Mexico City Off The Beaten Path

  • Teotihuacan
    Teotihuacan
    by MichaelFalk1969
  • Monarch Butterflies
    Monarch Butterflies
    by MichaelFalk1969
  • Valle de Bravo
    Valle de Bravo
    by MichaelFalk1969

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Mexico City

  • Aptypo's Profile Photo

    Polyforum, diamond of steel, light and color.(2)

    by Aptypo Updated Oct 7, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Polyforum Cultural Siqueiros

    Its architecture is unique: a double geometric structure, 12-sided on the outside and octagonal on the inside.
    The structure of the Polyforum suggests a diamond mounted on a steel setting.
    Viewed from any angle, this octagon looks like an ellipse, an illusion created by the original perspective conceived by Siqueiros for his interior mural.
    The exterior of the Polyforum is actually an enormous easel with 12 masterpieces on it.
    Each one consists of 160 square meters of sculpted painting and depicts symbolically a theme.

    Another of its unique characteristics is its four different interior levels, which make the utilization of space very versatile.
    First level is multi-purpose and houses the offices.
    Second level contains a circular theater which seats 600 and can be used for lectures, seminars, small concerts and other cultural events.
    Third level is called the National Forum.
    Fourth level is the Universal Forum, the walls and dome of which are completely covered by the world's largest mural ever painted, known as 'La Marcha de la Humanidad' (The March of Humanity).

    The mural covers 4331 sq meter (46,618 sq ft) of curved and sculpted wall space is a surprise, as is the richness of its form and color.
    It depicts the opening of a dome on one side and its closing at nightfall on the other. At opposite ends, two gigantic pairs of hands symbolize Man -in his desire to dominate and create- and Woman -in her search for peace and harmony.
    The second part of the mural describes the march of humanity toward the future revolution. Science and technology will be used to build a new world where peace and culture reign.

    'La Marcha de la Humanidad' was Siqueiros' last great work, he died only two years after its completion.

    Under the dome there is a rotating platform which can hold 1,000 people, thus allowing the audience to 'march' together with humanity through its history and toward the cosmos...

    Directions:
    701 Insurgentes Av., next to WTC (World Trade Center).

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  • patricia1.nunez's Profile Photo

    The Tlayudas vendors

    by patricia1.nunez Written Apr 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tlayuda is a Big tostada or crispy blue tortilla covered with salsa, fresh cheese,refried beans and nopales,,This ladies sitting everywhere thru the Zocalo are prosecute by law together with all of the illegal vendors in this city area,,, They carry big baskets with all ingredients and people gathers around them to taste some of this famous mexico city appetizers,,,That was funny to see this kid yelling to all ladies that police was comming , and how fast they were running for not be catched,,I was about to order my food when I saw all vendors picking up their stuff and get lost around the corners..However,5 min later they cameback they sat down as notthing wouldn´t happened,, and I was able to enjoy my food same as 15 people that were running behind them to buy a tlayuda... that was Hilarious... Thats Mexico City and it´s street adventures

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  • gypsysoul73's Profile Photo

    Mezcal tasting

    by gypsysoul73 Written Jan 16, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Can you see the worm?

    Where would a trip to Mexico be without some Mezcal? We were given a free lesson about the agave or maguey plant (from which mezcal and tequila are made) during our trip to Teotihuacan. It was very interesting to learn about the multiple uses of this plant such as how the natives derived paper from it's leaves as well as natural needle and thread.

    Aside from the mezcal we also got to sample different types of tequila which were all surprisingly much smoother than the spirit I am familiar with and have a very strong aversion to and which conjures terrible memories of embarassing actions and painful mistakes, not to mention hangovers. The tequila is a type of mezcal but distilled specifically from the blue agave.

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining

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  • ronaldpk's Profile Photo

    Explore the cute neighbourhoods of Mexico City

    by ronaldpk Written Mar 22, 2006

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    One of many local churches in Mexico - Moneda St
    4 more images

    One morning, I wandered along Moneda and watched the city life waking up from sleep - locals vendors setting up their kiosks, the chilly morning greeting the beams of the sun. I loved the small churches with figures of saints twisted from pain with such a horryfying expression on their faces that gave you a shrill. It was like being on a borderline between life and the other world. On my walk, I ran into small plazas with tropical trees and plants decorated with ribbons - quite a touch of exoticism for me.
    I love early mornings in warm countries - the chilliness being gradually replaced by the heat and the intensity of light that amplifies within minutes. The dawn soothes your soul and brings you back from your hybernation.

    Related to:
    • School Holidays

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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    Feria del Mole

    by cinthya_in_victoria Written Dec 26, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chicken with mole and colorful tortillas

    If you are in town during October, don't you miss the opportunity to taste one of our culinary prouds: mole!!!

    La Feria del Mole or "Mole market fest" is held in San Pedro Atocpan, located about 2 hours from downtown. It's a very big market where there are improvised restaurants, shops and it is celebrated once a year.

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  • poor hands with great smiles and rich hearts

    by Manyana Updated Dec 5, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    smile, you're in mexico

    poverty is very common in mexico. with expensive real estate and living expenses, life can be really hard for many mexicans - marking their daily routine with hardship and challenges.

    regardless of all this, the few days i've spent in mexico have shown me that poverty was never a barrier to the way of a bright smile. all the people i have talked to or bumped into, simple and sophisticated, they all had this charming smile of a rich heart full of love and generosity of spirit, putting all the hardship of their lives behind their back. they greeted me, gently spoke to me, welcomed my query, guided me to the right direction, gave me a great smile, and never asked me to pay back. i felt that i wasn't alone on this planet!

    as my mexican friend once said, 'this is us mexicans; if you are happy, we are happy'

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • chris_i79's Profile Photo

    Isla de las munecas

    by chris_i79 Written Sep 8, 2004

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    I really don't know how to explain it?

    When you are floating around Xochmilco and the canals, keep your eye out for the isla de las munecas (island of the dolls). It is a very bizzare place. I saw an episode of Lonely Planet (or Pilot Guides) on TV and they were in the same place. Very very weird and a little creepy.

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  • chris_i79's Profile Photo

    Las Prismas

    by chris_i79 Written May 17, 2004

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    About an hour from Pachuca (which is 1.5 hours North of Mexico) lies Las Prismas. A cascading waterfall surrounded by a campground and some venders. This is a popular getaway for people from Mexico City.

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  • jumanuel's Profile Photo

    Out of the way... have some fun

    by jumanuel Updated Jun 27, 2005

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    Six Flags

    Six Flags is an ok theme park!
    You will have fun, just try to arrive between 11.00 - 11.30 am, in that way your day will be just fine and will be finishing all games before rain comes.

    Batman the Ride, Escopion, Kilahuea, Medusa and Superman, most be the first one you get in, they are always full! Just get out of the routine and meet some other people in the city.

    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Family Travel

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  • Laura_Mexico's Profile Photo

    Templo de la Sagrada Familia

    by Laura_Mexico Updated Dec 27, 2011

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    The best possible view of the church outside
    4 more images

    This is a church located in one of the oldest neighborhoods in town (Colonia Roma) which is not very touristy, so most people coming to Mexico and even some of us who live here won't even know it exists unless someone takes us there.....

    My hubby took me here for the first time and I was pleasantly surprised. I personally am very fond of admiring the architecture of churches, catholic or otherwise, so this was a nice discovery for me. This church was built at the beginning of the XX century, during the Mexican Revolution, and it currently is in a very good condition. It's very popular for weddings, XV birthday ceremonies, etc. If you're a fan of visiting churches you will like this one for sure.

    The first picture was taken by myself very recently after several attempts - there are many buildings & houses around the church and it's hard to have a full view of it. The 2nd photo of the church's facade was taken by my brother... as you may see the perspective wasn't great but it was the best that could be done from right in front of the church. The photos of the inside of the church were taken in my very last visit.

    Church is located on the corner of Puebla and Orizaba streets.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Teotihuacan

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jan 22, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Teotihuacan

    Teotihuacan - about an hours drive north-east of Mexico City - is a spectacular archaeological site. This pre-columbian city ruled large parts of Central Mexico for hundreds of years before the Aztecs came, and was abandoned by its inhabitants in 650, also long before the arrival of their Aztec successors. What can be seen today are mainly religious sites, in perfect condition: the temple of god Quetzalcoatl, the majestic Sun Pyramid and the Moon Pyramid. The pyramids can be climbed and offer a great aerial view of the whole site.

    There is an excellent bus connection from Mexico City to Teotihuacan and back: take the metro to the "Norte" autobus terminal and take a bus from there. Busses to Teotihuacan leave frequently (at times every 1/2 hour!), and take only about an hour one way (the last bus from Teotihuacan leaves about 6-7 p.m.). Much cheaper than a tour would be. Take care to buy a ticket to "piramides" (some buses go only to Teotihuacan village).

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  • AnnaLupilla's Profile Photo

    Iglesia & Hospital de Jesús

    by AnnaLupilla Written Nov 9, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If I wouldn't have met Rafael one day, I never went there, that's for sure, as he took me there to pick up his cousin Adrian.
    Built on order of Hernán Cortés between 1521 and 1524, it is the only building of the 16th century in the Centro Historico. It was constructed in a place Aztecs called Huitzillan, referring to the first encounter between the emperor Moctezuma II and the Spanish conqueror on November 8, 1519 after entering Tenochtitlán. A monument on Calle Pino Suárez reminds of that event.
    Cortés died 1547 near Sevilla (Spain), but his remains were carried 1794 to this church (entrance Calle Salvador).
    In 1663 a rich indigenous woman named Petronila Jerónimo left this institution an image of Jesús Nazareno, origin of its current name.
    The hospital is not Latin America's oldest, but the only one what has worked without interruption since its foundation.
    In the upper level can be found murals by José Clemente Orozco.
    Address: Pino Suárez and El Salvador, Centro Histórico Open: Mon-Sat 7am-8pm, Sun 7am-1pm and 5-8pm. Free admission. Metro: Zócalo.

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  • cobrioc's Profile Photo

    Juarez Theater

    by cobrioc Written Mar 17, 2003

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    The stunning neoclassical Juarez Theater, with its Doric columns and bronze statues of Greek musers, stands to next to the baroque Churh of San Diego, whose standout feature is a facade of detailed, exuberant stone carvings.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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  • Laura_Mexico's Profile Photo

    Krishna festival in Mexico City

    by Laura_Mexico Written Oct 5, 2009

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    Altar with Krishna deities
    4 more images

    One of my in-law relatives joined the Krishna community in Mexico a couple of years ago, and this year she invited my man (her uncle) and me to the yearly festival they hold in Mexico City.

    In no way do I want to promote this or any other religion -- I'm just adding this tip because it was a different experience that other people, like me, may enjoy to have. The Krishna festival takes place every year in our hometown; it is my understanding that it usually takes place in May but this year it had to be postponed due to the swine flu outburst and the instruction that people should not attend crowded places, etc. So it took place in early October instead and it was pretty interesting to attend this activity since you almost felt as if you were in another country.

    They start the festival with a parade where you can see big parade floats (one or more of them holding the Krishna deities, who only come out of their temple these 2 days as they remain in the temple the rest of the time) and people dressed in a Hindu style dancing. They start on Reforma ave. and then reach Parque Mexico (in the Condesa area, Sonora & Mexico streets) where a big stage is placed to both host the deities/altar (picture 1) and where different performances take place: dancers, musicians and actors offer different shows which are pretty attractive. Pictures 2-5 show some images of the Krishna dancers I saw and which I liked very much.

    Next to the stage there's an open area where several stands are installed and where some Krishna food is served/sold (they're vegetarians so most of their food is soy-based; they also eat dairy and bread and several desserts), where you can buy genuine hindu clothes and accesories and books, and where yoga and dancing lessons are offered as well. Many people attending the festival belong to the community and therefore were dressed in a Hindu style: many women were wearing Saris and they looked really nice. The whole atmosphere made you feel as if you were not in Mexico but in India..... very interesting indeed.

    Free admittance to all of the activities and even some of the food they give away is for free; the rest of the stuff is sold but apparently the prices are decent.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Festivals

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Piedra Herrada Butterfly Reservation

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jan 13, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Monarch Butterflies

    About 3 hours west of Mexico City exists a not-so-well-known nature destination named Piedra Herrada Butterfly Reserve. The orange/black-coloured Monarch Butterflies migrate each year between Canada and Mexico (and back), spending the winter months in central Mexico until leaving for Canada in February. The Piedra Herrada Nature Reserve is dedicated to their protection. To get there, join a tour or hire a driver for a daytrip (costs about 130 - 150 $ and usually includes entrance fee, guide`s fee etc. and a trip to Valle de Bravo).

    From the visitor center, you hike (or horse-ride) about 1:30 hours up a mountain. If you walk, it will be a strenuous hike, but taking photos is much easier if you are not on a mount. At the end of the hike, the guide will point out an area where the butterflies hibernate. This has to be seen to be believed. There are literally tens of thousands of butterflies hanging from tree branches or gathering around the trunks in large clusters, not counting those already flying in the air. You can actually hear the butterflies - the simultaneous clapping of their many wings sounds like winds rushing through the trees. This is a truly awe-inspiring sight.

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Mexico City Off The Beaten Path

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