Basilica de Guadaluape, Mexico City

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  • Statue of Juan Diego
    Statue of Juan Diego
    by fachd
  • The Old Basilica
    The Old Basilica
    by fachd
  • The original miraculous cloak of Juan Diego
    The original miraculous cloak of Juan...
    by fachd
  • fachd's Profile Photo

    The New Modern Basilica

    by fachd Written Dec 18, 2013

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    The New Modern Basilica was constructed in 1974 because the Old Basilica is sinking. A major pylon that prevents the shrine from sinking in the unstable subsoil supports the new structure and it can hold up to 10,000 people inside the building.The image of Virgin Guadalupe with the original cloak was moved to the New Basilica.

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Basilica of Guadalupe

    by fachd Written Dec 17, 2013
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    After St Peter in Vatican Rome the Basilica of Guadalupe is the most visited Catholic Church and National Shrine of Mexico. It is located at the foot of Tepajec Hill in Mexico City. It is a place visited by the pilgrims from Catholic devotees from all over the world especially on December 12th.

    The Old Basilica was constructed in 1531 when Juan Diego had a vision of the Virgin Guadalupe and his original cloak remained at the Old basilica till 1974.

    As it was built on the riverbank the Old Basilica gradually sinking due to excessive weight and it was too dangerous for people to worship in the building. It was closed to public till May 2000.

    The New Basilica named Basilica of Saint Mary of Guadalupe was built between1974 and 1976. The image of Virgin Guadalupe with the original cloak was moved to the New Basilica.

    Surrounding the Basilica of Guadalupe there are beautiful gardens like Jardin del Tepejec, numbers chapels, religious statues and museums. For me it was interesting and worth the visit.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Basilica de Guadaluape

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Jan 22, 2013

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    Basilica de Guadaluape
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    This series of 7 churches is considered the holiest place in Mexico and sits on the site where in 1531 a local shepard had visions of the Virgin Mary. Since then the site is now a pilgrimage site and the Virgin of Guadaluape is credited with many miracles.

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  • malianrob's Profile Photo

    Basilica de Santa Maria de Guadalupe

    by malianrob Updated Sep 13, 2008

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    We came here after amorning in the ruines of Teotihuacan. First of all there are two Basilicas. One is the original Basilica and the other is the new one. There are also a fewother churches in the area. Even if you are not Catholic you should pay a visit to the Basilica. We parked in the down stairs garage area and then went into the shops that are located right there to purchase some religious items so that the priest can bless them. I purchased a beautiful crucifix and a rosary that smells like roses. It is interesting to know that church is everyday here starting at 6am at the last service is at 9pm. They have service almost every hour. We went to the gardens right next to the Basilica which are so beautiful and very well maintained. You can see the two waterfalls there that celebrate the union or joining of two cultures. Also if you go all the way up the hill past more gardens you will get to the exact place where the Virgen Mary appeared to Juan Diego.
    To me, it was all very fascinating. At the top of the hill there is a church which depicts the whole story of Juan Diego and the Virgen Mary on Frescos.

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  • anagrettel's Profile Photo

    La Villa de Guadalupe

    by anagrettel Updated Jan 1, 2008

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    The image of teh virgin in the rought cloth
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    The tradition of La Villa de Guadalupe (commonly known as "la Villa"), involves a miracle and an Indian saint: manifested in the apocalyptic fashion of the Virgin emblazoned in rough cloth, brought to the attention of XVI century Indians living their own end of the world, the image then fascinated Creoles, who multiplied it until it became a national phenomena in the XIX century. It was the Indian Juan Diego whose vision of Virgin Mary in 1531 started a saga of stories that aided the conversion of millions of Indians to Catholicism and became a symbol of Mexican people around the world.

    The Basílica, located in the North side of the Americas Square there is a church that used to house the image of the Virgin, from the beginning of the XVII century until 1976, when the new Basilica was built following the design of architect Pedro Ramírez Vázquez. The former building, in contrast, has the features of Pedro de Arrieta's style: Baroque forms and refined ornaments that include volcanic red stone and colored tiles on the domes and bell towers.

    Photos:
    1- the image of the virgin (from the miracle).
    2- The church that house the image of the virgin until 1976
    3- Me and my son in front of the new "Basilica de guadalupe" the church that houses the image of the virgin today.
    4- the image of the virgin (from the miracle) in the cloth over the Mexican flag.

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    La Villa (or Basilica de Guadalupe)

    by cinthya_in_victoria Written Dec 24, 2007

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    Located near of Tepeyac hill, north of Mexico City. The site is nearby the place where it is said Our Lady of Guadalupe appeared in front of Juan Diego. The Basilica is the most important religious building in Mexico. It houses the original tilma (or apron) of Juan Diego that shows the icon of Our Lady of Guadalupe. It is visited by several million people every year, especially around December 12, Our Lady of Guadalupe's Feast day.

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    La Villa

    by anagrettel Written Oct 17, 2007

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    La villa
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    La Villa de Guadalupe like many modern sanctuaries in Mexico found its origin in sacred hills and caves, however its location north of Mexico City has given it national importance.
    The tradition of La Villa de Guadalupe, as it is now known, involves a miracle and an Indian saint: manifested in the apocalyptic fashion of the Virgin emblazoned in rough cloth, brought to the attention of XVI century Indians living their own end of the world, the image then fascinated Creoles, who multiplied it until it became a national phenomena in the XIX century. It was the Indian Diego whose vision of Virgin Mary in 1531 started a saga of stories that aided the conversion of millions of Indians to Catholicism and became a symbol of Mexican people around the world.

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    Basilica de Gauadalupe

    by gypsysoul73 Written Jan 16, 2007

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    Basilica de Guadalupe
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    A circular modern church (the New Basilica) was built when the original one started to sink making it unsafe under the weight of the 10 million people who make the pilgrimage to her shrine every year. The Old Basilica is still open to the public. As you enter, you are greeted by a bronze statue of St. Juan Diego whose cloak is engraved with the famous image. Hanging from his left arm and pinned to the red board behind him are rosaries, letters, pictures and prayers of all kinds.

    It is in an unassuming hallway of the new church though where you will find hanging the cloak of Juan Diego framed in gold. It was transferred here from the high altar to allow more people to view this sacred image without obstructing the mass. As I stared at it in awe, passing it slowly on the walkalator and almost forgetting to take a picture, I felt the hair on my arms and the back of my neck stand. I felt her presence. It easy to understand how this vision has captivated both believers and non-believers alike. I felt unworthy to be in her presence and I was humbled before it.

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  • andrewyong's Profile Photo

    Basilica de Senora Nuestra de Guadalupe

    by andrewyong Written Jan 8, 2006

    Go to the basilica towards the north of the city. It is where in 1531 the Blessed Virgin Mary appeared to a humble Indian, Juan Diego Cuauhtlatoatzin on the hills of Tepayec that she wished the bishop for a church to be built in her honour. You may read more about his story on the official website www.virgendeguadalupe.org.mx or the hundreds of websites dedicated to this image of the Blessed Virgin Mary. FYI, it's the most visited pilgrimage site in the world; 20 million people (almost equal to the population of Mexico City) visit the shrine basilica every year.

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  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Basilica de Guadalupe

    by Blatherwick Written Aug 26, 2005
    Basilica de Guadalupe

    Two basilicas bear the name of Our Lady of Guadalupe. The first, begun in 1531, is now the museum of the basilica., The current one, built between 1974 and 1976, is a circular building constructed in such a way as to allow maximum visibility for the Dark Virgin.

    The story of the image of the Dark Virgin is an interesting one. Juan Diego was walking on December 12, 1531. Along the way, in the village of Guadalupe, the Virgin Mary appeared, speaking to him in his native Nahuatl language. She told him to build a church at the site, but when Juan Diego spoke to the Spanish bishop, the bishop did not believe him, asking for a miraculous sign. The Virgin told Juan Diego to gather flowers from a hill, even though it was winter, when no plants bloom. He found Spanish roses and presented these to the bishop. When the roses fell from his apron an icon of the Virgin remained imprinted on the cloth.

    The apron containing her image has been hung in the church built on the spot through the building's various versions. The picture is of a woman with olive skin, rather than the white skin of European iconography, that appealed to both indigenous Mexicans and their mestizo descendants as one of them. Similarly, Juan Diego, was a Native and not a Spaniard. The image of Our Lady of Guadalupe has been used by advocates of indigenous rights throughout Mexico's history, most recently by the Zapatista movement.

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  • Enzyme_X's Profile Photo

    Basilica De Nuestra Señora De Guadalupe

    by Enzyme_X Written Jan 9, 2005
    Antigua Basilica

    On 9th december, 1531, young indian saw a vision of Virgin Mary. When he told told the story to the priests, they didn't belive him. But that chancged when he saw her again. Since then, thousend of pilgrims came to this place to worship Virgin Mary, who became the main patron of, first Nueva España and later Mexico.
    Many pilgrims ''walk'' the last meters to the basilica on their knees.

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  • Enzyme_X's Profile Photo

    Nueva Basilica De Nuestra Señora De Guadalupe

    by Enzyme_X Written Jan 9, 2005
    Nueva Basilica

    When the old basilica became too small for all worshipers it was neccessary to build a new, bigger one. So, in the 70's this new, modern looking basilica was built right next to the old one. It can hold couple of thoussend people at once.

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  • morgane1692's Profile Photo

    Basilica of Guadaloupe

    by morgane1692 Written Feb 20, 2004

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    a sight and a site to see

    On this spot a few years ago, okay in 1531 to be precise, a Mexican Indian peasant fellow named Juan Diego, had a vision of the Virgin Mary. The local bishop wasn't so sure about this but when Juan saw the same woman again shortly thereafter, this time she instructed him to collect a bunch of roses which began growing in the rocky soil at his feet . When he dumped them out, his cloak had her image on it and that bishop changed his tune, fast. He had a church built here straight away, and the now holy cloth was hung up on a wall for the masses to see.

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  • petirrojo's Profile Photo

    Basilica of the Virgin of Guadalupe

    by petirrojo Updated Oct 9, 2003

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    Virgin de Guadalupe

    Whether or not you choose to believe the story surrounding the foundation of the church at this location (the present Basilica is the third structure on the site), you will certainly appreciate the devotion of the Mexican people to their patroness, the Virgen de Guadalupe.

    Legend has it that a simple peasant, one Juan Diego (recently canonized by the Catholic Church), received a visitation from the Blessed Virgin, only this apparition had the darker skin of the indian population. He reported the visitation to the local priest, who doubted him. Juan returned to the site and the Virgin reappeared, this time offering Juan red and white roses to bring back as proof -- it was December, when they were not in bloom. These he wrapped in his cloak and brought back to show the priest. However, when the roses tumbled out, something miraculous was seen: the image of the Virgin was imprinted in the cloak.

    That cloak is one of Mexico's holiest icons, and its home is the Basilica de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, on the northern edge of the city limits. The new Basilica isn't as impressive as its predecessor (still on the site, but listing sadly and unsafe for touring), but for the many thousands who visit each year, the draw is the sacred image.

    Viewing the image in itself is interesting. You go to an area behind the altar and down below it. From there, you step on a little moving walkway and are whisked past the icon!

    A museum is also part of the complex, situated to the rear of the older Basilica.

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  • Aptypo's Profile Photo

    La Villa, and the holy cloak. (1)

    by Aptypo Updated Oct 7, 2003

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    Bas��lica de Guadalupe

    La Villa.
    Basilica de Guadalupe.
    (Basilica of Guadalupe).

    In 1523, just two years after the Aztec capital of Tenochitlan fell to Hernán Cortés and his soldiers, the first Roman Catholic missionaries arrived to begun the religious conquest of Mexico.

    The Spanish missionaries in Mexico were having a terrible time converting the Mexican Indians to Christianity.
    Fray Bernadino de Sahagún and his fellow Franciscan brothers immediately immersed themselves in the intensive study of indigenous languages along with the history, customs and religious practices of the Mexicas, whom they called 'Aztecs'.

    Soon fluent in 'Nahuatl' language, they proceded to translate religious texts and teach the Christian doctrines.

    Curious fact: the word 'Guadalupe' is Spanish-Arabic, but in Mexico it may represent certain Aztec sound (Coatlaxopeuh).

    In 1531, in Juan Diego's vision, the Virgin Mary (in Mexico is known as Our Lady of Guadalupe) asked him to make sure a church was built in her honor at the site where the Basilica is now, and where the worship place of the important Aztec goddess Tonantzin (Mother of Earth).

    Coincidence?...

    Well, the bishop Juan de Zumárraga didn't believe Juan's vision story, but Juan was visited again by Virgin Mary, who directed him to a stony place several kilometers north of what is now Mexico City where she said he'd find roses.
    She was right. He picked the roses, wrapped them in his cloak and took them to the bishop.
    Upon unwrapping the roses, the Virgin Mary's image was imprinted in the cloak, in all her dark-skinned beauty.

    Stranger than science...

    The bishop was convinced, and he immediately proceeded to build a church on the spot.

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