Parliament Hill, Ottawa

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  • Queen Elizabeth II
    Queen Elizabeth II
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    neo-gothic tracery
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    House of Commons
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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Parliament - Peace Tower

    by kris-t Updated Oct 17, 2011

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    Peace Tower
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    Peace Tower is the part of the center block. It is a free standing bell tower of about 91 meters (300 ft.) tall.

    Visitors are able to tour the tower and can access the outlook near the very top which offers great views of the Ottawa area.

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    Parliament Hill

    by kris-t Updated Oct 17, 2011

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    Parliament Hill, Ottawa
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    Ottawa's Parliament Hill is not just a symbol of national pride for Canadians but one of the most significant heritage sites in Canada.

    In 1976 the Parliament Buildings and the public grounds around the buildings were designated as National Historic Sites.

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    Parliament - Library

    by kris-t Updated Oct 17, 2011

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    Library of Parliament
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    The Library of Parliament is the last untouched part of that larger building's original incarnation, after it burned down in 1916.

    The form and decor of Library of Parliament remain essentially authentic.

    The building is formed as a chapter house, separated from the main body of the Centre Block by a corridor.
    'The walls, supported by a ring of 16 flying buttresses, are load bearing, double-wythe masonry, consisting of a hydraulic lime rubble fill core between an interior layer of finished stone and rustic Nepean sandstone on the exterior.'

    The main reading room (see pictures) rises to a vaulted ceiling and the walls and stacks are lined with white pine panelling carved into a variety of textures, flowers, masks, and mythical creatures.

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    Parliament - Guided Tours

    by kris-t Updated Oct 17, 2011

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    Parliament inside
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    Guided tours of the Parliament Buildings are free to visitors.

    All visitors to the Parliament Buildings are required to undergo security screening at the entrance.

    The Parliament Buildings are a national and absolute treasure to visit.

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    Parliament - East Block

    by kris-t Updated Oct 13, 2011

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    Parliament - East Block
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    The East Block has been maintained as a historically accurate reflection of conditions at the time of Canada's confederation and see costumed persons presenting historical characters from centuries past.

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    Parliament buildings

    by kris-t Updated Oct 13, 2011

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    The Parliament buildings are located in North central Ottawa along the shore of the Ottawa River.

    You cannot drive onto the grounds of Parliament Hill unless you have a permit. Parking is available throughout the area, but it might be more convenient to take a taxi, public transit, or walk.

    The Parliament Hill is a center point for visiting many of the sites located within easy walking distance of the Peace Tower.

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    Parliament - Confederation Hall

    by kris-t Updated Oct 13, 2011

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    Confederation Hall
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    Confederation Hall located immediately inside the main entrance.

    The perimeter of Hall is divided by limestone clustered columns into eight bays of two different sizes. Around the central column is an inlaid marble floor with a 16 point windrose.

    Confederation Hall was the last part of the Centre Block's interior to be completed. Upon completion of this work, the gables of the arch tympanums were adorned with the coats of arms of Canada and the provinces, each surrounded by relevant floral symbols.

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  • Parliament Hill Sound and Light Show (Free!)

    by Easter2011 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    One of my favourite memories of Ottawa is watching the impressive "Sound and Light" show that is shown on Parliament Hill, free of charge, in the evenings during the Summer after the sun goes down.

    The show lasts about 50 minutes. It includes music, a narration in both English and French, and animated images that are projected onto the Parliament Peace Tower itself! The animations fill up the entire building! And it's very creative the way the artists use the space. Multi-coloured lights are projected into the sky around the building, and it was quite moving.

    There's an all-ages audience of roughly 300 - 500 people I would guess, depending upon what evening it is. There are bleacher benches set up on the lawn in front of the buildings, to provide seating.

    It's a great activity for the family, with a wonderful atmosphere, right at our nation's capitol!

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    Stray cat sanctuary

    by marielexoteria Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Kitties taking a nap after dinner
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    In the Parliament Hill you will find the Stray cat sanctuary. This idea was born when a group of people built a shelter for the stray cats who live in the Hill. Everyday volunteers come in and feed them, clean their quarters and interact with them. These cats, while homeless, are tame and friendly, taken care of, vaccinated and neutered.

    The kitties have been living there since the 1970's, according to a sign by the entrance of the sanctuary. There's a small donation box, should you want to give them some money to help cover the over 6000 CAN it costs (per year) to have the place up and running.

    This sanctuary was the first place where I saw a raccoon and a black squirrel up close and personal too.

    According to Lonely Planet's guide, this sanctuary might be a symbol of Canada's compassion and willingness to take care of everyone who needs it.

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    The Parliament Buildings Part 2- the Outside Lawns

    by Paul2001 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Queen Victoria
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    The last time I visited Ottawa I did not have the time to take a tour of the interior of the Parliament Buildings but I did take a leisurely walk around the lawns the surround the main building. This also a very advisable experience as the views of the Ottawa River from Parliament Hill are impressive. Also worth mentioning are the 19 stations that you can visit that will provide you some insight into the Confederation of Canada and the develop of its history. These stations are basically statues and small buildings. You can get a small booklet from the tourist tent which will tell you about the persons or events that each station depicts. Basically the stations are located in a clockwise direction around the main Parliament Building. Personally I thought it was a good way to brush up on my Canadian history. As the statues were all constructed during different artistic eras, the styles different radically. I kind of wonder of William Lyon MacKenzie King would like his and it hyper it exaggerates his plump physic. Another aspect of this walk around the Parliament Buildings are the views of the Ottawa River which are superb from this vantage point.

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    Parliament House Commands The Hill

    by Mikebb Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Parliament House

    The Canadian Parliament House is located in Ottawa on Parliament Hill and is the place of government for Canada. A beautiful building surrounded by large lawns with complimentary Government buildings to either side makes this an impressive site.

    Whilst here you can also visit the Supreme Court Of Canada and the Canadian War Museum which are a short walk.

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    The Library Of Parliament

    by Mikebb Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Across The River To The Library Dome - Forefront

    The Library of Parliament is the last remaining part of the original parliament which survived the fire of 1916. It was renovated again during the period 1952-56 after a fire in the dome and a final renovation was completed in 2006 to keep this heritage building for the people.

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    Parliament Buildings - exterior views

    by yooperprof Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    symbol of Canada
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    Canada's Parliament sits in this impressive neo-Gothic structure, crowning the hillside location where all the centrally important government structures are located. The choice of a gothic design (over a neo-classical concept) was not an accident - it served to underline Canada's continuing association with Britain.

    The central "spire" - known as the Peace Tower - rises to a height of 302 feet. Inside are the House of Commons, the Senate, the Hall of Honour, and the Library of Parliament. Guided tours are offered, and how much see can depend on how much activity is taking place on Parliament Hill on the day of your visit.

    The foundation stone for the Canadian Parliament was lain in 1860 by "Bertie", the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), in 1860. In 1915, a terrible fire destroyed the Centre Block, but even though World War I was ragings, plans were immediately put into place to rebuild, and the foundation stone for the revised "Victoria Tower" (now the Peace Tower) was put into place on September 1, 1916 by Arthur, Duke of Connaught - "Bertie's" younger brother.

    The Library of Parliament is another interesting feature. It's "stars" a remarkable 16-sided dome, supported by flying buttresses and constructed with local sandstone.

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    The Centennial Flame - Canada's 100th Anniversary

    by Mikebb Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Centennial Flame
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    Part of our guided tour was to visit Parliament Hill and the benefit of a local guide to explain the buildings and history cannot be understated. He did a magnificent job and was proud of his city.

    The Centennial Flame is surrounded by the shields of the Canadian provinces and territories, and joined by the water of the fountain, the Centennial Flame symbolizes Canada's unity from sea to sea.

    On January 1st 1967 Lester B Pearson launched Canada's 100th anniversary celebration by lighting the Centennial Flame for the first time.

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    "Famous 5" & "Persons Case"

    by Mikebb Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The 5 Women Of The
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    These scupltures on Parliament Hill are to recognise the 5 women "Women are Persons", known as "Persons Case" and is the recognition of women's rights to be members of the Canadian Senate which was instigated by Emily Murphy.

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