Thunder Bay Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by chris_i79
  • The view from the top of the Giant looking
    The view from the top of the Giant...
    by Skibum251
  • Kakabeka Falls
    Kakabeka Falls
    by Skibum251

Best Rated Things to Do in Thunder Bay

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    A Harbor or Dinner Cruise

    by KimberlyAnn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Pioneer II Tour Boat

    Since we have our own boat when visiting Thunder Bay, I have not actually taken these tours, but I have watched them come and go and they look like a good activity if you are visiting Thunder Bay without a boat and would like to experience it from the water. The Pioneer II operates out of the Marina Park seven days a week from May 17 to September 28. Cruise times, however, may change or be cancelled due to weather and safety conditions. This cruise offers you a panoramic view of the boat along with commentary on the region’s Ojibway culture and settlements, and the commercial history of the harbour. The summer months also brings you the option of a weekly dinner cruise on the Kaministiquia River. Depending on which tour you choose, prices range from $10 to $19. In 2003 the Kam River Dinner cruise cost $45. Children under age 2 were free of charge for all cruises. This boat is weather enclosed, equipped with booth style seating, has washrooms, and often runs a snack bar. You may call them at 807-623-2628 or write 261 McCluskey Drive, R.R. #3 Thunder Bay, Ontario P7C 4V2. Email: crusader@tbaytel.net For directions to the marina and other information visit their website.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Cruise

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    Ouimet Canyon Provincial Park and Eagle Canyon

    by brian43 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Ouimet Canyon looking west

    A 300 ft. lookout from 2 observation platforms over a glacially formed canyon in the wilds of Northwestern Ontario as well as a wood and cable suspension bridge, picnic sites. Eagle Canyon has a suspension rope bridge across it as well as a campground with swimming. Parks close to one another.

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    Hike the legend of the Giant

    by D_Shannon Updated Sep 10, 2004

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    Hike the legend of the Sleeping Giant
    The Giant is full of great trails for beginners to more advanced hikers. Go to the Sleeping Giant campground for more information and a map. Check out their cross-country ski trails in the winter, and be sure to take in Silver Islet and the submerged mines.
    Legend has it that the Giant lay down in order to prevent white men from getting at the silver mines owned by the Ojibway.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    Walk around Boulevard Lake

    by D_Shannon Written Feb 25, 2003

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    I'm almost tempted to put this entry under 'tourist traps' because, really, if you're in Thunder Bay there are plenty of real lakes nearby. This one is man-made and is often too polluted for swimming. There is a nice walk (about 45 minutes) around the edge of the lake across the dam, but be careful not to lose the path when it pops you out to the street - you have to find your way around an apartment building to get back on track. There's also a small children's playground, a beach area, lots of picnic space and some good duck and loon watching. This is a good place for biking, jogging or rollerblading and in the summer you can rent paddle boats and canoes.

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    • Cycling

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    Kakabeka Falls

    by brian43 Updated May 29, 2003

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    Kakabeka Falls

    About 20 minutes west of Thunder Bay are the second highest falls in the province. Campground nearby. Nice walking/hiking trail and observation platforms along the gorge heading down from the falls from the park visitors centre.

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    • National/State Park
    • Camping

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  • chris_i79's Profile Photo

    Terry Fox Lookout

    by chris_i79 Updated Sep 1, 2003

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    As you approach Thunder Bay from the East you are met by the Terry Fox Monument. This statue is dedicated to the heroic Terry Fox, who at 18 years of age tried to run accross Canada with an artifical leg to raise money for cancer research. Unfortunately he was unable to complete his marathon accross Canada because his condition continued to worsen.

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    Old Fort William

    by Toughluck Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Brigades arriving
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    Old Fort William is a reconstruction of the oldest settlement on the Canadian shore of Lake Superior. Originally located on Thunder Bay, Fort William was the commerical center of the Northwest Company of Canada and then the Hudson's Bay Company. Later, as the prairies were settled, Port Arthur developed further north on the bay, where the anchorage was better.

    As the trade with the natives changed, the transcontinental railroads purchase the shoreline property and expanded their rail yards for handling grain shipments from the west. Today, the original fort consist of some foundations beneath the railroad tracks. A sign points to where it once stood.

    Old Fort William is a reconstruction located west of town on the Kaministiquia River. It was the river, after all that determined the original location of the fort. The fur trade used the waterways as their 'railroads' and they needed to be close.

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    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park
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    TERRY FOX MEMORIAL.

    by Alphons Updated Aug 25, 2004

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    Teryy Fox Memorial.

    TERRY FOX MEMORIAL

    'Dreams are made if people only try.
    I believe in miracles...I have to...
    because somewhere the hurting must stop.'

    TERRANCE STANLEY FOX
    July 28, 1958-June 28, 1981

    Terry Fox inspired this nation with his dream - his Marathon of Hope - a cross-Canada run to raise money for cancer research.

    This courageous young man from Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, knew only too well the ravages of cancer --- because at 18 he had lost his right leg to the disease. And etched in his mind was the pain and suffering on the faces of other cancer victims. Determined not to leave this 'world of miracles' before a cure had been found, he planned his 5,300-mile marathon.

    After dipping his foot in the Atlantic, he began his epic in St. John's Newfoundland on April 12, 1980.

    Running 26 miles a day, this outstanding young athlete had conquered five provinces by the time had had reached Ontario In June. Then, at mile number 3,339, near this very site, recurring cancer forced him to give up his run. Through his perseverance in the face of overwhelming odds, he inspired an outpouring of immense national pride and a flood of $24 million for cancer research.

    Terry Fox inspired an entire generation of Canadians with his determination and devotion. And it was through his strength and commitment that he united Canadians as they have never been united before.

    It is for such a reason, this monument was designed, joining east with west, depicting all provincial and territorial coats-of-arms and the Canadian emblems of the maple leaf and beaver.

    It is a very impressend memorial.

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  • Eagle Rock Canyon Ziplining

    by pinkpanther2911 Written Aug 25, 2009

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    Eagle rock Canyon recently opened up their Zipline. The experience is quite exciting. Unfortunately, the cost is not appealing. It costs $75 to do the zipline, plus an additional $20 just to walk up to the zipline (approx a 5 minute walk). The cost really should just include the entrance fee as the walk up is nothing spectacular. The view from where you wait to ride the zipline is very nice. If the price stayed at its original $50 that included the entrance fee, before they double the cost, it would have made the experience much more enjoyable. It takes roughly 45 seconds to go all the way down the zipline, and if you go on a day that is not windy, you will get to experience the sights around you. Your best bang for your buck, is to go on the suspension bridges there. The bridges make for a more memorable experience in both the thrill of the height or the length of bridge to walk across. Watching people cross the bridge is also quite amusing, many people feel if they walk crouched down and slowly they will be safer. I was a victim of the armadillo walking position! haha.

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    Cascades Conservation Area

    by Skibum251 Updated Jul 26, 2004

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    Cascades

    I happened to stumble across this beautiful park one afternoon. It's a terrific spot for lunch and quick hike to the Cascades. There are numerous trails you can take depending on the length of hike you wish. I took one that followed the river all the way to the Cascades and back which took about an hour (red and yellow trails). Check the map at the entrance to the Conservation Area to see which trail suits you.

    The Cascades are a great spot for a quick dip in the river or for an evening campfire. It's an isolated bit of paradise right in the city!

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  • chris_i79's Profile Photo

    Camping at Sibley provincial park

    by chris_i79 Updated Sep 1, 2003

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    Sibley park is located on the Sleeping Giant peninsula and has many beautiful lake front campsites. It is about an hour drive from Thunder Bay. The picture was taken in the campsite about 20 meters from our tent. There are plenty of deer fox and bears in the park. You can see more pictures of Sibley park in the travelogues

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    The Aurora Borealis

    by chris_i79 Written Aug 12, 2003

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    had to resort to the internet, hard to photograph

    One of the special things about the North is being able to see the Northern Lights on a regular basis. I have seen the lights so many times I have lost count, in fact many nights in the fall I just have to glance out my window and there they are. It is difficult to describe what they look like, but try to imagine slow moving white flames in the night sky and you are on the right track.

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    Kakabeka Falls

    by yooperprof Updated Sep 5, 2012

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    got a barrel?
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    Kakabeka Falls is the second largest waterfall in Canada - now, I wonder if Niagara counts as the largest? At any rate, the waterfall here has both a considerable flow and a significant drop - close to 300 feet, and that's nearly sheer. Although it's a "managed fall" that is used for hydroelectric production, even in the middle of summer there's a tremendous visceral energy here that is absolutely mesmerizing for waterfall enthusiasts. Of which I am one.

    Kakabeka Falls is about 15 miles to the west of Thunder Bay Ontario. It's really quite a sight. The falls are steep and deep, and the river carries a significant flow, so there is usually quite a spectacle of foam and spray. The amount of water pouring through is actually managed (and limited) by the local electric generating company, so what the visitor sees on a normal day is really only a fraction of what the First Peoples and early voyageurs would have witnessed in previous times. But it's still a testament to the power of Nature.

    Kakabeka Falls produces an impressive amount of foam. Actually, it's the most foam I've ever seen at a waterfall. (Though I haven't been to Niagara, nor any of the other monster falls around the world.)

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    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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  • brian43's Profile Photo

    Trowbridge Falls - Centennial Park Trail

    by brian43 Written May 29, 2003

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    current river

    Nice hiking trail within the Thunder Bay city limits with lots a natural features.
    Follows the Current River that runs down to Boulevard Lake (manmade) and features recreational trails around the lake.

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  • chris_i79's Profile Photo

    Ouimet Canyon

    by chris_i79 Updated Sep 1, 2003

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    About 40 min east of Thunder Bay is Ouimet Canyon (pronounced "We Met" Canyon.

    I have lived in Thunder Bay for a long time but just recently made it to the canyon. Pretty impressive, steep cliffs, nice board walk trail.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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Thunder Bay Things to Do

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