history, Toronto

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  • history
    by Tolik
  • history
    by Tolik
  • history
    by Tolik
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    Only in the mid-20th century...

    by Tolik Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Favorite thing: Only in the mid-20th century was its utterly Anglo-Saxon ethos diluted, as immigrants arrived, first from northern, then from southern Europe, then from all around the world. The city is served by excellent public transportation, proudly called the best in North America.

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    The native name Toronto was...

    by Tolik Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Favorite thing: The native name Toronto was reinstated in 1834, when incorporated as a city, but a western city’s district keeps this name. When the Erie Canal was completed in 1825, Toronto no longer had to rely on Montreal as a port of entry but could use New York, the beginning of an American tie which has remained important ever since.

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    learn history of Toronto. The...

    by Tolik Updated Aug 25, 2002

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    Favorite thing: learn history of Toronto. The first European to visit the site of present-day Toronto seems to be the Frenchman Etienne Brulle, who came here in 1615 along an old native trail from Lake Huron, later used by English and Dutch fur traders from New York. In the early 18th century, the French built a fortcalled Fort Rouille to interfere with this trade, but it was abandoned in 1759. In the late 18th century, British interest in the area was boosted by the arrival of Loyalists who settled along the shore of Lake Ontario.In 1787 an area of land corresponding to modern-day Toronto was bought from the Missisauga natives for £1700. Six years later the plot was set aside as the site of a new town by John Graves Simcoe, Lieutenant General of Upper Canada. Simcoe’s superiors considered the spot a better place than Niagara-on-the-Lake, the province ‘s then capital, deemed too close to America. In 1794 the choice of a capital of newly created Upper Canada officially fell on Toronto (renamed York in honor of George III’s second son). The site still left much to be desired: “better calculated for a frog pond”, observed Simcoe, “than for the residence of human beings”.

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