Thunder Bay Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by chris_i79
  • The view from the top of the Giant looking
    The view from the top of the Giant...
    by Skibum251
  • Kakabeka Falls
    Kakabeka Falls
    by Skibum251

Most Recent Things to Do in Thunder Bay

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    Kangas Sauna

    by Arial_27 Written May 9, 2014

    This is a Scandinavian-style restaurant and private saunas for rental. There are small saunas, medium and large; as well as hot tubs.The large saunas are conferencing rooms that include a fire places, mini fridge and could probably accommodate up to 10 people or more. I went on my own and just rented a small sauna - which was more than large enough for just one person.

    It cost a total of $16.98, and includes three separate compartments- a small room with a bed, mirror and small table, a shower room and then the sauna itself. I had 90 minutes to myself in there to relax and spend some time with myself. It was a relaxing experience.

    The inside is all wooden which gives it a Scandinavian feel; although it was too bad that many young people had carved their names, initials and those of their boyfriends/girlfriends on the walls. Didn't interfere with my experience though.

    Kangas doesn't look like much from the outside, but the service is great and the facilities are clean and comfortable. I've never tried the restaurant they have downstairs, but it was packed when I went (during a Friday afternoon) and smelled delicious. It is mostly breakfast-style foods.

    Check out their website for more info.

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    Kakabeka Falls

    by yooperprof Updated Sep 5, 2012

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    got a barrel?
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    Kakabeka Falls is the second largest waterfall in Canada - now, I wonder if Niagara counts as the largest? At any rate, the waterfall here has both a considerable flow and a significant drop - close to 300 feet, and that's nearly sheer. Although it's a "managed fall" that is used for hydroelectric production, even in the middle of summer there's a tremendous visceral energy here that is absolutely mesmerizing for waterfall enthusiasts. Of which I am one.

    Kakabeka Falls is about 15 miles to the west of Thunder Bay Ontario. It's really quite a sight. The falls are steep and deep, and the river carries a significant flow, so there is usually quite a spectacle of foam and spray. The amount of water pouring through is actually managed (and limited) by the local electric generating company, so what the visitor sees on a normal day is really only a fraction of what the First Peoples and early voyageurs would have witnessed in previous times. But it's still a testament to the power of Nature.

    Kakabeka Falls produces an impressive amount of foam. Actually, it's the most foam I've ever seen at a waterfall. (Though I haven't been to Niagara, nor any of the other monster falls around the world.)

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    Old Fort William

    by Toughluck Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Brigades arriving
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    Old Fort William is a reconstruction of the oldest settlement on the Canadian shore of Lake Superior. Originally located on Thunder Bay, Fort William was the commerical center of the Northwest Company of Canada and then the Hudson's Bay Company. Later, as the prairies were settled, Port Arthur developed further north on the bay, where the anchorage was better.

    As the trade with the natives changed, the transcontinental railroads purchase the shoreline property and expanded their rail yards for handling grain shipments from the west. Today, the original fort consist of some foundations beneath the railroad tracks. A sign points to where it once stood.

    Old Fort William is a reconstruction located west of town on the Kaministiquia River. It was the river, after all that determined the original location of the fort. The fur trade used the waterways as their 'railroads' and they needed to be close.

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    Lakehead University 40th Anniversary Celebration

    by Skibum251 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Lakehead University is celebrating its 40th Anniversary and invites all alumni, friends and families to join us! Our Celebration Weekend will include many events such as a campfire by Lake Tamblyn, voyageur canoes rides on Lake Tamblyn and GPS cashing (basically like a scavenger hunt). Main events will include an alumni golf day, opening ceremonies & BBQ, pub night, Celebration Dinner with cuisines from around the world and much, much more. Small group reunions are also taking place throughout the weekend. Don't miss the event that will still be making waves on Lake Superior 40 years from now!

    For more information please contact:
    Heather Ives
    40years@lakeheadu.ca
    Tel (807) 346-7784
    Toll Free (800) 832-8076
    www.lakeheadualumni.ca/40years

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    A Harbor or Dinner Cruise

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Pioneer II Tour Boat

    Since we have our own boat when visiting Thunder Bay, I have not actually taken these tours, but I have watched them come and go and they look like a good activity if you are visiting Thunder Bay without a boat and would like to experience it from the water. The Pioneer II operates out of the Marina Park seven days a week from May 17 to September 28. Cruise times, however, may change or be cancelled due to weather and safety conditions. This cruise offers you a panoramic view of the boat along with commentary on the region’s Ojibway culture and settlements, and the commercial history of the harbour. The summer months also brings you the option of a weekly dinner cruise on the Kaministiquia River. Depending on which tour you choose, prices range from $10 to $19. In 2003 the Kam River Dinner cruise cost $45. Children under age 2 were free of charge for all cruises. This boat is weather enclosed, equipped with booth style seating, has washrooms, and often runs a snack bar. You may call them at 807-623-2628 or write 261 McCluskey Drive, R.R. #3 Thunder Bay, Ontario P7C 4V2. Email: crusader@tbaytel.net For directions to the marina and other information visit their website.

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    Ouimet Canyon Provincial Park and Eagle Canyon

    by brian43 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ouimet Canyon looking west

    A 300 ft. lookout from 2 observation platforms over a glacially formed canyon in the wilds of Northwestern Ontario as well as a wood and cable suspension bridge, picnic sites. Eagle Canyon has a suspension rope bridge across it as well as a campground with swimming. Parks close to one another.

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    Old Fort Williams a Living History Experience

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Mar 30, 2010

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    Battle of Fort Williams
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    Old Fort Williams is the best living history museum I have ever visited. We enjoyed it so much that we have been there twice. It is a real adventure with colorful characters that re-enact the life of the original inhabitants. You can explore it on you own schedule, or do as we did on our second visit and arrive before 10:30, which is when the first mini-skit begins, pick up your schedule of short re-enactments and then move from historical skit to skit. You can watch such things as a council meeting, the arrest of the blacksmith, bread preparation, a doctor’s treatment of a patient, a canoe arrival, a fur trading event, and other fun skits. These mini-plays are both very entertaining and educational. A definite must for anyone interested in history and/or the mountain man era. We spent 5 hours there the first time, and even longer the second, and enjoyed every minute. The North West Company of Montreal made its mark on the North American fur trade by establishing what was then called Fort Kaministikwia in 1803. This was later named Fort William in honor of its Chief Director. This was the big competitor to the United State’s Hudson Bay Company. The lunch is designed to be period like, and we had scones and split pea soup for lunch.

    Note: All Images courtesy of Fort William Historical Park

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  • Eagle Rock Canyon Ziplining

    by pinkpanther2911 Written Aug 25, 2009

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    Eagle rock Canyon recently opened up their Zipline. The experience is quite exciting. Unfortunately, the cost is not appealing. It costs $75 to do the zipline, plus an additional $20 just to walk up to the zipline (approx a 5 minute walk). The cost really should just include the entrance fee as the walk up is nothing spectacular. The view from where you wait to ride the zipline is very nice. If the price stayed at its original $50 that included the entrance fee, before they double the cost, it would have made the experience much more enjoyable. It takes roughly 45 seconds to go all the way down the zipline, and if you go on a day that is not windy, you will get to experience the sights around you. Your best bang for your buck, is to go on the suspension bridges there. The bridges make for a more memorable experience in both the thrill of the height or the length of bridge to walk across. Watching people cross the bridge is also quite amusing, many people feel if they walk crouched down and slowly they will be safer. I was a victim of the armadillo walking position! haha.

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    Terry Fox Monument

    by Babzz Written Jun 20, 2007

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    A monument to this amazing and inspiration young man who in life and death has done so much for cancer patients. From the monument: “Terry Fox inspired this nation with his dream – his marathon of hope – a cross-Canada run to raise money for cancer research…After dipping his foot in the Atlantic, he began his epic in St. John’s, Newfoundland on April 12, 1980. Running 26 miles a day, this outstanding young athlete had conquered five provinces by the time he had reached Ontario in June. Then, at mile number 3, 339, near this very site, recurring cancer forced him to give up his run.”

    Definitely worth a 10 minute stop. There is also a visitor centre (closed for lunch when we were there!) and picnic tables with a lovely view out towards Thunder Bay and Lake Superior.

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    Kakabeka Falls Provincial Park

    by Babzz Written Jun 20, 2007

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    The park is located a short drive west of Thunder Bay. The waterfalls (“Niagara of the North”) are beautiful with a convenient boardwalk nearly looping around them so you can get a close view of the falls and the river. Along the boardwalk there are interesting information boards about the history of the area, the formation of the falls, and the importance of the river for the native people and, later, the European arrivals. BUT that is not all there is to do at this lovely park. There are a few nice walking/hiking trails of varying difficulty that provide opportunity for wildlife viewing. To get to the two closest to the falls, you have to walk past the visitor centre across the parking lot. The other trail starts somewhere at the other side of the park, so enquire at the centre or grab the Kakabeka Falls newsletter at the entrance, which contains a detailed map and description of the trails. Entry to the park is free, but there is paid parking with max $7 for the whole day. Camping grounds onsite. Park open year-round.

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  • Horseback riding in Shabaqua

    by lorikeet Written Jul 17, 2006

    Harry Lasn owns Shabaqua Appaloosa's, out in beautiful Shabaqua. He has 14 extremely well-mannered horses and offers trail rides for singles or groups. Beautiful territory out there and places to go swimming &/or fishing too. Bring a tent and stay overnite if you like. He will supply meals for a fee or bring your own. Give him a call!
    Make sure you bring bug spray!!!
    will add photos soon.

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  • Enjoy tubing down the Stanley River

    by lorikeet Updated Jul 17, 2006

    One of my favorite things to do at least once every summer is to go tubing down the Stanley River. The more people that go, the merrier, so invite all your friends! Make sure you go on a REAL hot day with no or little clouds because it can be chilly out there on the water. When you get too hot, just jump into the river! It takes anywhere from 2 1/2 - 3 1/2 hrs to go down the river. Make sure you wear strong waterproof sunscreen too or you will look like a lobster! The tubes are large and have a tarp over them and they all clip together so you all stay together. They are very comfy. Bring a cooler with munchies and drinks (alcohol not allowed) and rent an extra tube just for your cooler. I will attach some pics later.

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    Terry Fox Marker

    by yooperprof Written Sep 19, 2005

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    a legacy etched in stone

    "Terry Fox inspired an entire generation of Canadians with his determination and devotion, and it was through his strength and commitment that he united Canadians as they have never been united before.

    It is for such a reason this monument was designed, joining east with west, depicting all provincial and territorial coats-of-arms and the Canadian emblems of the Maple Leaf and the Beaver.

    As Ontario's tribute to Terry Fox's contribution to his country, this statue and monument is dedicated to his memory on behalf of all Ontario citizens."

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    Terry Fox Memorial

    by yooperprof Updated Sep 19, 2005

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    Clue to a

    Terry Fox is the greatest hero of Canada. That in itself is fascinating to me. I am interested in Canadian Culture and History and I teach a class on it, so the "Terry Fox phenomenon" is something I'm trying to figure out and relate to other aspects of "the Canadian weltanschauung".

    (That's a fancy word for "world-view".)

    Terry Fox was a brave young man who was diagnosed with cancer when he vowed to run all the way across Canada in order to raise money for medical research. He started in Nova Scotia and made it over 2000 miles (running the equivalent of a marathon every day for several months) before he was forced to abandon his quest just outside the city of Thunder Bay. The Terry Fox Memorial is located close to the spot where he was forced to quit.

    Terry Fox had just one of the legs he was born with. His other leg had been amputated, and he ran with an artificial leg that he took off at the end of every day, screwed back in the next.

    Fox died shortly afterwards, but his run helped to raise millions of dollars for cancer research, and he has not been forgotten since.

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    Fort William Provincial Park

    by yooperprof Written Sep 6, 2005

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    historical tourism

    One of the major attractions in Thunder Bay is Fort William Provincial Park, an authentic "period" reconstruction of the largest frontier fur trading post in north american. You should plan on spending at least 4-5 hours here: the experience of visiting the park is enhanced by energetic and entertaining "role-players" who "live out" the life of the encampment in the early 19th century.

    The Visitor's Center offers short introductory films, a gift store, and a conference center. And this is where you pay for admission as well. It was $12 canadian for an adult - I thought well worth it.

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