Mexico City Local Customs

  • Watching the film about Trotsky and Frida Kahlo
    Watching the film about Trotsky and...
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  • Local Customs
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  • Another demonstration in Mexico City.
    Another demonstration in Mexico City.
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Most Recent Local Customs in Mexico City

  • malianrob's Profile Photo

    Drinking tequila the right way step by step...

    by malianrob Updated Sep 20, 2008

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    Drinking tequila the right way step by step instruction see pictures for demonstration..
    1st- get your tequila of choice, cut lime, and salt ready.
    2- lick your hand just slightly and sprinkle a little salt between you thumb and finger.
    3- hold your tequila shot with the other hand and with the hand that has some salt on it pick up your lime.
    4- lick the salt off your hand, suck on a little bit of lime and keep it in your mouth.
    5- take your shot of tequila and swallow.

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  • malianrob's Profile Photo

    Alot of affection

    by malianrob Written Sep 20, 2008

    One thing that I noticed and then my sister also mentioned was that the people here show so much affection to eachother. Couples holding hands hugging and kissing on the street was very common. Alot of touchy feely, not in a disrespectful way, but in a very nice very affectionate manner.
    I probably saw more affection here than at any other place I have ever visited. I was staying in the Zona Rosa neighborhood which I later found out was a high homosexual area. Nothing wrong with that But it was the same thing here.
    It didnt make us feel uncomfortable rather it made me kinda miss my honey. :)
    I guess next time I will have to bring him.

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  • Arial_27's Profile Photo

    Try the churros

    by Arial_27 Written Aug 14, 2008

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    You can buy churros in lots of places on the streets or in cafes and restaurants. They originated in Spain, but are very common in Latin America, and they're all over Mexico City. You can have chocolate, blackberry, caramel and other sauces filled into the inside of the churro too, its very good. :-)

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    Know at least some basic Spanish

    by Arial_27 Written Aug 14, 2008

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    Knowing at least a little Spanish would be very helpful when traveling through Mexico City, as a lot of people do not know much English. Here are some basic words and phrases to help you get through your trip if you don't already speak the language:

    Hola. Como estas? = Hi. How are you?
    Muy bien, gracias. Y tu? = Very good, thanks. And you?
    Por fa = Please (The correct way is "por favor" but many people just say "por fa")
    Gracias = Thank you.
    Mucho gusto = Nice to meet you.
    Donde = Where
    Porque = Why
    Que = What
    Cuanto = How much/many
    Como = How

    Me llamo... = My name is..
    Tengo... = I have...
    Quiero... = I want...
    (No) me gusta... = I (don't) like...
    Soy de... = I am from....
    (No) puedo... = I can (not)

    Los servicios = bathrooms
    Banco = bank
    Hotel = hotel
    Playa = beach
    Museo = museum

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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    Hugging

    by cinthya_in_victoria Written Apr 30, 2008

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    When living in Canada and traveling in Japan and China, I realize that in some cultures aren't used of the 'art' of hugging. For all those who haven't been in my country before, it's customary for us Mexicans geeting a friend with a hug; if somebody gives you a hug, proves that he/she is happy to see you. Let me tell you a brief story:

    At the turn of the XX century, during the Mexican Revolution, it was customary to discretly search people when meeting them, just to make sure that they were not carrying any guns that could create problems, and that was done by giving them a hug, then, as time passed by, people stopped carrying guns, but the practice stayed on and now instead of searching for guns, we try to show our affection to our friends.

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  • anagrettel's Profile Photo

    Our Holy Mother "The virgin of Guadalupe"

    by anagrettel Updated Jan 8, 2008

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    Our lady of Guadalupe

    For most Mexican (Catholics) the lady of Guadalupe is very important, even if you don't share the same religion, don't ever offend the image or her name. She is our Holy Mother, We "catholic mexicans" venerate her image and love her in a way that is probably not understood in others countries. So, be respectful.

    An about the 85% of Mexicans is of the Catholic religion, but we have all religions.

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  • anagrettel's Profile Photo

    Greeting customs

    by anagrettel Updated Jan 8, 2008

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    When I first arrive to México from USA I had to get used again to a Mexican custom I had lost, when greeting or metting someone you kiss on the cheek. A kiss in the cheek is common as a greeting between Men-women., women-women, Not men-men, Mens usually just shake hands.

    Mexicans are very "Touchy" people, we love physical contact with the people we love, like friends and family. Unlike other cultures... We are not affraid of showing affection of closeness and we kiss(on cheek), hug and touch a lot (in a good way =))

    - When You arrive to a meeting or dinner you have to take the time to go saying hello and kissing them on the cheek (or shake hand), you have to greet each person one by one, a general hello to the group is NOt enough (polite).

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    Traditional Mexican Candies

    by anagrettel Written Jan 8, 2008

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    Mexican Traditional candies

    Don't waste an opportunity to taste the Traditional mexican candies, that you can find in the streets of the city as well as well known stores, candies like; Cocada, Yemitas, Obleas, Macarron, Borrachitos, Palanquetas, Glorias, Mazapan, Banderitas and many others...

    *If you're alergic to eggs, peanut and coconut be careful when choosing one of this candies.)

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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    Independence day

    by cinthya_in_victoria Written Dec 27, 2007

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    Celebrating the

    As any other country, we celebrate our Independence day! it takes place on September 15th. If you get to visit us during that day and if you like adventure, go to Zocalo! It is REALLY crowded and you might have a flour-filled egg crashed in your head or covered with foam but it's really funny. At 11:00 our president comes out from the Palacio Nacional building with the Mexican flag to ring a bell and repeats Father Hidalgo's words when he proclamed our independence. Otherwise, to avoid that, I recommend you to go to a Mexican restaurant to watch the "grito" on TV and celebrate as a local in a very Mexican atmosphere.
    The next day, September 16, a military parade starts in the Zócalo and ends at the Paseo de la Reforma.

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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    Day of the dead

    by cinthya_in_victoria Written Dec 24, 2007

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    On November 1st and 2nd we celebrate the Day of the Dead or Dia de los Muertos. The 1st of November is also called All Saints' Day and is remembrance for the children who have died. The 2nd of November is also called All Souls' Day is remembrance for the adults that have died.
    Mexican families put an altar in their houses with the food, drinks and the stuff that the dead relative liked when alive.
    A common symbol of this day is the sugar skull (or calaverita in Spanish), which the name of any relative, dead or alive, is inscribed on its forehead. Sugar skulls are gifts that can be given to both the living and the dead. Other holiday foods include pan de muerto, a sweet egg bread made in various shapes, from plain rounds to skulls and rabbits often decorated with white frosting to look like twisted bones.

    Many activities take place in celebration of the Day of the Dead like the ones in Coyoacan or Mixquic but they may vary from town to town.

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  • Dia de Los Muertos - Honouring the dead

    by Manyana Updated Nov 30, 2007

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    religious dance

    it was my first day ever in mexico. the streets were flooding with people dressing in traditional costumes and dancing on thriving yet pleaing beats. there were many people performing the dance for their ancestors in the street. they were burning incense, crossing visitors with herbs and flowers, and reciting prayers in spanish for the sake of the Mayan god of death. people, including myself, were dancing in even rows, accurately following the loud beats of the drums, and nearly making no mistakes or missing a step out.

    when i hesitated for a bit to join the dancing crowd, an old lady approached me, said something in spanish i could barely hear or understand, and was pointing at the crowd for me to join . i dropped off my backpack, and instantly joined. a gentleman noticed my naive steps, gave me a gentle smile, pointing to follow his steps. i smiled back. seconds later, we all became one group with united dancing steps.

    that was the most religious joyful experience ever!

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  • ecclectic traditions of religion

    by Manyana Updated Nov 30, 2007

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    queuing for forgiveness

    my mexican friend told me that there are tens and tens of local languages and so the religious traditions. over 90% of the population is Roman Catholic but these are mixed with the ancient practices like of the Aztec, Mayan and Incan. Mexicans are not religious people but they can be very passionate about carrying out the traditions and observing the customs.

    in a morning, i was in a big church. i saw a long queue, waiting to see the priest and to ask for forgivness. that was very impressive to see. and this made me fancy what they'd be doing afterward in the evening.

    observing omens or signs is very common. my friend's ring broke by an accident - an omen of a memory to let go! she was given another new ring - a sign of a new relationship! and so mexicans continue to unfold the meaning behind these omens!

    definitely mexico is a legendary land that i look forward to stepping on its soil once again.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Friendly and Honest ever

    by Manyana Updated Nov 29, 2007

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    colours and faces

    mexicans are one of the sweetest people ever i've met on my travels besides the spanish and indians. they're friendly, honest, and always want you to see you happy.

    i was in a grocercy shop and was withdrawing some cash. i had my cash and forgot my credit card inside the machine.

    a bit later, a lady came all the way down to where i was sitting, and told me that i forgot my card. she just could easily take it away. that was so innocent and nice

    on many occasions, when my spanish didn't help me much, people were patient with me. when i ask about directions, i ask them to wait for me to look up the word in my spanish guide. they wait, help and smile. every single person i asked helped me with something and waited for me to use up my spanish. if i were somewhere else, i'm sure people would just make fun and go away.

    honest, i really loved mexico and the mexicans; me gusta mexicana personas,lol

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  • Viva Mexico

    by Manyana Updated Nov 19, 2007

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    symbol of ecclectic pride

    Mexicans tend to be very proud of their country and culture regardless of their different traditonal backgrounds. you'll see 'gia-normous' flags almost everywhere; in Zocalo city centre, shops, and even bookmarks!

    the flag consists of three stripes and a coat of arms in the middle (a falcon, snake and cactus). the three colours of the flag - green, white, red - can be seen as stripes on the National Palace, necklace beeds, traditional bags. it's just so vivid. the green stands for hope and the independence from spain; white purity and the catholic religion; and red for the blood shed of national martyrs.

    i find it interesting as i come from a country where you'd rarely see any flag apart from goverment offices or VIP events. it's wonderful to see friendly mexicans taking pride in being who they are! very simple and i like it.

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  • street shoe shining

    by Manyana Written Nov 17, 2007

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    street shoe-shinging

    ok, i have seen shoe shining before but as street-professional as this. usually i see a guy in a corner with a rug and a tiny piece of wood where he places the foot/shoe on to shine. but in mexico, this comes with a whole package; a seat for the shoe-shiner, a cushion for the customer, an umbrella, a box of tools, and a bike to drag the whole package, and to drive around. there are quite a few in zocalo and around. gentlemen with ties and ladies with scarves opt to take a seat at one of these shoe-shining bikes and have their shoes shone.

    perhaps i'd take one of these street shoe shining session when i'm next in mexico. that's for sure. if you don't have time to take care of yourself, it's such a quick luxury in a simple busy place.

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Mexico City Local Customs

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