Vieux Quebec architecture & monuments, Quebec

37 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Notre dame des victoires
    Notre dame des victoires
    by GentleSpirit
  • Vieux Quebec architecture & monuments
    by lazyman_1
  • Tourist inspecting the Celtic Cross
    Tourist inspecting the Celtic Cross
    by tiabunna
  • Bwana_Brown's Profile Photo

    Quebec City's First Skyscraper

    by Bwana_Brown Updated Aug 11, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Price Building

    Along with the Chateau Frontenac, the Price Building is one of the buildings that stands out from the crowd in the Old Quebec City area within the the city walls. A legacy of a large local pulp and paper making company, the Price Brothers Company, this 17-storey building was completed in 1929 to serve as their headquarters. It was built in Art Deco-style, copying the Empire State Building in New York City and is still lavishly decorated inside with scenes from the heyday of the lumber company. The company eventually deeded this impressive structure to Quebec and, as recently as 2002-03, it's upper 16th and 17th floors served as the official residence of the Premier of Quebec. The Price Brothers Company eventually merged with another to become Abitibi-Price which, in-turn, merged with Stone Consolidated to become today's Abititbi-Consolidated, one of the largest paper companies in the world.

    Our hotel was less than a block away, so I took this photo from the sidewalk across the street from the main entrance to the building.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • tiabunna's Profile Photo

    Celtic Cross

    by tiabunna Updated May 2, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tourist inspecting the Celtic Cross
    4 more images

    As we walked from the Place d’Armes to the Arsenal, we ‘discovered’ this large Celtic cross all by ourselves – none of our guidebooks or the tour guide had mentioned it. I suspect that the date 2000 at the top indicates its recent erection and (goodness knows), maybe nobody else had noticed it before!

    It is impressive though, and the base engraved with the text in French, English and Gaelic is certainly intended to ensure the message is comprehensible. It is a ‘thank you’ message from the people of Ireland to the people of Québec, for their support and assistance during the Irish famine of the 19th century. Although I took photos, I was less thorough in recording the location, but working backward from the map and from where we were heading at the time I am fairly confident that it was in rue Charlevoix, near de la Hotel-Dieu. The photos show the text in all three languages.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • tiabunna's Profile Photo

    Admire the Price Building

    by tiabunna Updated May 2, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Price Building, Quebec

    It seemed unlikely, but smack in the old part of Québec, somebody had parked a reasonably substantial Art Deco skyscraper! That’s it you see in the photo. I guess people found the Frontenac Hotel somewhat unlikely also, when it was built – and that was only 20 or so years before this one went up.

    The Price Building was erected by a timber company of that name, with the foundation stone going in place in 1929: hardly an auspicious time to be building big! Maybe that’s part of the reason it now is owned by the Québec Government … and the Premier of Québec now resides on the top (18th) floor. I guess having what probably has to be the better views in the Province would have to rank as one of the perks of office!

    I find these Art Deco buildings quite fascinating, as the style tends to be replicated so closely from one to another. Others who enjoy them may be interested that my VT pal Pawtuxet also is somewhat taken by them and has some travelogues of photos from around the world on her HP.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    La Fontaine de Tourny

    by Jefie Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    La Fontaine de Tourny, in Quebec City

    The year 2008 marks the 400th anniversary of Quebec City and to celebrate this event, the Simons family gave the city the magnificient Fontaine de Tourny. The fountain comes from Quebec City's sister city of Bordeaux, France. It was originally created for the 1855 Paris World Expo by the renown sculptor Mathurin Moreau, and installed in Bordeaux in 1857. This imposing piece of art was brought to Quebec City in pieces to be reassembled and restored at the same time. The fountain now stands in front of the Parliament building, and it was inaugurated on July 3, 2007. The Fontaine de Tourny immediately became a very popular attraction, both with tourists and locals who come to get their picture taken in front of it. The setting is quite beautiful, especially at night when it is lit up. It is without a doubt the nicest monument in the entire city, and it's truly worth taking the time to check it out.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mim95's Profile Photo

    Place d'Armes

    by mim95 Written Nov 25, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fountain in Place d'Armes

    Place d'Armes was the most popular meeting place for military parades and public speaking events.

    You can see the gothic style fountain in the middle of the square. The monument de la Foi (monument of the truth) is above the fountain, honoring the 300th anniversary of the arrival of the Peres Recollets (Franciscan monks) in 1615.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mim95's Profile Photo

    The historic post office & the nearby monument

    by mim95 Updated Nov 25, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is Quebec's central postal office building, dated 1873. It was built by architect Pierre Gauvreau. In 1913, a false frontage with columns and a cupola were added on the side facing the river.

    The limestone building was renamed in 1984 to commemorate Louis S.-St-Laurent, Prime Minister of Canada of 1949 to 1958, which resided in Quebec. Today, it still houses a post office, with a stamp collectors counter and an exhibition hall.

    Next to the post office building on cote de la Montagne is the Monument Monseigneur de Laval, the first bishop of Quebec. It was the work of sculptor Louis-Philippe Hebert in 1908, and was made with bronze and granite.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mim95's Profile Photo

    Quebec City Hall

    by mim95 Written Nov 25, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    l'Hotel de ville de Quebec

    The l'Hotel de ville de Quebec, or the City Hall, was built in 1895, on the site of the college des Jesuites (1635). The College was the main cultural and educational center of New France.

    Guided tours are available from the main entrance of the City Hall.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mim95's Profile Photo

    Old Quebec's tallest building & Plaza des Jardins

    by mim95 Written Nov 25, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Edifice Price &  Plaza des Jardins

    Edifice Price (Price Building) is Old Quebec's first and only tall building. The 15-storey art-deco building was built in 1929 and was the headquarter of the Canadian lumber firm Price Pulp and Paper Company. It caused quite a stir from the nearby residences when it was built. As a result, the city does not allow any buildings taller than 60 meters.

    The interior features two maple-wood elevators and copper plaques showing the scenes of the company's early activities.

    In 2001, the top floors were converted into the official residence for Quebec's premier. Only the lobby is opened to the public.

    Plaza des Jardins is where you can find the monument of the first Canadian cardinal and the archbishop of Quebec, Elzear-Alexandre Taschereau. The bronze and gold statue illustrates his devotion to God and assistance to the Irish victims of typhus in 1847.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mim95's Profile Photo

    Porte Saint-Louis, one of the four remaining gates

    by mim95 Written Nov 26, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Porte Saint-Louis

    Porte Saint-Louis is one of the four remaining gates in the fortifications. The current gate was built in 1878 by Lord Dufferin, the governor of Canada at the time. It replaced the initial gate, which was too small for traffic to get through.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    The Old City Gate - Impressive

    by Mikebb Written Jun 13, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gate To Old Quebec - Early Evening
    1 more image

    You know you are entering an old city when your entry is through the gate of a walled city.

    After checking into our hotel late afternoon we could not wait to explore the walled city and a few hundred metres from our hotel was this beautiful old gate. Evening was quickly closing in and an ideal time for a photo.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    City Walls

    by Dabs Updated Apr 1, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    City walls
    4 more images

    Surrounding the old city is a 3 mile long defensive wall started by the French to protect the Upper Town from attack. In order to enter the upper town from the west, you have to go through one of the city gates that you can see in the attached photos, you can go up to the top of the gates for a look around and sort of walk a portion of it.

    On the northeast side, we walked from the Lower Town near the Marche du Vieux Port along the ramparts to get back into the center of town.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Fortifications of Québec

    by Phalaenopsis03 Updated Jun 8, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The only walled city remaining in North America, Old Québec is surrounded by an imposing 2.9 miles (4.6 km) of fortification. Originally intended as a defense system to ward off attack from the Iroquois and the British, today it's a popular site for visitors.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo

    You must walk in Vieux-Quebec!

    by jumpingnorman Written May 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Daughter chilled during Vieux-Quebec Walk, Canada

    Old Quebec,or better known in French as Vieux-Québec, is a wonderful neighborhood to walk around in! 'Old Quebec' refers to the part of the "city within the walls. " and in it are wonderful cobblestone streets, many art galleries and great architecture. We enjoyed eating at the restaurants where I even tried to practice my very anomalous French, hehehe...

    It was a bit chilly during those days in September when we brought outr twins who were 3 years old then --- but they still had a lot of fun. But I heard that during the winter, this place can really be freezing!

    But if you really want a piece of the history of Quebec, this is a must to got through. Not walking in Vieux-Quebec when in Quebec is like a diamond ring without the diamond.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    QC's most beautiful fountain...

    by King_Golo Written Nov 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The fountain

    ... is the one in front of the parliament building. Erected only some years ago, the fountain has become the no. 1 motive for tourists and their cameras... It is really beautiful and thus worth taking a picture. Make sure to come back at night when the fountain is illuminated!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    The Ramparts

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Nov 18, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Ramparts, Quebec City

    The Ramparts, or walls, surround the upper town in a three mile loop. The walls make a very interesting walk that give you a good overview of the major attractions in the city. For most of their circumference, you can walk right on the tops of the wall.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Quebec

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

75 travelers online now

Comments

View all Quebec hotels