2008
    2000 candles, firelight on animal skins

    Every year, in the beginning of December, I attend First Light at Sainte Marie Among the Hurons just outside Midland, Ontario. Although our modern Canadian Christmas holiday celebrations are not even always celebrated from a religious perspective, it is interesting to learn about the melding of culture, religion and positive intent that formed some of the very first New World Christmases, and produced Canada's first unique Christmas carol.

    From other VT tips you will see that a 17th century French Jesuit mission was established at Sainte Marie, to convert the local Wendat people to Christianity. The area is now enshrined as a sacred site (visited and declared so by Pope John II in 1984) of the massacre of the Fathers and their converts.

    On one side of the road is the Martyr's Shrine which is visited annually by thousands of Catholic pilgrims and where miracles are reported to take place. On the other side of the road is the rebuilt fortress with the buildings that would have constituted a mission as designed in Old France but built with local, hand-hewn materials.

    The fort with re-enactors in period costume, is open during the summer only, but opens for three evenings in early December to coincide with First Light - the beginning of the Christian Advent season. Again the re-enactors are present, working iron in the forge, firing musket rounds, or baking gingerbread from a 17th century recipe for visitors to sample... the most special thing about this evening event is that the buildings and footpaths are lit exclusively by candlelight - over 2000 pillar candles in glass jars. Fires are dotted around the grounds for warming up, free hot apple cider and hot chocolate are served while children are invited to make Christmas crafts in the outer buildings.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Music
    • Historical Travel

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    Native Culture, Music, at Sainte Marie

    by airkarat Updated Oct 15, 2008
    Pinecone with gold paint tips - kid's craft!

    I can't describe how beautiful and magical these nights truly are! My favourite time is spent in the longhouse - the smoky traditional Huron (Wendat) community building where, surrounded by tobacco, herbs, and animal pelts, visitors are mesmerized by drum songs and legends. Sitting low on a warm eathen floor to escape the thick smoke above, elbow to elbow with complete strangers, you will be welcomed by the hosts and find yourself laughing and singing along.

    Then, and not to be missed, visit the chapel to hear the first Canadian Christmas carol - written right here in 1640. "’Twas in the Moon of Wintertime," generally considered the first Canadian carol, was originally written in the Huron Indian language and set to an old French tune by a Jesuit priest, Jean de Brebeuf. In retelling the story of the Nativity, Father Brebeuf used symbols and figures that could be understood by the Hurons, and the hymn entered the tribe's oral tradition. The carol re-emerged in Quebec, where many of the Huron converts ended up after the mission was destroyed, and was translated into English and French.

    Twas in the moon of winter time, when all the birds had fled,
    that mighty Gitchi-Manitou sent angel choirs instead;
    before their light the stars grew dim, and wandering hunters heard the hymn:
    Jesus your King is born, Jesus is born, in excelsis gloria.

    Within a lodge of broken bark the tender babe was found,
    a ragged robe of rabbit skin enwrapped his beauty round;
    but as the hunter braves drew nigh, the angel song rang loud and high:
    Jesus your King is born, Jesus is born, in excelsis gloria.

    O children of the forest free, O sons of Manitou,
    the holy child of earth and heaven is born today for you.
    Come, kneel before the radiant boy, who brings you beauty, peace and joy:
    Jesus your King is born, Jesus is born, in excelsis gloria.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Music
    • Religious Travel

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    Zooming in on "The General Store" Mural

    by sim1 Updated Nov 28, 2002

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    Zooming in on the entrance of the shop. Hahaha, you can actually do some windowshopping here, it is all a bit outdated though ;-)

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Midland Local Customs

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