City Hall & Nathan Phillips Square, Toronto

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  • City Hall & Nathan Phillips Square
    by kemisteryoso
  • City Hall & Nathan Phillips Square
    by kemisteryoso
  • City Hall & Nathan Phillips Square
    by tim07
  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Old City Hall

    by solopes Updated Jun 9, 2014

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    Built by the end of the 19Th century, and used only for seven decades, this building was supposed to be demolished and replaced by skyscrapers. A strong opposition forced to keep it, and it is now used by the municipal court.

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    Winter fun in Toronto

    by celsomollo Written Mar 9, 2013

    A great thing to do in Toronto in the winter is to go skating at the Toronto City Hall.
    There is a huge outdoors skate rink which is free to everyone and if you don't have a pair of skates you can rent one.

    Family fun Clock tower Taking it easy Panoramic View Ohhhhh
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    New City Hall

    by kemisteryoso Updated Nov 26, 2012

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    One of the distinctive landmarks in Toronto because of its design and architecture. Designed by Finnish architect Viljo Revell who actually won the international competition launched by mayor Nathan Philips in 1956 looking for new design of city hall which will going to be the 4th city hall of Toronto. Viljo dint see the his masterpiece because he died a year before its completion.
    It consists of 2 tower building surrounding a white disk office mounted on a raised platform. The two towers are of unequal height as the east tower is taller than the west. The east tower has 27 storeys and the west tower is 20 storeys. It had a reflecting pool, some monuments, fountains, concrete arches and overhead walkways. But during my visit May 2012, there are lots of renovations going around.
    The City Hall is nicknamed "The Eye of the Government" because it resembles a large eye in aerial view.

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    Old City Hall

    by tim07 Updated Dec 28, 2011

    Old City Hall overlooks the square and was the seat of city government from 1899 until 1965 when it was replaced by the current City Hall.

    The square is named after Nathan Phillips who was Mayor of Toronto from 1955 to 1962. This public square is the site for many special events and civic activities.

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    City Hall & Nathan Phillips Square

    by spidermiss Updated May 1, 2011

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    Nathan Phillips Square

    Nathan Phillips, named after a former Toronto Mayor, Square is a large square in front of the City Hall. The square holds many civic and special events throughout the year. In winter, the square is temporarily converted in a popular ice skating rink.

    In the centre of the square there is The Peace Gardens and various sculptures are dotted around the city.

    City Hall

    Mayor Nathan Philips, then the mayor, in 1957 commissioned Viljo Revell, a Finnish architect, to design a new City Hall. Revell designed it as such that the building would have a striking and symbolic presence in the city. The City Hall was completed and Governor Vanier opened the building.

    Old City Hall

    This was known as Toronto's third City Hall which is at the opposite end of the square to the new City Hall. The building was designed by Edward James Lennox and built in 1899 and were Toronto Council offices until 1965. Today the Old City Hall is now a Provicial courthouse.

    City Hall & Nathan Phillips Square Old City Hall & Nathan Phillips Square Old City Hall, Toronto, Canada Near Nathan Phillips Square, Toronto, Canada Near Nathan Phillips Square, Toronto, Canada
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    City Hall.

    by Regina1965 Written Jan 27, 2010

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    The magnificent twin tower City Hall building in Toronto was designed by the Finnish architect Viljo Revell. In City Hall there are 15 departments, a 23-member City Council and 7.000 employees.

    Inside of City Hall on the ground floor you can see the corner stone of the buliding.

    City Hall in Toronto.

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    Ice Skating at Nathan Phillips Square

    by kehale Written Oct 25, 2009

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    One of the best things about visiting Toronto in the winter is going for an ice skate at Nathan Phillips Square in front of City Hall! The rink is very well maintained, and your best bet is to be putting your skates on using the benches next to the ice. The rink is open from first light until 10pm, at which time the lights at the rink are turned off. The rink is usually pretty busy, and there is always a mix of really great skaters right down to young kids learning their way around the rink.
    Their is an opportunity to rent skates, even though I've never had to. For more information you can visit the City of Toronto website. They always list ice conditions, so if you are visiting in early or late winter months you will know if the rink is open for the public.
    It really is a great outdoor rink in the heart of everything. So after going for a skate you can always head over to the Eaton Centre - leave your skates in a locker and go shopping or grab something to eat!

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    New & Old Toronto City Hall

    by apbeaches Written Aug 22, 2009

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    The City Hall of Toronto, Ontario, Canada is one of the most distinctive landmarks of the city. Designed by Finnish architect Viljo Revell, landscape architect Richard Strong, and engineered by Hannskarl Bandel, the building opened in 1965; its modernist architecture still impresses today. It was built to replace Old City Hall, across the street, which was built in 1899. The old City Hall Building is now a Criminal Court House.

    Old City Hall through New City Hall fountains New Toronto City Hall

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    Toronto city halls

    by brazwhazz Written May 14, 2009

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    Interestingly, the current city hall and former city hall of Toronto are across the street from each other. When the new one was built, the old one was meant to be destroyed, but this provoked such a public outcry that it was preserved.

    The current city hall, designed by Finnish architect Viljo Revell, was opened in 1965. Its peculiar form has made it one of the symbols of Toronto. There are 45-minute guided tours of the building; if you are interested, it is recommended to book at least 2 weeks in advance by contacting the city of Toronto at accesstoronto@toronto.ca or 416-338-1200. You can also do a self-guided tour by downloading and/or printing the following page: http://www.toronto.ca/accesstoronto/self_guided_tour.htm.

    The former city hall, opened in 1899, was drawn up by renowned Toronto architect E. J. Lennox, who designed over 70 buildings in the city. (His other well-known and popular building is the Casa Loma mansion.) It was declared a National Historic Site in 1989. You can take a peek inside here as well, and there are exhibits presented on the first floor. The following page has a description of the main features: http://www.toronto.ca/old_cityhall/old_cityhall_tour.htm.

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  • freddie18's Profile Photo

    Toronto's Old City Hall

    by freddie18 Updated Jan 25, 2009

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    It has to be noted that the tourist spot in the intersection of Bay & Queen Streets which is known as the Old City Hall is the third built by the City of Toronto. The first city hall was burned down. The second is located inside the St Lawrence Market. The third is the popular Old City Hall. The fourth is the current or New City Hall. The Old City Hall was designed by EJ Lennox in 1887 to fit central site at head of Bay Street. In one structure, these municipal buildings combined on City Hall in the east portion and Court House in the west. The building, constructed mostly of sandstone from Credit River Valley was begun in 1889. Massive, round arched, and richly carved. It is in the Romanesque Revival style then popular in expanding cities throughout North America. The interior, as complex and monumental as the exterior, includes a large stained glass. One of the highlights of the Old City Hall is the Clock Tower which measures 300 feet tall. On Decembeer 31, 1900, the bells rang for the first time the largest of which is called Big Ben weighing 11,648 pounds. Come visit the Old City Hall of Toronto and the other "must see" attractions are just within walking distance.

    A View of the Old Toronto City Hall Signs at the Old Toronto City Hall A View of the Old Toronto City Hall
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    Toronto Landmark - City Hall at the Square

    by freddie18 Updated Jan 25, 2009

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    The Toronto City Hall is within the Nathan Phillips Square in Downtown Toronto. The square is named after Nathan Phillips, the Mayor from 1955 to 1962.

    This tourist attraction became popular to both tourists and Canadians. The locals congregate around the pool to relax and people watch in the summer time and enjoy the Peace Garden in the middle. It is also at this season of the year when free concerts, dance performances and art exhibition are being held. You will also enjoy winter season in Toronto. The pool is being used and transformed as an outdoor skating rink. Please be aware that there are skates for rent in a small building at the square.

    In one of the photos I posted here, you will see the arches over the pond or ice rink. This is called the Freedom Arches that was built in the Year 1989. There are still a lot to see at the Square to make your stay in Toronto a memorable one. Other tourist attractions can be reached on foot if you enjoy walking.

    Come visit Toronto and I will show you around the downtown core including the most visited Nathan Phillips Square and The New Toronto City Hall.

    Toronto City Hall Toronto City Hall Toronto City Hall & Nathan Phillips Square Toronto City Hall Around the City Hall and Nathan Phillips Square
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    Old City Hall - A National Trust Building

    by Mikebb Written Jul 7, 2008

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    This is a beautiful old building designed by architect Edward James Lennox and officially opened during September 1899. It took over a decade to construct at a cost of $2.5 million and has been included on the Canadian Historic Buildings Register.

    At the time of opening it was the city's biggest structure and also the largest municipal building in North America.

    The new City Hall was opened in 1965 and is located close by.

    Old City Hall Old City Hall
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    New City Hall

    by Mikebb Updated Jul 6, 2008

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    This building design was the result of an international competion won by architect Viljo Revell of Helsinki. The Building was opened on 13th September, 1965.

    The main floor of the building houses the Hall Of Memory, a scale model of the city showing major attractions and upcoming changes to the area.

    A beautiful building set back with forecourt and water features it is well worth a visit.

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    Activities galore at Nathan Phillips Square

    by Faiza-Ifrah Written Oct 26, 2007

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    We found Nathan Phillips Square to be a lively public gathering place located immediately in front of Toronto City Hall on one side and the Shearaton Gardens on the other, on the northwest corner of Queen and Bay Streets.

    The Square is named for Nathan Phillips, who was Mayor of Toronto from 1955 to 1962.

    In summers we have found people gathering here to watch music concerts or just to relax by the pool and take pictures of the surrounding buildings. We have regularly visited the Square in the summers to watch concerts and parades of various groups (see pictures).

    In winter, the pool is transformed into a popular outdoor skating rink (see pictures).

    We visited Nathan Phillips Square when it hosted a spectacular display of fireworks and light last year, which it routinely does every year on Saturday nights starting late-November (see pictures). Participating neighbourhoods around the city also display dozens of colourful light patterns.

    Ample underground parking is available and at very economical rates.

    A music concert in progress (August) Cavalcade of Lights (in December)
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    Old City Hall

    by mikey_e Written Sep 30, 2007

    This is, as my sister would say, personal preference, but I think that Toronto's old City Hall is far prettier and more appropriate for a world class city than the current City Hall. Then again, that's just me. The Old buildings are located just across Bay Street from the new ones, so you can see both in a matter of minutes. It is currently a courthouse (so consider yourself lucky if you're not visiting the interior). The structure itself is in Romanesque revival style and was begun in 1889by architect E.J. Lennox. It was used as a City Hall between 1899 and 1966 (when administration was moved to Nathan Philips Square). The cenotaph, in front of the steps, is a memorial to those soldiers who lost their lives in the two World Wars and the Korean War, and is frequently the site of Remembrance Day ceremonies on November 11.

    The clock tower in profile Fa��ade of the Old City Hall The Cenotaph Close up of the western wing
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