Fun things to do in Mexico City

  • National Museum of Anthropology
    National Museum of Anthropology
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Mexico City

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    Hospital de Jesús Nazareno

    by jorgejuansanchez Updated Feb 1, 2015

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    This hospital, called Jesus Nazareno, by a church of the same name, was founded by Hernán Cortés from 1521 to 1524, in the same place where he met for the first time Moctezuma, and is the oldest in the whole of America working permanently. It is beautiful inside, on the walls of the first floor there are murals by the Mexican artist José Clemente Orozco, and a bust of Hernán Cortés.
    Hernán Cortés built the hospital, not for the Spanish soldiers, but for the sons of the Aztecs soldiers who died during the conquest of Tenochtitlan.Besides the hospital there is a church sheltering the grave of Hernán Cortés with his last remains. Cortes always felt Mexican and was his wish to be buried in Mexico, a country that he deeply loved.I paid 150 Pesos and a doctor saw me during half an hour and gave me medicines because I felt weak after several months travelling in bad conditions (sleeping in beaches, taking buses during 24 hours from Tijuana to Culiacan, eating bad food on the road, such as oysters not fresh, etc.). The reason why I went to that hospital especially was to see it well inside, so I considered the 150 Pesos (about 10 US Dollars) as an entrance fee, as if it was a museum, which is fact it was, and even much better and historic and old.
    But I did not buy the medicines prerscripted, since the next day I already felt healthy, strong, and could thus, fly to Barcelona, in my dear country, Spain.

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    Drink pulque in Garibaldi Square

    by jorgejuansanchez Written Jun 19, 2014

    In Plaza de Garibaldi there are several places where Pulque is served, and at good price.
    In the sign you can read that Pulque has been drunk by the Mexicans as from the XI century and was the favourite drink of the Azteca Emperors.
    I drank Pulque in this cafeteria, a glass, sitting down in the terrace.

    Drink Pulque !
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    My favourite Mexico City restaurants

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jan 21, 2014

    I admit that this tip belongs in the restaurant section, but I am too lazy to create a tip on every single restaurant, so just a short summary on the most worthwhile restaurants of the historical centre of Mexico City:

    - my favourite was the Cafe Tacuba, a restaurant in a former monastery building. The dining area has historical paintings, beautiful tilework and stained-glass windows, very reasonable prices and often live music
    - Cafe Popular has probaly the best quality-price ratio - unbelievably cheap but excellent food in a casual diner-athmosphere
    - Bar de la Opera has a very beautiful interior and food to match it
    - Girasola is a more pricey option with a very thoughtful menu including specialties from different regions of Mexico and Mexican-European cross-over experiments; they even have pre-kolumbian dishes on the menu
    - on the first and second level of the Casa de Azulejos is another recommendable restaurant - the drawback is that it is quite crowded and loud, but they have quality food and despite the location not expensive

    As a rule of thump, two guests can expect to pay between 250 and 600 pesos for a meal including starter/main dish + drinks altogether.

    Cafe Tacuba

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    The Artesian Market of De La Ciudadela

    by asolotraveler Updated Dec 31, 2013

    After the busy streets of the "Old" city with the multiple "Street Vendors" you are ready for another type of shopping where you are in the presence of those who actually make the items they are selling. I thought that maybe I would go to the "Famous" flower Market of "Mercado Jamaica but decided that I really did not want to see a bunch of flowers though the images of the place was awesome. I wanted to see more. It was suggested by "Craig" of the REd Tree house Inn, that I would really like the huge of Mercado Ciududella on Belderas. I asked instructions on how to get there by bus and was told that I would have to take two buses which I shook my head indicating, no way. Lucky for me there was a cab right outside the gate and I asked the driver how much it would cost. He quoted me 130. pesos and I said yes. We made arrangements and off we went. I asked him if he would come back in about 4 and a half hours and he agreed. we agreed upon the place where we would meet which was right across the street from the large grocery store of "OXOX". Same price. This was a very plesant surprise. I was not sure of how large the place was, but it is massive. The layout is pretty easy to figure out and I was surprise that I did not get lost which with indoor marketplaces like the ones in Jerusalem or Istanbul, I did. This is a open-air, coverved market with doors to the outside sidewalks. I turned left and started down one isle and then up another, crisscrossing when something caught my eye. The Folk Art, handicrafts, art and Souvenirs were just mind-bogglisng and so very colorful. It was going to be hard for me to make choices. I could see why some people buy another suitcase to for the items they have purchased. The products on sale were just amazing. Sure there was the typical “kitsch” type item that I saw in Mexico City in the Zacola Square, but they also had some very nice ceramic pieces, leather purses, loads of embroidery from pillows to blouses and dresses. I was fascinated with the little woman who was dressed in "Red" , sitting on the ground with her loom, weaving a very beautiful piece of cloth. I stodd watcing her for a long time and then I asked her if I could take her picture, she nodded yes. By the way, if you do want to take a picture of someone, go ahead and ask permission. Oftentimes there are reasons that they don't want their picture taken and I respect that. The prices were pretty good just a tad higher than the street vendors but not much and yu can aolways bargain down if you are led to especially if you are buying multiples of an items. I watched this lady load up on these little zippered, embroidered purses with a long cord. I had to have one though I purchased mine in the "Zocalo" Squre which was about 65 pesos. What I enjoyed most was that no one pressured me to buy anything. They were kind an asked if they could help and then left you alone to browse to your hearts content. They were willing to bargain a bit. I made a pass-through to see what was there and then rested a few minues then back around more slowly. I really like the Mexican pottery and the embroidery and just couldn't decide what I wanted. If you can make it to this Market, please do.

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    Beautiful Place to See

    by asolotraveler Written Dec 27, 2013

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    I really like the very spacious garden Square surrounding the Bella Artes. I could sit there for hours and people watch. What was really nice in the park-like settings, are the huge fountains that pour forth water that the kids come and jump into with all of their clothes on. I did visit the Bella Artes and it was nice inside.

    Palacio de Bella Artes Palacio de Bella Artes Palacio de Bella Artes Palacio de Bella Artes Playing in the Fountains
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    Statue of Jose San Martin

    by fachd Written Dec 17, 2013

    Jose San Martin, he was the Argentine general who successfully struggles for independence from Spain. The statue was donated by Argentinian government located at the intersection of Paseo de la Reforma and Eje Norte near Metro Garibaldi.

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    Cuauhtemoc Monument

    by fachd Written Dec 16, 2013

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    Cuauhtemoc Monument, well sorry I can only shot back of his a.rse from moving bus, nevertheless he is proud looking king dressed in a plumed robe clutching a spear ready to throw to the Spanish invaders Hernan Cortez.

    Cuauhtemoc (1495-1525) was the last of the Aztec rulers who rose to power when the Spanish conquistador invaded the city.

    The Cuauhtemoc Monument is to personify the Aztec Empire and a symbol of foreign intervention.

    The monument and is located at the largest Mexico City Avenue - Avenida Insurgentes.

    Cuauhtemoc Monument
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    Controversial Diana the Roman Goddess

    by fachd Written Dec 15, 2013

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    The controversial statue and fountain of Diana the Roman Goddess was erected in 1942.

    For the controversial story:
    http://articles.baltimoresun.com/1992-04-09/news/1992100076_1_diana-huntress-controversial-statue

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    La Fuente de la Diana Cazadora

    by AlbuqRay Updated Jun 24, 2012

    Fountain of Diana the Huntress is located on the Paseo de la Reforma between the Ninos Heroes Monument (near Chapultepec Castle) and El Angel. This was a beautiful walk in 1964 but one-way, shared taxi rides on the Reforma were just two pesos per person in those days (I think I am remembering correctly). The shared taxi drivers would cruise up and down the Reforma with their arm out the window. Their fingers would show the number of passengers that they could take.

    La Fuente de la Diana Cazadora
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  • Mexican Food !!

    by CocodriloM Written May 29, 2012

    One of the best you can do is get into the MERCADOS, old traditional Markets and try as much as u can eat. The variety of food in this places is fully Mexican cuisine, could be good or super good !!! its not expensive as going around restaurants with disappointing results. Enjoy !!!

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  • Explore Condesa

    by Jetgirly Written Feb 25, 2012

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    Condesa has always been one of my favorite neighbourhoods in Mexico City. Besides being chic and trendy, I absolutely love all of the amazing art deco architecture along the neighbourhood's shady, tree-lined streets. While you're in the area take a scenic walk through Parque Mexico (which was once the race track on a countess' private hacienda), maybe stop for tamales at the nearby Flor de Lis restaurant, shop at some of the eclectic, independent boutiques, and imagine the city as it was sixty years ago, when this neighbourhood was home to cinema stars and other celebrities.

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  • Ascend a Monumental Monument

    by Jetgirly Written Feb 25, 2012

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    The Monument of the Mexican Revolution is a monolithic structure located in Plaza de la Republica, between Insurgentes and la Reforma. It commemorates the Mexican Revolution and has recently undergone a restoration, with increased efforts to maintain the beauty of the plaza and attract visitors. Today, visitors can ride a glass elevator to the top of the monument, where they can take in views of the surrounding neighbourhood, view a sculpture gallery, visit the gift shop and stop at a cafe. A museum about the revoluation is housed underneath the monument.

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    Statue of Juan Pablo II

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 6, 2012

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    The Statue of Juan Pablo II stands near side entrance to the Metropolitan Cathedral. The statue with over imposed image of the Virgin of Guadalupe was made entirely with keys donated by Mexicans. The plaque states that this was done to show that the Mexican people had given the Pope the "key to their hearts".
    The sculpture is by Artist Francisco Cárdenas Martínez, the base on the bottom right reads "Pancho Cárdenas" ("Pancho" is a term of endearment for the name "Francisco", similar to "Bob" for a "Robert").

    You can watch my 10 min 51 sec HD Video Mexico City around part 7 out of my Youtube channel.

    Statue of Juan Pablo II Statue of Juan Pablo II Statue of Juan Pablo II
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    Jardin Botanico in Palacio Nacional

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jan 5, 2012

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    The Palace has fourteen courtyards but only a few of these, such as the Grand Courtyard beyond the central portal, are open to the public. You will see a splendid botanical garden with a great collection of cactuses.
    The National Palace also houses the main State Archives.
    On north annex of the building is the Treasury Room and the Benito Juárez Museum. A statue of Benito Juárez was placed in the north wing near his old quarters.

    You can watch my photo of Mexico City on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 19° 25' 57.87" N 99° 7' 51.41" W or on my Google Earth Panoramio Jardin Botanico de Palacio Nacional 1.

    Jardin Botanico in Palacio Nacional

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    Wallpainting by Diego Rivera

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jan 5, 2012

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    The balustrade of the palace has been remodeled, conserving the murals by Diego Rivera that adorn the main stairwell and the walls of the second floor.
    In the stairwell is a mural depicting the history of Mexico from 1521 to 1930 and covers an area of 450 m2. These murals were painted between 1929 and 1935, jointly titled "The Epic of the Mexican People". The work is divided like a triptych with each being somewhat autonomous. The right-hand wall contains murals depicting pre-Hispanic Mexico and centers around the life of the Aztec god Quetzalcoatl.

    In the middle and largest panel, the Conquest is depicted with its ugliness, such as rape and torture, as well as priests defending the rights of the indigenous people. The battle for independence occupies the uppermost part of this panel in the arch. The American and French invasions are represented below this, as well as the Reform period and the Revolution.

    The left-hand panel is dedicated to early and mid-20th century, criticizing the status quo and depicting a Marxist kind of utopia.

    Diego also painted 11 panels on the middle floor, such as the "Tianguis of Tlatelolco" (tianguis means "market"), and the "Arrival of Hernán Cortés in Veracruz".

    Wallpainting by Diego Rivera
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