Bellas Artes, Mexico City

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  • The outer Park
    The outer Park
    by asolotraveler
  • Facade of Palacio de Bella Artes
    Facade of Palacio de Bella Artes
    by asolotraveler
  • Hula Hoop anyone?
    Hula Hoop anyone?
    by asolotraveler
  • the origin of inspirational arts

    by Manyana Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palace of Fine Arts

    my friend has told me many times about this place - a must visit and it was.

    it's located in the heart of the city, right next to the huge Almeda Park and a few minutes away from Zocalo, the city centre. Usually full of people, and always there is something going on. this places hosts the most prestigious exhibits and shows probably in whole mexico, from ballet and operas to art galleries. when i went down there on my second night in the country; there were like three big shows running and kind of sold out as well.

    i don't care much about the history of buildings but this places has seduced me with its extravagant architecture, entrance, and the fancy yet friendly atmosphere it has got.

    so if you want to see the best of luxurious mexico, do pay this place a visit

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  • ciberamigo's Profile Photo

    The Palace of Fine Arts

    by ciberamigo Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Main fa��ade
    1 more image

    Started to be the National Theater, it was meant to be the top-of-the-art modernist (art-nouveau) structure; it was completed 30 years later as a top-of-the-art Decó structure in its interior, while its exterior fulfilled the original art-nouveau objective. It houses an art museum, the opera house, and several small concert chambers, theaters, and galleries.

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  • Ronald_T's Profile Photo

    Palace of Fine Arts...

    by Ronald_T Updated Jul 14, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Palace of Fine Arts...

    The Palace of Fine Arts was build between 1904 and 1934. This building, maybe one of the most symbolical of Mexico City after the Cathedral is a excellent example of the Art Deco style. If you visit, do not miss the Folkloric Ballet of Mexico, a creation of Amalia Hernández. For more info and pictures, see my “Palace of Fine Arts travelogue” please…

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  • Aptypo's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bellas Artes, the Art Noveau palace.

    by Aptypo Updated Oct 7, 2003

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    Palacio de Bellas Artes

    Palacio de Bellas Artes.
    (Fine Arts Palace).

    A colossal construction ordered by the President Porfirio Díaz in 1904, according to imitate the European tendences, and was finished 30 years later.

    Laying of foundation and metallic structure (steel) made by 'Milleken Bros.', from New York, and tons of heavy imported Carrara white-marble and mexican marble.
    So heavy it is sinking faster than the sinking city!

    Teatro Nacional (National Theatre) was the original name of the work of Italian architect Adamo Boari Dandini in 1904.
    The building was eventually halted by financial problems after Mexican Revolution in 1916 and was finished by the mexican architect Federico Mariscal in 1934 with some modifications and a new name: Palacio de Bellas Artes (Fine Arts Palace).

    The building is renowned for its architecture, is just a grandiose Art Nouveau palace with nationalistic decorative elements inside and exterior sculptures by Bistolfy, Boni, Fionensi and Marotti.
    Theatre, museum, library, offices and art exhibitions including marble and bronze sculptures, stunning murals and paintings by several celebrated Mexican artists such Tamayo, Rivera, Orozco and Siqueiros.

    Inside are a beatiful 'Tiffany' stained-glass curtain made in New York, maybe inspired on draw by mexican artist 'Dr. Atl' depicting a scene of the volcanoes outside Mexico City.

    Today is also home of the world-famous 'Ballet Folcklórico de México', wich brings a spectacular performance.

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bellas Artes

    by draguza Written Feb 12, 2012
    The Palace

    Construction of the Palace of Fine Arts started in 1904 and ended in 1932. Technical difficulties, budgetary constraints and the 1910 Mexican revolution interrupted what was supposed to be a four year project.

    It is a magnificent white marble building used for world-class performing arts shows such as symphonic orchestras, operas, plays, singers and performers. It is undoubtedly the most prestigious performing arts center in all of Mexico.

    In addition, the building is also a museum with a steady stream of shows of Mexican and European painters. The interior walls have murals by Jose Clemente Orozco as well as stunning bronce sculptures and stained glass windows.

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  • asolotraveler's Profile Photo

    Busy, Busy Place to People Watch

    by asolotraveler Updated Dec 31, 2013
    Facade of Palacio de Bella Artes
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    I think that you learn alot just by sitting and watching people. I happen to be at the Palcio de Bella Artes and before I went into the building, I just plopped down on the steps with my bottle of water and just watch people come and go. I did notice that there were a whole boat-load of people just standing around looking. After a while I got the feeling that this was a "meeting" place. I noticed a man for quite some time just standing and looking. I watched for about 30 minutes and then a woman approached him and they went off together. Others were doing the same. A lot of young people were also meeting and just hanging around. There were big ledges that people cound sit on and listen to the Music Vendors who were entertaining us all. There were kids who where doing dances, another was entertaining us with his skill with the Hula Hoop. I must have stayed about an hour and then walked into the building to have a look-see.

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  • Ballet Folklorico at Bellas Artes

    by k10anne Written Jan 2, 2008

    A really good Sunday morning activity is to go to see the Mexican Folkloric Dancing at Bellas Artes. It's a beautiful theatre and a great way to see the history of Mexico and the difference between the regions. The dancing and the music is just amazing!

    Afterward, the Casa de Azulejos (House of Tiles), where the Sanborns department store and restaurants are, is only a short walk away. There are two restaurants, one is a lunch counter, which has good food and is inexpensive. The other is the nicer sit down restaurant that is a great place for brunch.

    For those of you who like candy, head over to the department store. My favorite candy is from the department store candy counter at Sanborns. They are called Palitos de Canela (Little Cinammon Sticks). It is still my favorite candy today, my aunt just brought me some for Christmas. They are short sticks of cinammon flavored hard candy covered in chocolate. They also have them in Peppermint flavor. It's a simple way to finish the morning.

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  • chenglinlee's Profile Photo

    Museo Bellas Artes

    by chenglinlee Written Jan 28, 2007
    museo bellas artes
    1 more image

    From the hostel behind the Zocalo Cathedral, I walked a couple blocks until I reached the Museo Bellas Artes to see some works by Diego Rivera. The guides there were so nice that one of them gave me a book on the paintings inside the museum. The next time I go back to Mexico City I am going to personally thank the guide if she remembers me and return the book to her. Please no flash inside the museum.

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  • CLillard's Profile Photo

    Ballet Folklorico - Great show, not typical ballet

    by CLillard Written May 5, 2006
    Ballet Folklorico
    4 more images

    My coworker was hesitant to go, because he thought it would be a traditional ballet. It's more of a folk show where they have different costumes, dancing, and a live band/orchestra.
    Shows are every Friday at 8:30 pm, Sunday 9:30 am, and Sunday 8:30 pm. We went to the Sunday morning show, came 15 minutes early and bought the tickets at the ticket booth. You can buy them at Ticketmaster Online http://www.ticketmaster.com.mx but I couldn't figure out the whole "will call" thing. My seats were still pretty good and I noticed there were many available seats. There isn't a dress code (for the morning show anyway), I wore jeans, a nice shirt, and sandals.

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    Mexican Muralists

    by sanguin Written Jul 3, 2005

    Diego Rivera is the more famous, but another excellent and fascinating muralist is David Alfaro Siquieros, who tried to kill Tolstoi when he was in Mexico with Diego Rivera. His works can also be found in the Palacio de las Bellas Artes, together with paintings of Rivera and José Clemente Orozco. They're breathtaking!

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  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    palacio de bellas artes,mind stairs direction....

    by cbeaujean Written Oct 23, 2002
    bellas artes sinking

    during its construction (1904-1934!),they realized the building was sinking in the very light and unstable ground(as if it was butter!)
    today,it goes on sinking:its unique quality!
    since its achievement,has lost 4 meters...
    so,the same stairs which went up before,today are going down....

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  • jenn_d's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bella Artes

    by jenn_d Written Jan 22, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Magnificent Marble

    A theatre and concert hall with murals that adorn the second floor.

    There is a tourist information stand at the front desk

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  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    One of the symbols of the city.

    by el_ruso Written Feb 27, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You really can't miss it. It stands at the beginning of the Alameda. The concert hall has Diego Rivera's murals inside.

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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Bellas Artes seen from The Torre L-A

    by filipdebont Updated Oct 6, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Palacio de Bellas Artes

    The Palacio de Bellas Artes seen from the Torre Latinoamericana. What a beautiful building this is, as from above you can see the magnificent roof construction..

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  • deadites's Profile Photo

    Palacio des Belles Artes

    by deadites Updated Feb 9, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bellas Artes

    If you can, try and catch the Ballet Folklorico of Mexico. Ancient traditions and history of Mexico are brought to life through dance! A must see!

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