Bellas Artes, Mexico City

4.5 out of 5 stars 32 Reviews

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  • Lots of People milling around
    Lots of People milling around
    by asolotraveler
  • The outer Park
    The outer Park
    by asolotraveler
  • Facade of Palacio de Bella Artes
    Facade of Palacio de Bella Artes
    by asolotraveler
  • CLillard's Profile Photo

    Ballet Folklorico - Great show, not typical ballet

    by CLillard Written May 5, 2006
    Ballet Folklorico
    4 more images

    My coworker was hesitant to go, because he thought it would be a traditional ballet. It's more of a folk show where they have different costumes, dancing, and a live band/orchestra.
    Shows are every Friday at 8:30 pm, Sunday 9:30 am, and Sunday 8:30 pm. We went to the Sunday morning show, came 15 minutes early and bought the tickets at the ticket booth. You can buy them at Ticketmaster Online http://www.ticketmaster.com.mx but I couldn't figure out the whole "will call" thing. My seats were still pretty good and I noticed there were many available seats. There isn't a dress code (for the morning show anyway), I wore jeans, a nice shirt, and sandals.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Music
    • Architecture

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Edificio Central de Correos

    by MM212 Written Feb 25, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This beautiful example of Mexican Gothic architecture is in fact the main post office. Built in 1908 by an Italian architect, this building combines elements of Venetian, Moorish and Mexican styles. The building lies in the Bellas Artes section opposite the Palacio de Bellas Artes.

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  • AnnaLupilla's Profile Photo

    Palacio de las Bellas Artes

    by AnnaLupilla Updated Nov 23, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The sculptures you can see on the facade are works by Italian artists such as Bistolfi, Fiorenzo, Boni and Marotti amongst others.
    This is the city's main stage for music, theater and dance performances as well as it is a site for art exhibits and top literary activities.
    Its construction began in 1904 under the supervision of Italian architect Adamo Boari, who based it on the eclecticism of the time (a sum of styles), in which art nouveau from late 19th century stands out as well as a notorious Byzantine influence. Revolutionary movement of 1910 and technical difficulties due to swampy subsoil - perceptible to this day in the slow sinking of the building - interrupted its construction until it was completed in 1934 by architect Federico Marsical. A student of Baori, he modified the project and made the interior spaces in art deco style, dominant in those days.
    Currently, it houses the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes.

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  • jumanuel's Profile Photo

    Bellas Artes

    by jumanuel Updated Sep 15, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bellas Artes

    Bellas Artes represents the boom of the "Porfiriato". Díaz wanted to built a city as close as posible to a Parisinian scene, however it didn't happen. You can see many of this influence in the structure.

    Bellas Artes is a place where you can enojoy of some nice concerts and cultural plays. The best time to visit it is when a synphonic play or ophera. Also if you are intested in mexican muralist paintors you will find some paints inside the building.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • sanguin's Profile Photo

    Mexican Muralists

    by sanguin Written Jul 3, 2005

    Diego Rivera is the more famous, but another excellent and fascinating muralist is David Alfaro Siquieros, who tried to kill Tolstoi when he was in Mexico with Diego Rivera. His works can also be found in the Palacio de las Bellas Artes, together with paintings of Rivera and José Clemente Orozco. They're breathtaking!

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    • Arts and Culture

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  • Aptypo's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bellas Artes, the Art Noveau palace.

    by Aptypo Updated Oct 7, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palacio de Bellas Artes

    Palacio de Bellas Artes.
    (Fine Arts Palace).

    A colossal construction ordered by the President Porfirio Díaz in 1904, according to imitate the European tendences, and was finished 30 years later.

    Laying of foundation and metallic structure (steel) made by 'Milleken Bros.', from New York, and tons of heavy imported Carrara white-marble and mexican marble.
    So heavy it is sinking faster than the sinking city!

    Teatro Nacional (National Theatre) was the original name of the work of Italian architect Adamo Boari Dandini in 1904.
    The building was eventually halted by financial problems after Mexican Revolution in 1916 and was finished by the mexican architect Federico Mariscal in 1934 with some modifications and a new name: Palacio de Bellas Artes (Fine Arts Palace).

    The building is renowned for its architecture, is just a grandiose Art Nouveau palace with nationalistic decorative elements inside and exterior sculptures by Bistolfy, Boni, Fionensi and Marotti.
    Theatre, museum, library, offices and art exhibitions including marble and bronze sculptures, stunning murals and paintings by several celebrated Mexican artists such Tamayo, Rivera, Orozco and Siqueiros.

    Inside are a beatiful 'Tiffany' stained-glass curtain made in New York, maybe inspired on draw by mexican artist 'Dr. Atl' depicting a scene of the volcanoes outside Mexico City.

    Today is also home of the world-famous 'Ballet Folcklórico de México', wich brings a spectacular performance.

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  • Ronald_T's Profile Photo

    Palace of Fine Arts...

    by Ronald_T Updated Jul 14, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Palace of Fine Arts...

    The Palace of Fine Arts was build between 1904 and 1934. This building, maybe one of the most symbolical of Mexico City after the Cathedral is a excellent example of the Art Deco style. If you visit, do not miss the Folkloric Ballet of Mexico, a creation of Amalia Hernández. For more info and pictures, see my “Palace of Fine Arts travelogue” please…

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  • Laura_Mexico's Profile Photo

    Bellas Artes

    by Laura_Mexico Updated May 23, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bellas Artes Palace

    Only a few blocks away from the Zocalo (central square) area - where the Palacio Nacional and the Cathedral are located - we have the French style Palacio de las Bellas Artes (Fine Arts Palace), right next to the Latinoamericana Tower (one of the highest buildings in town and where you can have a panoramic view of the city, that is, when the day is not too polluted, and this doesn't happen very often unfortunately) and the Alameda Central, a big park. Many museums around here too. Make sure to pay a short visit to the Azulejos building, just beside Fine Arts Palace, which hosts a very popular store & restaurant here in Mexico (Sanborns) but which main attraction is the architecture and the decoration (both inside and outside), not the store located inside. Just go in to give a look and you'll like it very much cause it's very Mexican.

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    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    palacio de bellas artes,mind stairs direction....

    by cbeaujean Written Oct 23, 2002
    bellas artes sinking

    during its construction (1904-1934!),they realized the building was sinking in the very light and unstable ground(as if it was butter!)
    today,it goes on sinking:its unique quality!
    since its achievement,has lost 4 meters...
    so,the same stairs which went up before,today are going down....

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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bellas Artes

    by filipdebont Updated Oct 13, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palacio de Bellas Artes

    This Jugendstil-Palacio is build in 1904, it is built in Carrara marble. The interior is in Art-Deco. It is in fact concert hall but also an arts center. On the second and third floor you can see beautiful paintings. There is no entry fee to visit the first floor, the bookstore, souvenir shop and the restaurant are on that same floor. In the evening, you can see here a show of typical Mexican music and dancing. The entry was quite expensive (12US$ - 29US$).

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  • ciberamigo's Profile Photo

    The Palace of Fine Arts

    by ciberamigo Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Main fa��ade
    1 more image

    Started to be the National Theater, it was meant to be the top-of-the-art modernist (art-nouveau) structure; it was completed 30 years later as a top-of-the-art Decó structure in its interior, while its exterior fulfilled the original art-nouveau objective. It houses an art museum, the opera house, and several small concert chambers, theaters, and galleries.

    Related to:
    • Theater Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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  • obcbreeze's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bellas Artes

    by obcbreeze Written Dec 19, 2010
    Palacio de Bellas Artes
    1 more image

    Unfortunately we weren't able to catch a concert here, but we were able to tour the lobby and grounds which were beautiful.

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  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    One of the symbols of the city.

    by el_ruso Written Feb 27, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You really can't miss it. It stands at the beginning of the Alameda. The concert hall has Diego Rivera's murals inside.

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  • deadites's Profile Photo

    Palacio des Belles Artes

    by deadites Updated Feb 9, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bellas Artes

    If you can, try and catch the Ballet Folklorico of Mexico. Ancient traditions and history of Mexico are brought to life through dance! A must see!

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  • jenn_d's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bella Artes

    by jenn_d Written Jan 22, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Magnificent Marble

    A theatre and concert hall with murals that adorn the second floor.

    There is a tourist information stand at the front desk

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