Parks & Gardens, Toronto

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  • High Class Beaches Real Estate
    High Class Beaches Real Estate
    by Orchid
  • The path to the Ravine
    The path to the Ravine
    by Orchid
  • Climbing upslope
    Climbing upslope
    by Orchid
  • Orchid's Profile Photo

    Wilderness in the city - Glen Stewart Ravine

    by Orchid Written Aug 22, 2013
    The path to the Ravine
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    In the midst of 'The Beaches' commercial heart, on Queen Street East, a small park stands on the north side of the main road, between Glen Manor Drive & MaClean Avenue. It is called the Glen Stewart Park, and is the start of a walk through the Glen Stewart Ravine, It is quite remarkable. one minute, you are in a manicured park, with benches and flowerbeds and neat lawns, and the next you are on a wooden walkway, either side of which rise steep slopes, cloaked in undergrowth, above which rise huge mature red oak trees, up to 50m high,
    At the top of the slope, normal suburban houses back onto the ravine, but you could hardly believe that, in here, there is a city of 5 million people only 100m away.
    The path leads to wooden stairways, which rise to Kingston Road, or Beech Avenue. The walk back to Queen Street, through the quiet suburban streets reveals some of the fancier houses in The Beaches.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    High Park

    by brazwhazz Updated Apr 4, 2011
    River along West Ravine nature trail
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    Located just far enough from all major attractions to go unnoticed by tourists, High Park is the largest park in the city of Toronto, spanning 399 acres. Despite being off the beaten path, High Park is easily accessible by subway; High Park station, on the Bloor-Danforth Line, lies just north of the park's main entrance.

    It has very varied attractions, including nature trails, biking paths, a zoo (not to be confused with the larger Toronto Zoo!), a museum and a restaurant.

    Nature-lovers will no doubt want to explore the nature trails, which include some naturally preserved areas such as the oak savannas which offer a glimpse of what once covered most of the Toronto area.

    Parents will be happy to take their kids to the Jamie Bell Adventure Playground, shaped like a series of medieval castles, or to the zoo (even though it is not a petting zoo), where several a decent array of domestic and exotic animals live.

    As for the museum, it is devoted to John Howard, the man who deeded the land of High Park to the city of Toronto in 1876 on the condition that it remain "'for the free use, benefit and enjoyment of the citizens of Toronto and it be called High Park". You can visit Colborne Lodge, the Regency-style cottage Howard built for himself and his wife, as well as their large Victorian-era stone monument for around $C6.

    High Park can be a welcome change of pace from the busy streets of the downtown (and touristy) core.

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    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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    High Park - Back to Nature

    by penumbra Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Maple Leaf Garden
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    High Park is a long and narrow park. The south end is bounded by Queen street and holds a lake giving the area a wetlands appearance. The north is bounded by Bloor street and shows off more of the hilly terrain that dominates the park. Within the North half is the Grenadier restaurant and a small outdoor (organic) farmers market. The roads and pathways can be disorienting so the restaurant makes a good starting point and has a large parking lot if you’ve driven and would like to do some walking.

    Address: 1873 Bloor Street W

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    Rattray Marsh - Clarkson, Mississauga

    by kingco Written Sep 4, 2008

    Rattray Marsh is a great little park, located in a unique natural setting in the City of Mississauga . As the last remaining lakefront marsh between Toronto and Burlington , this environmentally sensitive wetland offers a different experience for nature lovers. Take a stroll along one of a series of raised wooden walkways through the park. 50 Bexhill Rd.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    Earl Bales Park in Toronto

    by freddie18 Updated Feb 23, 2008

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    Thank You for visiting Earl Bales' Park
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    Earl Bales Park is located in the West Don River Valley in North York, now part of Toronto. Tees and greens is everywhere in this huge park. If you are a Pinoy or originally from the Philippines, you should know this very popular place frequented along Bathurst Street especially during the summer months when it becomes the picnic ground with tables and barbecue grill. You can stay here all day long and even until night time. We have a lot of space here to celebrate birthdays, anniversaries, or just wanna have fun.

    In the photo I posted here, you will see a celebration being held at the 1,500-seat Barry Zukerman Amphitheatre. It is an entertainment courtesy of Filipino-Canadian showcasing song and folk dance.

    Come to Earl Bales Park at summertime. You will surely enjoy the park landscape.

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    • Skiing and Boarding

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    The Rouge Valley Park

    by Paul2001 Updated Aug 17, 2007

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    The Rough Valley
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    The Rough Valley is a large valley in the east end of Toronto. It is a remarkable park in that it is rare to see such wilderness so close to an urban centre. In fact the park is one of the largest urban parks in North America (the largest in Canada). Rough Park was founded in 1995 and occupying of 50 square kilometres of the Rouge River water shed. It also overlaps into the city of Markham, north of Toronto. The park is remarkable for its wildlife and hiking trails. Rare birds often stop here while migrating while many dears, foxes and even coyetes can be seen on the 12km of trails. Recently several ponds have been added to landfill area near the Toronto Zoo where you can see many geese and even swans. The Rough Park is also home to a campground and to a beach at its mouth on Lake Ontario. Oddly enough I have never visited the beach but I used go down to the Rough Valley while growing up nearby in the 1970's. I still travel out here and take in the hiking trails and I am always impressed by what I see. I have even come here to fish as the Rough River is full of trout.

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    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel

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  • calismt5's Profile Photo

    Running, Blading, Cycling, Strolling...its all goo

    by calismt5 Written Aug 17, 2007

    There is a series of parks which run into each other extending from North York down through to Lake Ontario. There are several miles of paths through which you can ride, run or blade. ( think it is 20+ miles )

    The most northern park is Edward's Gardens which is quite beautiful to take in on its own.

    If you are into exercising in a park setting in the middle of a cosmopolitan city then check it out. There are maps & guide books that any concierge should be able to hook you up with.

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    • Cycling
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Downtown Cows

    by pieter_jan_v Written Jun 18, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cows at Wellington street

    Yes, there are cows in the midst of the Toronto highrisers.

    I was surprised that there is a ribbon of small parks running along the skyscrapers. Furthermore, if you follow the route in between, you avoid the traffic on the major streets and the related traffic lights. Traffic just flows in flogs and there is room enough to cross the big streets beteen the major intersections.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

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    Autumn Maple Leaf in Toronto

    by freddie18 Updated Nov 1, 2006

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    Parks During Autumn Season
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    It's Autumn Season in Canada. The season that I always enjoy in my country. I particularly like the changing of the leaves with its attractive colours of red, orange, green, yellow.......

    Autumn is widely called Fall season in Canada and is in the months of September, October, and November. So, if you have not experienced the Fall in any country, come visit Toronto and we will show you around. We have a lot of it. Canada has Parks in every corner and have falling leaves everywhere, Maple Leaf in particular.

    You still have time, don't wait too long - you still have one month to go before the end of Autumn.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park

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    Toronto Music Gardens

    by Dabs Written Oct 19, 2005

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    Toronto Music Garden bandshell
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    On a rather overcast Sunday morning we headed to the harbour (spelled with a u to appease my Canucky tormentor rmdw) area and walked from the Union Station area to where the Toronto Music Gardens. Fellow Vter Greg (can't remember his screen name) recommended it and it was indeed a lovely stop.

    The Music Garden was designed by cellist Yo-Yo Ma and is often used as an outdoor musical venue. Even without the music, it's a lovely park to sit in, there are benches scattered throughout.

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    Edwards Gardens

    by hayward68 Updated Jun 8, 2005

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Edwards Garden

    (also) Toronto Botanical Garden
    This is a combination park - garden area. There's a teaching garden with labelled plants and lovely walking trails to enjoy, and also a large park area that's perfect for picnics. A gift shop near the parking lot also has lovely things to buy.
    Toronto Botanical Garden and Edwards Garden are separate entities though on the same site.
    Located at the corner of Lawrence Ave and Leslie St, there's a large parking lot off of Lawrence.
    This place is right around where I work and I sometimes go here for walks on my lunch break.
    Take either the Lawrence E or Leslie bus to get here.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Rouge Park

    by hayward68 Updated Jun 8, 2005

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    Rouge Park

    In Toronto's east end there is a gorgeous area known as Rouge Valley. It's the perfect place to go hiking for the day, especially in autumn when the leaves have all changed colours. Hiking trails abound and you can do the Rouge Valley Trail which starts near the Toronto Zoo, is 10km long and ends at Lake Ontario.
    Rouge Park is actually the largest urban area park in North America.
    It's a popular spot on sunny days and hard to believe it's so close to the urban areas.
    Dogs must be leashed at all times in this park.

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    • Budget Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Bela_LUng's Profile Photo

    Take a quiet walk in the park

    by Bela_LUng Updated Nov 17, 2004

    If you just want to chill out in the park for a bit and relax, then you can head to High Park for some quiet time. The park is, I believe, the largest park in Toronto. There's a petting zoo, and a restaurant in the park. You can grab some lunch on bloor street. This is a "park" like as you'll get for Toronto.

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  • Paula&Matt's Profile Photo

    sunbathe in the sunshine!

    by Paula&Matt Written Aug 27, 2004

    High park is huge. you can walk around it for hours, there is dog mountain, (or hill, i cant remember!) where people who walk their dogs and congragate before starting off home, a great chance to meet people (and their kanine friends) lots of wooded areas and a river running through it. It is fantastically beutifull all year round.

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  • mim95's Profile Photo

    High Park

    by mim95 Written Jun 3, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Japanese cherry blossoms in High Park

    High Park is a large piece of parkland located in southwestern Toronto, bounded by Bloor Street, The Queensway, Parkside Drive and Grenadier Pond.

    You will find forests, beautiful gardens, walking trails and even a zoo and a restaurant in High Park.

    Lots of sports activities that you can do here, as there are all kinds of facilities, such as baseball field, ice rink, swimming pool, tennis courts and football fields.

    You can get off at High Park subway station, then walk south to the park. There are also parkings available inside the park.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Zoo
    • Family Travel

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