Metro, Montreal

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  • Montreal Metro
    Montreal Metro
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    by GracesTrips
  • tiabunna's Profile Photo

    Public transport

    by tiabunna Updated Jan 9, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    M��tro station
    3 more images

    The Montréal Métro was built as recently as the 1960s, so you are entitled to expect that it will be fairly modern. It is – and also it’s clean, quick and inexpensive, if sometimes a little crowded when we travelled (despite appearances in the main photo).

    Montréal has, sensibly, followed the trend toward linking travel on both the Métro and the bus system, so one ticket can be used on either system. We purchased three day tickets which, as can be seen in photo 2, are in the form of ‘scratch’ tickets from a Métro station. When we visited, the cost for these tickets was $9 for one day, $17 for three days, and they provide unlimited travel in that period. This photo also shows a map of the system, which follows the Paris Métro practice of each line being represented by a colour and the direction identified by the station at the end.

    Photos 3 and 4 show another Métro station and one of the city’s buses.

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  • Marie-Claude's Profile Photo

    Montreal's Metro

    by Marie-Claude Written Apr 22, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The subway system works really good if there is nobody that jumps in front of it...
    When you take a transfer ticket, you can travel for 1.30h within all the stm system, you can go out the subway and take the bus with your ticket. But you can't take the metro back either take the same bus.
    The prices are higher each 6 months to a year. For adults it is 2.50 $ and for children 1.25$. You can buy a "lisière" that is 6 tickets and you save money.
    they have one day card, but it is expensive...
    Good travelling!

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  • nicolettart's Profile Photo

    Metro

    by nicolettart Written Jan 16, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The metro is Montreal is extremely convenient, seemed to be very efficient, and easy to decipher. There are a few lines, and I think you can go around the entire city in basically a square (changing trains here or there). The easiest and cheapest way to get around!

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  • The Metro

    by peach93 Updated Jun 18, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you have ridden on the subway in Boston or New York, you will be amazed at how quiet the Montreal Metro is. The trains run on rubber wheels, eliminating nearly all of the ear-splitting din common in other subway systems. The Metro is extremely clean and efficient, the trains running in both directions every few minutes. It is the most convenient and economical way to get around the city as there are Metro stops nearly everywhere anyone could want to go.

    To ride the Metro you must purchase a ticket. Tickets are sold in singles or in strips of 6. Buying 6 is not only more economical--you get two of them free if you go by the single ticket price--but it will also help you avoid waiting in line as often. Tickets are fed directly into the turnstiles at the Metro entrance. I found that getting the turnstile to accept the ticket and turning the mechanical arm simultaneously a bit tricky, getting myself stuck more than once--much to the annoyance of the attendants. However, if you are less clumsy that I am you should be fine! Tickets are sold in Metro stations and at many retail stores. Maps of the Metro are available in most hotels and at Metro stations.

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  • marcoparco's Profile Photo

    Metro

    by marcoparco Written Mar 15, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Metro

    I was truly impressed by Montreal's public transportation. The metro is amazingly well kept and well set up! There is only 6 or 7 lines which makes it easy to learn how to utilize it. If the metro won't get you where you want to go, the bus definetly will.

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  • lotta29's Profile Photo

    The best way to get around

    by lotta29 Updated Mar 31, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You'll find a station under this kind of sign

    The easiest way to get from place to place in Montreal is the subway. There are 4 lines (yellow, green, blue and orange). A ticket costs 2,5 CAD and the selling system is the stupidest I've ever seen =) You pay for your ticket, the cashier hands it to you and you immediately give it back!
    If you know you'll be using the metro a lot, you'll save money by buying a six-ticket strip or a tourist card for 1 or 3 days.

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Metro

    by Dabs Written Jul 13, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We like to walk so we didn't take the metro much but we did ride it a couple of times in order to get to the Island of Ste. Helene and back. We bought a 6 ticket strip for $11.50 CA, a savings over the individual price of $2.50 per ride. Since they come in a strip of tickets you can use for up to 6 people.

    The metro was clean and fast and easy to use. To get out of the Metro, follow the signs that say "Sortie" (French for exit). To locate the metro stations, look for the blue signs with the arrow pointing down.

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    No "Mind The Gap" on the Montreal Metro!

    by johngayton Updated Apr 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    N0
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    Being a fairly modern system Montreal's Metro has many unique characteristics and one of the first things that I noticed about it is that the trains and platforms have actually been built with each other in mind. So, unlike our much-loved London Tube, there is virtually no gap between the train and platform and they are both on the same level.

    The second thing that struck me was how quiet the trains are. This was the first Metro to run on rubber wheels, rather than steel, which, as well as cutting down noise. also reduces vibration (and hence structural wear and tear), makes for a smoother ride and makes it easier for the trains to climb the various track inclines.

    Not only are the trains and platforms well-designed but so too are the stations. Each station is individual and most have their own collection of artworks - Square Victoria even has an authentic art nouveau Parisian "Metropolitian" sign. Further on the cultural front, buskers are encouraged and have designated performance areas (but noise must be kept below 80 decibels) and some stations have large screen televisions which double-up as the train information boards.

    Yep - it's a pretty impressive system. Second website below has loads more useful and interesting info.

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  • Gwenvar's Profile Photo

    Our all underground Metro

    by Gwenvar Updated Jan 1, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Map of Montr��al's m��tro network

    Montréal's Métro is one of the safest around. It is very clean. And everyone takes it.
    It's even an art experience!
    Even before the beginning of its construction in the early 60s, Montréal’s metro was promised to have a style of its own: Every station was to be conceived by a distinct architect. Instead of travelling on a system where all stations are alike. Montrealers would commute in a system where every station is unique and decorated with artworks. In fact, initiators of the project, leaded by mayor Jean Drapeau, insisted that art be integrated to stations. Thenceforth, the population of Montréal came into contact with an aspect of our culture that was until then only seen in museums.

    The fare is not expensive if you know how to make it work for you. There is a tourist Card that sells for $8.00 / 1 day or $16.00 / 3 days. You can also pay $2.50 cash each time or $11.25 for a six-ticket strip. What I recommend, if you are to stay more than a day, is the Weekly Pass called "CAM hebdo" $18.00 for a whole week, but only from Monday to Sunday. Otherwise, there is the Monthly Pass called "CAM", $61.00. For reduced fares look on their web site to see if you are eligible.
    If you are to take the bus afterwards, take a transfer at the station at which you enter. You can also enter the metro with your bus transfer.

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  • rmdw's Profile Photo

    Getting around Montreal on the Metro

    by rmdw Updated Aug 31, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Montreal Metro Map

    If you're visiting Montreal and don't need to be out in the suburbs then I'd strongly suggest you avoid renting a car as the metro system is excellent. If you're going to be here for just a few days then buy a package of 6 tickets (ask for 6 'billets' (pronounced: "sees bee-lay"). If you're going to stay longer then buy weekly passes but be aware that the passes run Monday through Sunday so buying a pass late in the week might not save you any money.

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  • Tom_In_Madison's Profile Photo

    Montreal Metro /subway system

    by Tom_In_Madison Updated Jun 17, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The weekly metrpo pass, mine ran from May 8 - 14.
    1 more image

    Nice fairly inexpensive, clean metro service.

    There are 4 lines criss-crossing each other. Transferring from one to another is incredibly easy and quick, and you never have to walk far like you do in some Paris or London transfer spots.

    The weekly pass only starts on a Monday and runs until the end of Sunday night. So if you get here on a thursday, you’re screwed. This is the only thing I don’t like about it, not sure why this is. They could make this change easily and it would probably save money too because the tickets wouldn't have the date on them.

    Single tickets are C$2.75 or you can get 6 tickets for C$11. I think the weekly pass was about C$18.

    The doors you have to open can sometimes be unbelievably heavy to open. Add in a little wind and you really got to push or pull to get thru these things. I’m fairly strong, but man, sometimes I had to lean into these door with all my might to budge them. Be careful trying to get in, may not look as easy as it seems. Maybe this is because of the cold winters, they want them to be harder to open?? Of course, sometimes the doors are held open for you, especially at the entrance and exit of Berri-UQAM train station by guys holding empty tip cups.

    Berri-UQAM Metro stop connects to the Berri-UQAM bus station by an escalator. You may get into Montreal by the bus and it will stop here-convenient.

    If you have the pass, just hold it in your right hand with the face facing you, and slid it thru the reader, then push the turnstile.
    If you have a single ticket, jut deposit it in the little box next to the worker in the booth.

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  • tpal's Profile Photo

    Wold Class Subway and...Shopping Too!

    by tpal Written Sep 1, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Montreal Metro

    We drove to Montreal but once we arrived our first choice was to walk around town. Montreal is a large city, however, and often the area we wanted to explore was some distance away. If necessary we took the car but most often parking was a problem especially in Old Town.

    The better choice was to use the Montreal Metro or subway system. It is efficient, clean and seemingly quite safe. It allowed us to maximize our walking distances. As Montreal is quite hilly in areas, by riding the Metro to the high point of the city, near Mount Royal for instance, we could enjoy a leisurely stroll downhill.

    There is an added benefit. The Metro system is part of what is know as Underground Montreal. Many of the stops are connected to a vast underground shopping mall permitting comfortable shopping even during Montreal's less than tropical winters.

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  • Marisola's Profile Photo

    The Easiest Way Around Montreal!

    by Marisola Updated May 30, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Montreal Metro
    2 more images

    The Montreal Metro System is an underground train metro (subway) system which can get you anywhere in the city for only $2.75 per destination (transfers are free). It is very easy to use, with four different colored lines. Check the metro map to locate your route. No traffic or parking worries. It is also clean and safe!

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  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    Métro

    by marielexoteria Updated Oct 7, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    M��tro ticket: front
    1 more image

    We used the métro to go downtown from the Greyhound bus terminal at the Berri-UQAM station. We only bought single tickets, as we weren't going to stay long and we were walking to the few sights close to Ste-Catherine street. A single ticket will only be used once and costs 2.75 CAN, but if you buy 6 they'll cost you 12 CAN.

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Practicalites

    by johngayton Updated Apr 15, 2009

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    Metro Map (from website)

    The Metro is definitely the easiest way to get aound Montreal and the 4 lines with their 68 stations will take you pretty much wherever you want to be. The Metro also connects with the rest of the public transport system (local bus, commuter train services and the main national bus and train stations) and so you can get anywhere in the world from your local Metro station!

    The Metro is very easy to use with distinctive signage indicating which line you are travelling on and the train's direction and there are plenty of maps around the stations and also available from the station and tourist offices.

    The main Metro lines run from 5.30 am until 1 am, 7 days a week, and a half-hour later on Saturday nights (the blue line starts at 6 and finishes at 12.15). The trains are frequent (about every 10 minutes early morning/late evening and up to every 3 minutes during the rush hours), clean, safe and reliable.

    At the time of writing (April 2009) the single fare is $2.75 per trip, regardless of distance, and allows for transfers within the system. You can also use the ticket on local buses by obtaining a correspondance (transfer) from either the ticket office or from a machine inside the Metro turnstile which is valid for 90 minutes - tho' it should be noted that the correspondance must be obtained at the start of the journey.

    There are also various other ticket options including a carnet of 6 tickets for $12.75, a 1 day tourist pass for $9 and a 3 day tourist pass for $17 - the tourist passes are valid for unlimited travel on both Metro and Bus and don't require correspondances.

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