Whitehorse Transportation

  • The plane that took us back to Vancouver
    The plane that took us back to Vancouver
    by Jefie
  • Erik Neilson International Airport in Whitehorse
    Erik Neilson International Airport in...
    by Jefie
  • Transportation
    by cobrioc

Most Recent Transportation in Whitehorse

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    Erik Neilson International Airport

    by Jefie Updated Jul 13, 2013

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    The plane that took us back to Vancouver
    1 more image

    Given how remotely located the city is, flying is by far the easiest way to reach Whitehorse - though not exactly the cheapest, unfortunately. Other than the local company Air North, the two companies offering flights to Whitehorse via Vancouver are Air Canada (two flights daily) and West Jet (one flight daily). In the summertime, Condor also offers a direct flight from Frankfurt, which is very convenient for European travelers (and which also explains the great number of German visitors in the Yukon!). The Whitehorse airport is not very big; for security reason, the airport can't handle more than 50 passengers at a time. However, passengers still have access to a small restaurant and convenience store at the terminal.

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    Trolley along the Yukon

    by PeterVancouver Updated Apr 19, 2012

    Travelling along the banks of the Yukon river can be found a quaint trolley which was originally built in Portugal in 1925. It was originally made for overhead electric supply, which is still being considered in Whitehose, but for the time being the power is produced by a 600v diesel generator which is hitched to the trolley. ( see my video on ex portuguese trolley)

    It runs from the area adjacent to the SS Klondike at Rotary Peace Park right to the other end of town near to Wal Mart with stops along the way. The current fare is C$2.00 one way or $4.00 return. It rides on the original rails of the W.P. & Y.R. line and operates between June & September

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Family Travel

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    Klondike Loop

    by cobrioc Written Jul 22, 2003

    The “Klondike Loop” refers to the 323-mile/520-km-long stretch of Yukon Highway 2 (the North Klondike Highway, also sometimes called the “Mayo Road”), from its junction with the Alaska Highway north of Whitehorse to Dawson City; the 79-mile/ From Whitehorse to Tok via the Alaska Highway is approximately 396 miles/637 km.)

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    Alaska Highway

    by cobrioc Written Jul 22, 2003

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    Alaska Highway

    Just south of Whitehorse, the South Klondike Highway connects the Alaska Highway with the port of Skagway, AK. Just north of Whitehorse, the North Klondike Highway, referred to as the "Klondike Loop", connects the Alaska Highway with Dawson City, YT. From Dawson City, the Top of the World Highway heads west to the Taylor Highway in Alaska, which branches south back to the Alaska Highway (forming the so-called "Klondike Loop"). Also branching off the Klondike Highway are the Dempster Highway to Inuvik, NWT, and the Silver Trail to Elsa-Mayo-Keno and the Campbell Highway. At Haines Junction on the Alaska Highway, the Haines Highway connects the inland highway system with the port of Haines, AK. The Alaska Highway crosses into Alaska at Port Alcan northwest of Haines Junction.

    The scenery along the Alaska Highway is spectacular. Between Fort Nelson, BC, and Watson Lake, YT, the Alaska Highway crosses the
    Alaska Highway offers beautiful views of the snowcapped peaks of the Kluane Icefield Ranges. At Boutillier Summit (elev. 3,293), northbound travelers get their first glimpse of Kluane Lake, the largest lake in Yukon Territory. After crossing into Alaska at Port Alcan, the highway offers views of first the Wrangell-St. Elias mountains, then the Alaska Range between Tok and Delta.
    Regardless of weather, the Alaska Highway is open all year.

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    Getting to Whitehorse By Land

    by cobrioc Written Jul 22, 2003

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    If you travel via the Alaska Highway, you'll be surprised by what a relaxing drive it is and by the beautiful scenery you'll encounter enroute.
    Gas is measured in litres in Canada. A litre is about a quarter of a gallon. It's not cheap.

    Distances are measured in kilometers; one kilometer is about 0.6 miles.
    Two main routes lead from British Columbia: the Alaska Highway begins at Dawson Creek and stretches for 2,233 kilometers before reaching Delta Junction, Alaska. You'll find gas, food and lodging every 32-80 kilometres.
    South Klondike Highway
    between Carcross Corner and Skagway . North Klondike Highway
    between Whitehorse and Dawson City
    The Yukon River is 2200 miles (3520 km) long, the 4th longest in the world.
    Kluane Parkway: The Kluane Parkway travels northwest from Haines Junction through Destruction Bay and Burwash Landing to Beaver Creek, Yukon and on to the US border.

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    From Canada

    by cobrioc Updated Jul 22, 2003

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    From Canada, air connections are available through Whitehorse, Yukon to Juneau and Prince Rupert,B.C.to
    Ketchikan International Airport is located on Gravina Island.
    The Ferry leaves the airport on the half hour.

    Getting to WHITEHORSE quickly can be done by land, or take a tour once you get there. Be sure to keep a close watch on the road and traffic report and allow plenty of time to take pictures as you go.
    WHITEHORSE consists of modern airport large enough accommodate the extensive tourist trade from all over the world, a busy downtown core with a large convention centre and hotels to suit every taste and budget.

    Fly to Whitehorse rent canoes or rafts, pack your gear, and get set to float down the fast-flowing Yokun River to Dawson City.

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  • Alaska highway. It will take a...

    by smiley7700 Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Alaska highway. It will take a day and a half to get to Whitehorse from Fairbanks or Dawson Creek but its a great drive. The road conditions vary from excellent to poor. Construction sites can be over 20 miles long and very rough but the southern part of the highway can easily be driven at 65-70 MPH. Traffic is light but you'll want plenty of time to get out and look around and take pictures. Food, gas and lodging are limited. The tiny towns have small restaurants with limited menus but some of the towns that actually show up on a map have slightly better restaurants and lodging. Gas isn't cheap and it may be 50+ miles away so beware.
    Car or walking. Downtown was pretty small and everything was within walking distance.

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    Many people will fly to...

    by Kindra Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Many people will fly to Whitehorse and then rent a motorhome to travel the Alaska Highway. This is very expensive.
    Take a car and drive from wherever in North America you choose and bring a tent. In the summer months this is probably the best and cheapest thing to do. Buses do circulate serving Whitehorse through to stops in the Yukon Territory and Alaska to Anchorage but they only run every other day on a fairly rigid schedule. Cars allow for easy mobility. Whitehorse has a modest bus system but nowhere else in the Yukon. 22,000 people live in Whitehorse and a few thousand more are dispersed throughout the Territory- it is not very densely populated at all!

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Whitehorse Transportation

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