Other museums, Quebec

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  • Morrin Centre
    Morrin Centre
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Maison Chevalier
    Maison Chevalier
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Maison Chevalier
    Maison Chevalier
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Greggor58's Profile Photo

    Musee du Fort...Another History Lesson... : O ]

    by Greggor58 Updated Oct 20, 2008

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    This is a tiny museum detailing the Battle of Quebec in 1759...and is a "sound and light" diorama that is a scale model of the town of Quebec and area at the time that Wolfe captured Quebec in the Summer of 1759.

    Through the use of narration and lights and even smoke the story of the invasion and battle is described..

    This illustration of history has been running since 1965 and is a good way to get up to speed on the events that preceded and occurred during the invasion.

    There are also some small exhibits illustrating life in New France in the early 1600's as well as some artifacts recovered from archaeological digs such as cannon balls,early types of grenades and mortar shells.

    It was a great way to avoid the rain of the morning....and I learned a little too... : O ]

    There is a small boutique selling scale models of cannons and soldiers and other odds and ends...

    Musee du Fort,Quebec City,Quebec,Canada. Musee du Fort,Quebec City,Quebec,Canada. Musee du Fort,Quebec City,Quebec,Canada. Musee du Fort,Quebec City,Quebec,Canada.
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    Maison Henry-Stuart, an English cottage in Quebec

    by Jefie Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Built in 1849, the Henry-Stuart house is one of the few examples left of the typical English cottages that were built in the city during the 19th century. It is named after the Henry family, for whom the house was originally built, and the Stuart family, the longest occupants of the cottage. Adele and Mary Stuart lived in the cottage for a total 70 years, from 1918 to 1988. Throughout the years, they made several trips to England, looking for furniture that could match the character of their house. They also worked on the charming garden that surrounds the house. A visit to the Henry-Stuart house is interesting in that it allows us to explore the history and culture of Quebec City's anglophone population, something that is often overlooked elsewhere in the city. The guided tour includes tea and homemade lemon cake, served in the cottage's drawing room. A really neat and different experience!

    From June 25 to Labour Day, tours run every day on the hour (first visit starts at 11:00 am, last visit starts at 4:00 pm). The price is $7 for adults.

    Maison Henry-Stuart, on Grande Allee
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    La Vieille Maison des Jesuites

    by Jefie Written Jul 19, 2006

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    Built around 1730, the Maison des Jesuites dates back to the days of New France and has a rich history. The Jesuite congregation first established a mission in Sillery in 1635 to promote its religion and way of live to the Native people. The mission was very successful, but soon enough many Natives succombed to European diseases such as the small pox and measles, and the mission was abandoned. Today, it is still possible to visit the small cemetery where they were all buried, just in front of the Maison.

    A new house was built in 1730 and after the English conquest in 1760, it was rented out to British colonists who came to Quebec City. One of its most famous residents was British writer Frances Brooke, who wrote the novel "The History of Emily Montague" (1769), the first English novel set in Canada.

    In 1929, the historical value of the house was officially recognized by the Government of Quebec and steps were taken to turn the place into a history museum. Today, the Maison houses different historical exhibitions and activities, including a permanent exhibition on the history of the house and the Sillery mission which includes many artefacts dating back to several hundred years ago. On wednesday evenings in summer, the Maison also offers free outdoor folk and world music concerts.

    La Vieille Maison des Jesuites in Sillery, Quebec Native burial ground at la Maison des Jesuites Frances Brooke's writing corner
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    Quebecoise Art...Musee des beux Arts

    by Greggor58 Written Oct 20, 2008

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    I happened to visit during an exhibit from the Louvre which in fact is only running until the 26th of October...this in itself was worth the visit...however I spent most of my time looking at the various works in the permanent collection of Jean-Paul Riopelle..who was born in Montréal in 1923, Jean-Paul Riopelle is one Québec’s best-known painters on the international scene.He lived the last years of his life on Isle-aux-Grues, where he died in 2002.

    In 2005, the Musée acquired the Brousseau collection of Inuit Art...and this is also a part of the permanent exhibit... Raymond Brousseau a Quebecker spent almost 50 years amassing this collection,pieces from all over the Canadian Arctic...

    The other sections of the permanent colection include works by Pellan, Borduas, Dallaire and many other artists of Quebec heritage...

    I managed to sneak a few photos inside the gallery..I was told in a nice way that photos were NOT allowed....so I put the camera away...

    It was a wonderful way to spend a few hours....I would highly recommend visiting !!

    Approaching the entrance to Musee des beux Arts... Musee des beux Arts,Louvre Exhibit,Quebec City. Musee des beux Arts,Louvre Exhibit,Quebec City.
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    Interpretation Center...Place Royale...

    by Greggor58 Written Oct 20, 2008

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    This is a small but well organized museum focusing on the history of the very first years of the settlement of New France and in particular the earliest days of Quebec City.

    There is a 3-D movie that shows throughout the day about Champlain which was fun to watch...

    The other exhibits include a diorama of Quebec City after the first year or two of occupation,there are collections of items discovered in archaeological digs throughout the area and small and informative exhibits and displays.

    I thought the film was fun...and if you have any interest in viewing "things" from the past than you should enjoy your time spent here.

    Admission is $ 5.00 and includes the film which alternates between a French and an English version every other hour.

    Interpretation Center,Place Royale,Quebec City. Interpretation Center,Place Royale,Quebec City. Interpretation Center,Place Royale,Quebec City.
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    The oldest school for girls in North America

    by mim95 Written Nov 27, 2003

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    The Ursuline Convent is a complex of buildings with a girls' school, monastery, chapel and museum.

    The Ursuline School is the oldest school for girls in North America. It was founded in 1639 by Marie de l'Incarnation and laywoman Madame La Peltrie, who came from France to help the new colony. Today, it is still a private girls school.

    The old monastery is one of the few remaining 17th century buildings in Quebec City. It still has its original wooden walls and staircase. There are about 60 Ursulines living in the monastery.

    The chapel is built in 1902, but the interior remained the same as the original, which was built in 1723, including some sculptures by Pierre-Noel Levasseur dated back to 1730s. The nave is decorated with paintings from the 17th and 18th centuries.

    The museum occupies a house built in 1836, on the site of the former residence of Madame La Peltrie. It has many pieces of ornate embroidery, art, and furnitures from the 17th century.

    The Ursuline Convent in Quebec
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  • tiabunna's Profile Photo

    Musée du Fort

    by tiabunna Updated May 2, 2008

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    Our walking tour guide recommended that we visit the Musée du Fort , near the Place d’Armes, for a good explanation of Québec’s military history. So we went along and headed up the stairs, arriving just in time for the next display. Passing through a small museum, we entered a theatrette containing a largish diorama which initially didn’t look very impressive (photos discouraged, hence none with this tip).

    As the show began, there were little ships and flashing lights to illustrate positions and gun actions, even small puffs of smoke at times. Overall it gave a clear outline of the action leading the the British victory on the Plains of Abraham. It also explained the two subsequent attacks by American revolutionaries, which were beaten back by combined British and French forces – the insurgents had expected the French would join them.

    So yes, it is worthy of a visit, though given that accepted history is fairly invariable you might be advised to choose between this and the “Odyssey” display at the Discovery Pavilion (next tip) as the differences are essentially in presentation. The Musée du Fort confines itself more to the military history.

    The Musée is open daily from 1000 to 1700 from April to October, also from 1200 to 1600 in the Christmas Holidays (whenever they are!), and from 1100 to 1600 in February and March from 1100 to 1600 from Thursdays to Sundays.

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    Musee Nationale des Beaux Arts

    by Tom_Fields Written Oct 15, 2009

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    The National Fine Arts Museum is housed inside a former prison known as the Charles Baillairge Building. Some of the old cells are still there. Additions include the neo-classical 1933 Gerard Morriset Building, designed by Wilfrid Lacroix, and the modern Grand Hall.

    It has a huge collection of Canadian art, the largest in Quebec. All told, it's over 35,000 pieces. They include Indian art, works from the colonial period, and more modern works. No photos are allowed in the galleries.

    The Grand Hall A totem pole The view from the tower The Charles Baillairge Building
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    Musee du Fort

    by Tom_Fields Written Oct 15, 2009

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    For a graphic, vivid, 3-d re-creation of the decisive battle on the Plains of Abraham, this museum is the place. It brings this great battle to life, and is the perfect place to visit before or after going to the Battlefield Park.

    It has a highly detailed three-dimensional diorama showing the movements of the British and French forces, both land and naval. There are a few weapons and other relics from the battle.

    This battle sealed the fate of New France, which became a British colony at the Treaty of Paris. Of course, once the French threat was removed from North America, the 13 colonies on the east coast no longer needed British military protection. The British soon found that they had worn out their welcome in America. The rest (if you'll pardon the cliche) is history.

    The museum of the fort Relics from the great battle Three-dimensional diorama of the battle
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  • ChuckG's Profile Photo

    Musee du Fort

    by ChuckG Written Jan 17, 2004

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    This museum located in a very old building depicts the military history of Quebec CIty through the centuries.

    Different displays and animation show the six siege that Quebec city endured.

    Also, numerous artefacts of those wars are shown.

    Old Post Office

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Maison Chevalier

    by Jim_Eliason Written May 31, 2013

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    This residence of Jean Baptiste Chevalier was built in 1752 in the lower old town. Today's its a museum, the ground floor has a multimedia presentation on Old Quebec and the upstairs has rooms furnished with period furniture.

    Maison Chevalier Maison Chevalier Maison Chevalier
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    Henry-Stuart House

    by brazwhazz Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The Henry-Stuart House owes its double name to the family for whom it was built (the Henrys, in 1849) and to its most significant occupants (Mary and Adele Stuart, two sisters who purchased the house in 1918 and owned it until Adele passed away in 1987).

    Thanks to the great care of its tenants, this country house stayed unchanged while the city was sprouting around it. The authenticity of this National Historic Site is makes it special, as it offers a unique glance into lifestyle of the affluent Stuart sisters, neither of whom ever married.

    Most of the objects on display were the property of the Stuarts, but none bears their touch more than the crowning glory of the house: the garden, which was personally attended to by Adele until her death. In fact, the guided tours of the house conclude with tea service on the balcony facing the garden, which you can visit on your own afterwards.

    Between late June and early September, the tours of the Henry-Stuart House are on the hour every day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The rest of the year, tours are only on Sundays, on the hour between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Entrance fee is $5.

    If walls could talk... Living room
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    Parc de l'Artillerie

    by Blatherwick Written Dec 25, 2005

    Artillery Park served as a functional ammunition factory until 1964. After its closure it was turned into a museum. I is surrounded by fortifications erected by the French in the 17th and 18th centuries. You can go into the officers' mess and quarters, an iron foundry, and a scale model of the city created in 1806. During the summer months theree are daily musket demonstrations.

    Parc de l'Artillerie
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  • Meatwad79's Profile Photo

    Musée du Fort

    by Meatwad79 Written Sep 14, 2005

    A 25 minute diorama and video show that describes the various battles that took place in Quebec City. Although the show may seem a little dated, it was pretty interesting and gives you a quick history of the early days of Quebec City. It's worth checking out if you are in the area and need to give your legs a rest for a couple of minutes (which was definitely the case with us).

    The first
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    Morrin Centre

    by Jim_Eliason Written May 31, 2013

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    This building is a former city prison, converted into a library by the Morrin Society, a historical preservation group. Guided tours are available for a fee or the library is available for free

    Morrin Centre Morrin Centre Morrin Centre
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