Chinatown, Montreal

3.5 out of 5 stars 22 Reviews

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  • Chinatown
    by GentleSpirit
  • Chinatown
    by GentleSpirit
  • In Chinatown.
    In Chinatown.
    by Regina1965
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    Chinatown

    by GentleSpirit Updated Feb 26, 2013

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    As I was walking along exploring I saw this building with what looked like a Chinese temple on top of it. At first I filed it away and promised myself to go check it out in a bit. Coming closer i wandered on and found the paifang, the traditional chinese archway that signifies the entry into Chinatown. Its along St Laurent, if you keep going you will find lots of little restaurants and shops. Some of them were chinese dolls, party good but you also had herbal treatments, acupuncture.

    This is the old Chinatown. Due to redevelopment needs of the city, some of it has made way for other non-Chinese buildings. At the same time, some of the east asian community has moved to Chinatown West (Ste Catherine, near Concordia University.) There is also a large community that was invited to settle in the suburb of Bossard.

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    Le quartier chinois de Montréal - Chinatown.

    by Regina1965 Updated Jun 14, 2010

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    The entrance to Chinatown.
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    As always I head straight for Chinatown when visiting a new city. Love Chinatown. There are several small Chinatowns in Montréal, but the largest official one is the one I visited. It has got a traditional Chinese gate where you enter on Saint Laurent Bouleward. It is a fun area, with lots of Chinese shops, food stores and restaurants. And a good tourist attraction they say.

    What I missed though in Chinatown in Montréal is clothes-stores, the only clothes-stores they had sold traditional Chinese clothes. I wonder why as in many countries the Chinese have got so many good clothes-stores and I usually buy my clothes in their stores.

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    Chinatown

    by Tom_Fields Written Oct 8, 2009

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    This arch greets visitors to Chinatown
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    Montreal's Chinatown dates back to about 1860, when the earliest Chinese immigrants settled here. The neighborhood evolved from mostly residential to primarily commercial. Of course, this is one of Montreal's best places to eat, with bargains on good meals.

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    Chinatown

    by pieter_jan_v Written Sep 14, 2009
    Chinese vegetables vendor
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    As most big Canadian cities Montréal has a Chinese quarter.
    At the four major entrances you are welcome by the typical dragon gates.

    Around 1860 Chinese immigrants came to Montreal in search of work and they settled mainly on de la Gauchetiere and lower St. Laurent Blvd.

    Try one of the typical restaurants in the area.

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  • victorwkf's Profile Photo

    Chinatown and other attractions

    by victorwkf Updated Aug 21, 2009
    Chinatown at Montreal, Canada
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    The Chinatown in Montreal is conveniently located at the city centre area, and consists of many shops and restaurants. This is perhaps the only area which I went to besides my hotel while I was at Montreal in Feb 2009.

    For tips on restaurants in Chinatown, please go to the "restaurant" section of this VT page.

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    Visiting Chinatown

    by fairy_dust Updated Dec 27, 2008

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    Chinatown is like a piece of China outside of China. All the store signs and posters are in Chinese, and in most places, Chinese is the language spoken first. Chinatown is filled with all sorts of little shops, grocery stores (selling food imported from China), dim sum restaurants, etc. In summer, there are street vendors on the sidewalk selling their stuff.

    But girls, please remember that since most Chinese women are very petite, you might have a hard time finding clothes that fit if you're bigger than a size 2 or have feet bigger than size 7. I wanted to buy a pair of shoes once, but the store didn't carry that particular style in my shoe size (compared to most Chinese women, I have huge clown feet - size 9.5).

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  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    Chinatown Montréal

    by King_Golo Written Nov 26, 2007

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    Teas and medicines for sale in Chinatown

    Like many other North American cities, Montréal has its own Chinatown. The area around Boulevard St. Laurent and Rue de la Gauchetière is where a large part of Montréal's Asian population lives. You're very likely to hear people speaking Chinese and Vietnamese, the shops offer exotic spices and fruits and the air smells like Chinese food for take-away. One Asian restaurant neighbours the next, so if you enjoy Chinese food, this is the place to be. Apart from the restaurants and the slightly exotic flavour, there's not too much to see in Chinatown. Just walk around and let the area affect you.

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    Quartier chinois

    by eternel2002 Updated May 30, 2007
    Chinatown

    Chinatown Montreal is a small quarter in the city center, located in Old Montreal, it's about 3 blocks, it is not that big or impressibe as it is in other cities; such New york and San francisco but still it's a place where you can find kind of chinese atmosphere with chinese restaurants, chinese shops ..etc

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  • mim95's Profile Photo

    Chinatown

    by mim95 Updated Jun 28, 2006

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    Chinese archway marks the entrance of Chinatown
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    Montreal's Chinatown is very small, compared to Toronto or Vancouver. Chinese immigrants arrived here in late 19th century. There is a giant traditional archway at St. Laurent and Viger, a smaller one can be found on the narrow pedestrian only La Gauchetiere, just east of St. Laurent. You can find many cheap food here - Chinese or Vietnamese.

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    Chinatown

    by Carmanah Updated Jan 10, 2006

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    Chinatown in the winter - Dec 27, 2005
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    Chinatown is a relatively small neighbourhood of downtown Montreal. I didn't actually spend a whole lot of time here, and it wasn't really evident to me where Chinatown started and ended.

    Montreal's Chinatown is predominantly centred around St-Laurent and Gaucheti?re. This part of Gaucheti?re is pedestrian-only. Apparently in the 1950's a lot of its buildings were demolishes, and Chinatown's existence was threatened. However, since the 1980's, more effort has been put into reclaiming Chinatown and its heritage.

    Coming from Vancouver, a city with a huge Chinese population, I found Montreal's Chinatown somewhat underwhelming, and yet, it was wonderful. Just like most Canadian cities, Montreal's Chinese community isn't confined to Chinatown - its community lives all over the city and its suburbs. Chinatown represents Montreal's Chinese heritage, and how a community can exist and thrive among the dominating cultures of the French and English speaking worlds.

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    Quartier Chinois (Chinatown)

    by Blatherwick Updated Dec 23, 2005

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    Montreal Chinatown
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    Montreal has a small but active Chinatown (Quartier Chinois) just south of downtown. The primary part of Chinatown is pedestrian-only. It features many Chinese shops and restaurants, as well as a number of Vietnamese establishments. Some of the Chinese restaurants offer dim sum from seven a.m. to three p.m. The Vietnamese places have some pretty good pho soup. It makes for a good hour visit to stroll into the shops.

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    ni hao..

    by pehsan Updated Nov 20, 2005

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    tang ren jie (chinatown)
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    of course, just like in every other canadian city, there is a chinatown!! and as a chinese of course I had to go see for myself. this chinatown is pretty small, a little bigger than in ottawa, but nothing compared to toronto or vancouver of course.

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  • Stellaluna's Profile Photo

    Chinatown

    by Stellaluna Written Jul 20, 2004

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    Chinatown is an obvious place to start when looking for Asian goods; there are countless groceries and speciality shops between Viger, St-Denis, René-Lévesque and St-Urbain, and you can even try out ginseng and other 2,000-year-old herbal treatments.

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    Busy streets of Chinatown

    by acemj Updated May 16, 2004

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    Chinatown is a great, cheap place to grab a bite to eat. You can select from Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese and Japanese cuisine among others. And, of course, there are also great herb stores and stores where you can find all kinds of Asian manufactured, inexpensive items.

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  • Chinatown

    by peach93 Written Apr 9, 2004

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    Robert, at Chinatown Gates

    Montreal's Chinatown is smaller than some, but has everything that a good Chinatown needs. It is loaded with authentic dim sum restaurants and noodle shops, groceries, and import stores. Some of the best shopping we found in the city was here, as the merchants are all very willing, even expect, to bargain prices with you. I went home with a gorgeous silk bag for only $20 Canadian. This is also a great place to get a delicious and inexspensive lunch. It is located right near the Old City, so stopping by on your way to or from there is easy.

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