Catedral Metropolitana, Mexico City

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    Catedral
    by MichaelFalk1969
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    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
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    Metropolitan Cathedral
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  • jumanuel's Profile Photo

    Cathedral

    by jumanuel Updated Mar 15, 2006

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    This antique churche is located on Zocalo, It was constructed when the sanish conquestor destroyed the old aztec religous temples, in order to change their religous Gods, to just one - Catholic Church God.
    Inside the Churche you will find the rich structure and the really fanatism for religion.

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Cathedral

    by acemj Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    The Metropolitan Cathedral is the largest church in Latin America and is worth a visit, although I've seen many more spectacular interiors than this one. The Altar de los Reyes behind the main altar is worth a look as is La Sacristia Mayor, which has a nominal charge to visit. I did enjoy seeing people actively using the church as a place of worship and prayer as opposed to many churches I've visited in Europe that have simply become museums.

    The cathedral dates to 1573 and has undergone many facelifts over the year implementing different architectural styles. The soft ground in the area has also forced a lot of preservation work to be done just to save the church from collapsing into its loose foundation.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Metropolitan Cathedral

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jan 4, 2012

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    Metropolitan Cathedral
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    The Metropolitan Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary of Mexico City (Catedral Metropolitana de la Asunción de María) is the largest and oldest cathedral in the Americas. It is situated atop the former Aztec sacred precinct near the Templo Mayor on the northern side of the Plaza de la Constitución in downtown.
    The cathedral was built in sections from 1573 to 1813 around the original church that was constructed soon after the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán, drawing inspiration from Gothic cathedrals in Spain.
    The cathedral has four facades which contain portals flanked with columns and statues.

    You can watch my 3 min 25 sec HD Video Mexico City Metropolitan out of my Youtube channel.

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  • Maria_75's Profile Photo

    The cathedral

    by Maria_75 Updated Nov 25, 2004

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    The cathedral

    The aztecs capitol was called Tenochtitlán and was situated in the middle of what today is Mexico City. In the heart of the capitol the aztecs had a sacred place called Templo Mayor with buildings, pyramids, temples, patios and gardens. After the spanish conquered the city, they tore down most of it and built their own buildings instead.

    The aztecs were used as slaves by the spanish, and they were the ones who had to do all of the work. The spanish ordered them to take apart their own buildings and use the stones to build the new churches and houses for the spanish.

    The stones used in the cathedral comes from the buildings in Templo Mayor. The cathedral was influenced by the new styles in Europe, but the aztecs also added a bit of personal style, so the cathedral has a very interesting facade.

    The building started in 1572, and the last addition was finished in 1813 when they added a balustrade and made the cupola bigger.

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  • anagrettel's Profile Photo

    Metropolitan Cathedral

    by anagrettel Written Oct 17, 2007

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    Cathedral
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    Once that the Spanish Conquers destroy the Aztec temples, Hernán Cortez order the construction of Catholic Church at the same spot. The cathedral was built with the stones of the destroyed Aztec temples.

    It was constructed in the Spanish Baroque style of architecture and hold 18 bells.It has a side chapel, the Sagrario Metropolitano (1749-69), is the greatest triumph of the Mexican Churrigueresque style. The new cathedral was consecrated in 1667, but the final elements — bell towers and central dome designed by the Spanish neoclassical architect Manuel Tolsá — were finished in 1813.

    The soft clay subsoil beneath Mexico City, which was originally built on a lake bed, has caused the sinking of many of the buildings in Mexico City's historic centre. Underground tunnels to stabilize the cathedral have prevented its collapse and have stabilized the uneven inclination of its sinking.

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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Cathedral Metropolitana

    by filipdebont Updated Oct 20, 2002

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    Cathedral Metropolitana

    El Cathedral Metropolitana: This is in fact the biggest church of Latin-America. The cathedral is damaged by subsidence, in fact the whole city is build on the soft ground of the Lake of Texoco.
    This is a magnificent buildings, The Spanish used bricks and walls from the Aztec temples and pyramids which were located next to the Cathedral (now Temple Mayor).
    On the right of the Cathedral, there is the Sagrario Metropolitana, a small parish church, with a beautiful front.
    The interior of the Cathedral is also very beautiful. Especially the Altar de los Reyes is certainly a “must see”.

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  • AnnaLupilla's Profile Photo

    Catedral & Sagrario Metropolitanos

    by AnnaLupilla Updated Nov 9, 2005

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    Claudio de Arciniega initiated the project of the Catedral Metropolitana. Its contrsuction took 240 years to complete (from 1573 to 1813); but one could also say that it actually took 270 years, taking into consideration that its design was made in 1544. As a consequence of this, the building is a mixture of gothic-renaissaince, baroque, and neoclassical features. Ata a glance, its facade seems to place it among Herreran buildings.
    The Cathedral holds uncountable artistic treasures. Altar de los Reyes and Altar del Perdón are masterworks of the Mexican baroque style created by Gerónimo de Balbás, and are restorations of the originals that were destroyed in a fire in 1967. In the case of the Main Altar, the neoclassical baldaching that crowns it was modified by the architect Lorenzo de la Hidalga. It replaced the original baroque altar created by Balbás.
    The Sagrario was built from 1749 to 1768. Its churrigueresque facade is a contrast with the interior, where Moorish forms predominate.
    This is attributed to the influence of Spanish-Muslim architecture on the designer f this building: Lorenzo Rodríguez, who was an architect from Spanish Granada.
    The Virgen de la Assunción is the patron the church, which is seat of the archbishopric of Mexico.
    You can explore the church in about 90 minutes.

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  • Laura_Mexico's Profile Photo

    Inside the Cathedral

    by Laura_Mexico Updated Aug 3, 2009

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    Within the Cathedral
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    Our cathedral started being built in 1573 and 250 years passed before it was finished -- this is why the construction has different styles mixed. Templo Mayor is just a few steps away from it, and this is where the spaniards took a lot of material to build the cathedral with (!). Within the church you will find 16 chapels and 21 altars (the main one in the front is all golden). Also, its organ is gorgeous!!!

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Catedral Metropolitana

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jan 23, 2014

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    Catedral

    The Catedral Metropolitana - the largest church in Latin America - is located on Zocalo Square (hard to miss). It was built over a period of 300 years, starting with the spanish "conquista" and finishing 1813 - only a few years before Mexico gained independence. The long building time shows in the different architectural styles that were applied when building separate areas of the Catedral, thus combining renaissance, barock and classizist elements.

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  • deadites's Profile Photo

    Catedral Metropolitana

    by deadites Updated Feb 9, 2004

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    Catedral Metropolitana

    This is a truly beautiful cathedral that took 240 years to build (1573-1813). It has undergone many changes over the centuries.

    The immense building has 14 chapels and 5 naves. You can take pictures inside but with no flash only so make sure you use a high ISO film for this treasure.

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  • malianrob's Profile Photo

    Catedral Metropolitana/The Cathedral

    by malianrob Updated Sep 21, 2008

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    One thing I love doing is visiting churches. Its too bad that they dont make them like this any more. First of all admission is free and you can take as many pictures as you like. In Peru and in Ecuador they didnt allow pictures and they charged admission to enter so this was nice.
    The Catedral and the Palacio National dominate the Zocalo and you have to check it out.
    The Catedral was constucted in 1567 and finished in1788. The altar is impressive made with gold leaf and there is a huge Organ thats near the middle of the Cathedral. There are 14 chapels within the Cathedral also.
    Right next to the Cathedral is the Sagrario, which was built in the 1700's.
    Although ad,ission is free and you can take all the pictures youd like, remember to be respectful because people do come here to worship.
    And even if you are not religious you still might want to come visit the Catedral and admire its architecture, art, and history.

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  • ciberamigo's Profile Photo

    The Cathedral

    by ciberamigo Updated May 23, 2006

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    Begun in XVIth century it took almost 250 years to complete. It summarizes the colonial's architectural history: Its plan reflects its renaissance beginnings, the nave and 4 aisles (two of them chappel bay-aisles)show the baroque development, and the dome´s lantern and balaustrades evidence its neoclassic completion. The choir has monumental organs.

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  • Aptypo's Profile Photo

    Catedral Metropolitana, the sinking shrine.

    by Aptypo Updated Nov 8, 2003

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    Catedral Metropolitana

    La Catedral.
    Catedral Metropolitana.
    (Metropolitan Cathedral).

    Having destroyed the imponent Aztec temples here, Hernán Cortés (the conqueror) order the construction of a Catholic church on the same spot.
    The original church was demolished around 1573 and Spaniards build the new Cathedral with stones from destroyed Aztec buildings, intended to look alike its equivalents in Spain.
    It was consecrated in 1667, but the final elements -bell towers and central dome- designed by Manuel Tolsá were finished in 1813.

    Catedral Metropolitana has a baroque and neoclassical facade, five separate naves, side chapels, a monumental organ, religious sculptures and many other sacred stuff.

    The soft clay subsoil beneath Mexico City, on continuous movement over the times, has propitiated the irregular sinking of many buildings, including the cathedral.
    The restoration works, not visible at this time (underground!), have prevented the collapse of the biggest Catholic church in Latin America!

    There are religious ceremonies and rituals, performed according to the Catholic faith. Don´t miss the tour at bell towers and roof. Enjoy an amazing view from here.

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  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Catedral Metropolitana

    by Blatherwick Written Aug 26, 2005
    Catedral Metropolitana

    Dominating the north end of the Zocalo is the Metropolitan Cathedral. This massive religious building was primarily constructed using the stones of the Aztec temples that stood here before it. The cathedral started construction in 1573 and finished in 1788. It blends three styles of architecture including baroque, neoclassic, and Mexican. The building has sunk into the soft lake bottom beneath and permanent scaffolding is in place to stabilize the building.

    The building today has 5 naves and 14 chapels. Some of the outstanding features in the cathedral include the tomb of Agustín Iturbide, placed here in 1838, a painting attributed to the Spanish artist Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, and the fact that the stone holy-water fonts ring like metal when tapped with a coin.

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  • Daniel_Williams's Profile Photo

    Catedral Metropolitana

    by Daniel_Williams Written Apr 3, 2005
    Catedral Metropolitana

    The Zocalo had an intensity the likes of which I've rarely experienced. Stands crowded close to each other, selling tacos, jewelry, cloth, juices, elotes; the crowd intimidated me a bit on first sight. I instantly was struck though by the beauty and age of the Sagrario and the Catedral Metropolitana. I migrated slowly toward the cathedral and was somewhat glad to escape the chaos of the market into the more tranquil meditative confines of the cathedral. Pace by pace, I was blown away by the ornate gold beauty of each Capilla, many built in the 1600s, with inlaid portraits or porcelain-seeming baby angels or saints in bas relief, and in one case, the reliquary of bones of long-dead saints. I happened to step in during a mass; the spreading of the incense, the blue or red cassocks of the priests, the ritual movements of all involved... amidst such beauty was kind of mesmerizing to observe.

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