National War Memorial, Ottawa

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  • National War Memorial, Ottawa
    National War Memorial, Ottawa
    by kris-t
  • National War Memorial, Ottawa
    National War Memorial, Ottawa
    by kris-t
  • National War Memorial, Ottawa
    National War Memorial, Ottawa
    by kris-t
  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

    by kris-t Written Jul 17, 2011

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tomb of the Unknown Soldier
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    The National War Memorial (also known as The Response) stands in Confederation Square.

    The memorial, from grade to the tip of the surmounting statue's wings, is approximately 21.34 m (70ft).

    The Canadian Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was added to the memorial site and symbolizes the sacrifice made by every Canadian who has died for Cnanda.

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  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    Informative Guide

    by apbeaches Written Aug 13, 2009

    We enjoyed the hourly changing on the guard at the War Memorial. Guides were present that shared a lot of information about this monument. We were told that the tomb of the unknown solider contains soil from all provinces in Canada. Symbols of Canada were above the tomb. World War I, II and Korea were identified. 22 soldiers representing branches of the military were cast in bronze. The monument above the arch symbolizes peace and freedom.

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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Remembering the dead

    by pieter_jan_v Written Jun 21, 2007

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    National War Memorial - Ottawa
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    The National War Memorial was constructed to commemorate the 60,000 Canadian soldiers who died in the First World War. After a long period works were completed in 1939.
    In 1982 the bronze numerals "1939-1945" & "1950-1953"were added to honour the deads from WW2 and the Korean War.

    In May 2000 the remains of an unidentified Canadian Soldier who died in World War I, were transported from France and buried in Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the South-side of the memorial.

    At November 11 the Remembrance Day ceremonies are held here annually.

    Occasionally heads of states or other government representatives will lay a wreath.

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  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    National War Memorial

    by victorwkf Written Apr 30, 2006

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    National War Memorial at Ottawa, Canada
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    One of the landmarks of Ottawa must be the National War Memorial which commemorates the Canadian soldiers who lost their lives during World War Two. This monument is located just across Parliament Hill and the Fairmont Chateau Laurier hotel. It is also very impressive at night with the lightings on it (see photograph).

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  • NC_Ziggy's Profile Photo

    Back to the Backside...

    by NC_Ziggy Updated Jan 28, 2006

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    National War Memorial

    Once again, I find myself on the backside. Do you detect a theme here? I seem to mirror these pages often finding myself on the "backside" of life. All I can say is that if the backside of life treats me as well as being on the backside of these views of Ottawa, I'll do just fine!

    This memorial is best viewed from the other side and I wasn't sure at the time what I was photographing, so I just zoomed in on something that looked interesting to me and now I have trouble figuring out what it is! Duh! But as I was running short on time and this seemed to be a very busy intersection to cross, I took this picture and took my leave. I'm sure this is covered in other, better tips to this most important Memorial. Check them out!

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  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Canadian Peacekeeping Memorial

    by Blatherwick Updated Sep 4, 2005
    Canadian Peacekeeping Memorial

    Every country has a memorial to its war heroes. Well, Canada has also memorialized the process of peace. The peacekeeping monument is the only monument of its kind in the world. Peacekeeping is an important aspect of Canada's national heritage and a reflection its fundamental beliefs. 120 Canadians have lost their lives in peacekeeping missions.

    The design of the memorial features three bronze figures, representing members of Canada's Armed Forces, standing on top of this monument. They are perched symbolically on high, converging walls that rise above the debris of war and they are overseeing the process of reconciliation. Markers on the ground commemorate each peacekeeping mission that Canadians have participated in.

    Although the United Nations deployed some observer missions in its early years, the term "peacekeeping" did not enter popular use until 1956. The eruption of conflict in the Middle East prompted Lester B. Pearson, then Canadian Secretary of State for External Affairs and later Prime Minister of Canada, to propose the deployment of an international peace force under the UN flag. Since that time there have been over 50 United Nations peacekeeping missions and the number continues to grow.

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  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    National War Memorial

    by Blatherwick Written Sep 4, 2005
    National War Memorial

    Dedicated in 1939 in commemmoration of the First World War, the National War Memorial consists of a tall stone arch adorned with metal sculptures. The main work, titled "The Response", depicts a diverse group of soldiers and servicepeople marching forward below the arch; one is mounted, and several tote a gun carriage. The top of the arch features figures representing peace and freedom.

    Though made to comemmorate WWI, the memorial also officially remembers the Second World War and Korean War. It also features the Canadian Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, placed in 2000 in front of the memorial.

    On November 11 this memorial becomes the focus of the country as people commemorate those who served Canada in times of war and in various peacekeeping missions.

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  • deadites's Profile Photo

    National War Memorial

    by deadites Updated Dec 12, 2004

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    National War Memorial

    Originally built as a dedication to those who served in the Great War, the memorial was rededicated in 1982 to include those who served in World War 2 and the Korean War.

    The angels on top represent Peace and Freedom, while the soldiers under the arch represent the "Great Response" of the hundreds of thousands of soldiers who answered the call to serve in WW1.

    From King George's unveiling speech:

    "The memorial speaks to her world of Canada's heart. Its symbolism has been beautifully adapted to this great end. It has been well named 'The Response.' One sees at a glance the answer made by Canada when the world's peace was broken and freedom threatened in the fateful years of the Great War. It depicts the zeal with which this country entered the conflict."

    Each year the annual Remembrance Day ceremony on November 11th is televised from Ottawa across the nation, commemorating those who gave the supreme sacrifice

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  • birvine's Profile Photo

    We Remember

    by birvine Written Nov 12, 2004

    Within view of the Chateau and the Parliament lies the cenotaph honouring our war veterans. Whether you've seen it live or on tv for Remembrance Day services, hear about the Unknown Soldier, or are interested in Ottawa's architecture, the memorial is a must-see.

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  • jamiesno's Profile Photo

    National War Memorial

    by jamiesno Written Oct 27, 2004

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    National War Memorial

    Located in the centre of Confederation Square at the intersection of Wellington, Sparks, and Elgin Streets (across from the Chateau Laurier) stands the National War Memorial. The monument is a symbol of the passing of war into peace.

    The War Memorial, originally designed to commemorate Canadians who died in World War I, now honours all of Canada's war dead. Its bronze figures emerge from a great arch, symbolizing the sacrifices made in the journey from war to peace. You can also view the recently added Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

    Here is a picture I took of the memorial. There is generally a lot of people around this area and it is important to go here and take it in what it means exactly!

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  • Lisser's Profile Photo

    The National War Memorial

    by Lisser Updated Aug 1, 2003

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    Me and the National War Memorial

    This large memorial arch is a tribute to all Canadians who have served Canada in war. The National War Memorial stands majestically in Confederation Square in the heart of downtown Ottawa.
    The Memorial, 21 metres high, is made of a granite arch featuring bronze figures representing Peace and Freedom. Advancing through the archway are 22 bronze figures, representing the "Great Response" of hundreds of thousands of Canadians who answered the call to serve during the First World War. Over the years, the Memorial has come to symbolize the sacrifice of all Canadians who served Canada in times of war.

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  • MDH's Profile Photo

    The National War Memorial

    by MDH Updated Apr 2, 2003

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    The National War Memorial with the Chateau Laurier

    The National War Memorial/Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is a large memorial arch perched above a ragged collumn of soldiers, calvarymen and sailors marching underneath it, heading perhaps towards their own fates. Dedicated in 1939 by King George VI in commemoration of Canada's traumatic First World War loses, the memorial has since incorporated the years of Canada's other more recent conflicts.

    In May of 2000, the remains of an unknown soldier killed sometime in the First World War near Vimy Ridge were laid to rest below the memorial. His tomb is marked by a simple plaque, sword and WW1-era British helmet.

    This is a moving monument that reflects the nation's 116,000 war dead. Visitors to the city should spend a few minutes at the monument.

    As a note of respect, please don't stand atop or sit down on the Unknown Soldier's tomb.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The Ceremonial Guard

    by kris-t Updated Jul 17, 2011

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    National War Memorial, Ottawa
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    The Ceremonial Guard providing daily sentries at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the National War Memorial.

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