Bellas Artes, Mexico City

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  • Lots of People milling around
    Lots of People milling around
    by asolotraveler
  • The outer Park
    The outer Park
    by asolotraveler
  • Facade of Palacio de Bella Artes
    Facade of Palacio de Bella Artes
    by asolotraveler
  • jumanuel's Profile Photo

    Bellas Artes

    by jumanuel Updated Sep 15, 2005

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    Bellas Artes

    Bellas Artes represents the boom of the "Porfiriato". Díaz wanted to built a city as close as posible to a Parisinian scene, however it didn't happen. You can see many of this influence in the structure.

    Bellas Artes is a place where you can enojoy of some nice concerts and cultural plays. The best time to visit it is when a synphonic play or ophera. Also if you are intested in mexican muralist paintors you will find some paints inside the building.

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  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo

    Elegant Tiffany glass at Bellas Artes, MX City!

    by jumpingnorman Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bellas Artes in Mexico City

    I never even heard of the Palacio de Bellas Artes before I came into Mexico City during an 8- hour layover. But I chanced upon this building as I was walking the streets – it is a beautiful white building with a great façade with lots of people taking pictures outside.

    I decided to go in and was not disappointed. The interior was likewise great and there was a gift shop/bookstore which sold miniatures or representations of what can be seen inside. The palace has an Art Noveau Tiffany glass curtain made up of a million colorful pieces, created by a famous Mexican landscape painter, Doctor Atl) who depicted volcanoes of Mexico. There are also great murals by Mexican painters Orozco, Rivera, Siquieros, Tamayo and Montenegro (beautiful names).

    The whole Palacio itself was constructed in 1904, on grounds where the Santa Isabel convent used to be. The architect was an Italian, Adamo Boari, but there were problems with the ground stability and then the revolution broke out….so it took years and another architect, Federico Mariscal, to complete the Palacio in 1934.

    Certainly a great Palace to visit when in Mexico City!

    Free guided visits to the main theater to see the stained glass curtain are offered from Tuesday to Friday at 1 and 1:30 pm

    PALACIO DE BELLAS ARTES

    Avenida Juárez y Eje Lázaro Cárdenas
    Mexico City 06050 Mexico
    difusion@museobellasartes.artte.com
    Open Hours10:30a-6:30p Tu-Su

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    Palacio de las Bellas Artes

    by acemj Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Palacio de las Bellas Artes (Palace of Fine Arts) building is one of the most impressive in Mexico City. It is the architectural achievement of an Italian, Adamo Boari and was designed in the distinctive Art Nouveau style in 1901. The grounds in front of it are impressive and its easy to reach on foot if you're staying in the historic center or by Metro (the Bellas Artes stop is literally underneath the building). The white marble was brought in from Italy and the building took over 30 years to complete finally opening in 1934. You can enter the main level for free and get an idea of the architecture, however its worth visiting the 2nd level (first floor here in Mexico) which houses the Museo del Palacio de las Bellas Artes and which contains amazing murals by Rufino Tamayo. On the next level up, you'll find the National Architecture Museum, although I didn't make it up that far.

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  • anagrettel's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bellas Artes

    by anagrettel Updated Dec 31, 2007

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    Palacio de bellas Artes
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    The city's main art center "Palacio de Bellas Artes" (Fine Arts Palace) is the heart of the art in the city, a place for best music concerts, Theater, Dance and art exhibits. The exterior built in Italian marble and style. The interior has and art deco style. You can find the events calendar in the website (is in spanish)

    For a better view and pictures of "Palacio de Bellas Artes" you can go across the street inside the store "Sears" (photo 4 & 5), the building of sears has a Terrace "The Coffe Factory" at the 8th floor, you can go to just take pictures or sit and have a coffe enjoying the view. (Be patient, service is very slow)

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  • AnnaLupilla's Profile Photo

    Palacio de las Bellas Artes

    by AnnaLupilla Updated Nov 23, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The sculptures you can see on the facade are works by Italian artists such as Bistolfi, Fiorenzo, Boni and Marotti amongst others.
    This is the city's main stage for music, theater and dance performances as well as it is a site for art exhibits and top literary activities.
    Its construction began in 1904 under the supervision of Italian architect Adamo Boari, who based it on the eclecticism of the time (a sum of styles), in which art nouveau from late 19th century stands out as well as a notorious Byzantine influence. Revolutionary movement of 1910 and technical difficulties due to swampy subsoil - perceptible to this day in the slow sinking of the building - interrupted its construction until it was completed in 1934 by architect Federico Marsical. A student of Baori, he modified the project and made the interior spaces in art deco style, dominant in those days.
    Currently, it houses the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes.

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bellas Artes.

    by cachaseiro Written Jan 22, 2010

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    Palacio de Bellas Artes.

    Palacio de Bellas Artes is the mexican opera house and also the home of many classical concerts aswell as some very varied art.
    The construction of the place was started in 1904 but due to the mexican civil war it was not completed until 1934.
    People like Luciano Pavarotti, Maria Callas and Kiri Te Kanava has performed in the palace and it was also used to host Frida Kalhos funeral in 1954.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Palace of Fine Arts

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jan 4, 2012

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    Palace of Fine Arts
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    The Palace of Fine Arts (Palacio de Bells Artes) is located on the west side of the historic center of Mexico City next to the Alameda Central park.
    The initial design and construction was undertaken by Italian architect Adamo Boari in 1904, but complications arising from the soft subsoil and the political problem both before and during the Mexican Revolution, hindered then stopped construction completely by 1913. Construction was completed in 1934. The exterior of the building is primarily Neoclassical and Art Nouveau and the interior is primarily Art Deco.

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  • Laura_Mexico's Profile Photo

    Bellas Artes

    by Laura_Mexico Updated May 23, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bellas Artes Palace

    Only a few blocks away from the Zocalo (central square) area - where the Palacio Nacional and the Cathedral are located - we have the French style Palacio de las Bellas Artes (Fine Arts Palace), right next to the Latinoamericana Tower (one of the highest buildings in town and where you can have a panoramic view of the city, that is, when the day is not too polluted, and this doesn't happen very often unfortunately) and the Alameda Central, a big park. Many museums around here too. Make sure to pay a short visit to the Azulejos building, just beside Fine Arts Palace, which hosts a very popular store & restaurant here in Mexico (Sanborns) but which main attraction is the architecture and the decoration (both inside and outside), not the store located inside. Just go in to give a look and you'll like it very much cause it's very Mexican.

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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bellas Artes

    by cinthya_in_victoria Written Dec 24, 2007

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    This place is the premier opera house of Mexico City. The building is famous for both its extravagant art nouveau exterior in imported Italian white marble and its murals by Diego Rivera, Rufino Tamayo, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and José Clemente Orozco. The theatre is used for classical music, opera and dance, notably the Baile Folklórico.

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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bellas Artes

    by filipdebont Updated Oct 13, 2002

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    Palacio de Bellas Artes

    This Jugendstil-Palacio is build in 1904, it is built in Carrara marble. The interior is in Art-Deco. It is in fact concert hall but also an arts center. On the second and third floor you can see beautiful paintings. There is no entry fee to visit the first floor, the bookstore, souvenir shop and the restaurant are on that same floor. In the evening, you can see here a show of typical Mexican music and dancing. The entry was quite expensive (12US$ - 29US$).

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Edificio Central de Correos

    by MM212 Written Feb 25, 2006

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    This beautiful example of Mexican Gothic architecture is in fact the main post office. Built in 1908 by an Italian architect, this building combines elements of Venetian, Moorish and Mexican styles. The building lies in the Bellas Artes section opposite the Palacio de Bellas Artes.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Belle Artes

    by Jim_Eliason Written Dec 21, 2006

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    Palacio de Belle Artes
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    This performance hall was built in 1905 by the dictator Porfirio Diaz. It features galleries with Murals painted by many of the great muralist of the day, including one of Diego Riveria's most famous works "Man at the Crossroads" which was orginally designed for the Rockefeller center in New York. It was rejected there due to it's communist theme.

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  • pencho15's Profile Photo

    The Fine Arts Palace

    by pencho15 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Fine arts palace
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    This is a must see in Mexico City, one of the most important places built in the city during the 20th century the fine arts palace was created to replace the "city theatre" demolished some years earlier, the italian architect Adamo Boari took care of the project and the building began in 1904 beside the central alameda, in a place where the Santa Clara convent had been.
    The building was suspended due to the mexican revolution and it wasn`t until 1934 when it was concluded by the mexican Fernando Mariscal, on 1994 the gardens in front of the palace were added according to Boari`s project.
    The palace facade is covered with sculptures made by european artists including Boari, Bistolfi, Fiorenzo, Maroti, Querol, Honore Marquest and Allar. The interior of the palace is art-deco and there are murals painted by the mexicans Rivera, Clemente Orozco, Siqueiros, Tamayo, Montenegro, Rodríguez Lozano and González Camarena. There is also a curtain of crystal made in New York with more than a million pieces showing a view of Mexico Valley.
    The palace was oficially inaugurated in 1974.
    Appart from all the great cultural events celebrated inside the palace (including the Ballet Folkclórico) you can also visit the architecture museum, some of the temporal exhibitions or take a guided tour inside the palace (it must be previously agended by phone). There is also a bookstore and a cafeteria.
    It is very hard to apreciatte the architecture from the floor, if you want to get a better view cross the street and get into a department store called Sears, on the eight floor you`ll find a cofee shop and from that place you will get an awesome view of the palace, otherwise a view like this would only be possible in pictures, so it is quite nice to see it from up there.

    Recently the palace has been restored, the result has been quite discussed since apparently it destroyed the acoustic of the place and it hide many art decó architectural elements, a complaint was gonna be send to UNESCO and ICOMOS so they could study the restoration and demand the repair of possible damages. I have not been there since it reopened so I hope the things I've read are exagerated.

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  • marcelatimmins's Profile Photo

    Mexican Center of the Arts: Bellas Artes

    by marcelatimmins Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Wonderful arquitecture, an icon for mexico city, chilangos our very proud of it. And it's wonderful going to an event there. Inside a glass courtain receives you at the stage. Don't forget to look around.
    Besides, there's always to see in the 1st. and 2nd floor galleries. Admire some of Siqueiros art (mexican well known muralist)
    Take a coffee while you see Mexico go by.

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  • malianrob's Profile Photo

    Palacio De Bellas Artes

    by malianrob Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This place is just beautiful and it is huge. We came here to get tickets to see the famous Ballet Folklorico. It was a last minute thing and I was absolutley disappointed that it wasnt playing here on this day. In side the Bellas Artes there was construction going on so they cancelled the show at this location. They told us that it will be playing at the Theatro Hidalgo so we walked over there. The Theatro Hidalgo was totally closed off too. So needless to say we didnt see the Famous Ballet. Remind me to put that on my list for next time!
    Back to Bellas Artes: Construction began here in 1904 and the inside is "completely 1930's Art Deco" while the outside is early 20th century Art Nouveau. This place is beautiful, classy, elegant yet very inviting.
    There is a theatre here and a museum. There is also murals from Diego Rivera located here too.

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