Fun things to do in Mexico City

  • National Museum of Anthropology
    National Museum of Anthropology
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  • Museo de Antropologia
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  • Museo de Antropologia
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Mexico City

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    Medieval and classic art from Europe and Mexico

    by patricia1.nunez Updated Apr 14, 2009

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    Museo de San Carlos:History says this palace was a gift from Maria de Pinillos to her son autonamed Conde de Buenavista..Certanly was a big place to live, but know has been converted into a museum , very different from the rest in Mex city, as it houses mostly spanish art, medieval art and some after-conquist paintings, painted by the first criollos(spaniards born in Mexico). some art was brought from Europe as well some other was donated by private collectors, Paintings are a tour thru decades from medieval art to impresionism...also behind the premises there is a little garden with benches surround by art deco medium class houses within Col. Tabacalera..if you can walk around this area will be nice and quite.. enjoy it

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    Sit by a Half-circle Monuement in Mexico City!

    by jumpingnorman Updated Jan 31, 2009

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    You can’t miss this semi-circle marble monument beside the Alameda Park (the south side) in Mexico City.

    It is called the Hemiciclo a Juarez (literally, the half-circle for Juarez – the man depicted on top of the structure with an angel placing a laurel crown on his head while he holds the book of the Constitution of 1857).

    This semicircle work of art was built in 1905, designed by Guillermo de Heredia and engineered by Ignacio Leon de la Barra. Italians Lazzaroni and Zoccagno were responsible for the sculptures and the details – a touch of Italy in the middle of Mexico City!

    There are also two female forms symbolizing Justice and Glory on the monument. Every September 18th, the President holds a parade for this place --- although on that day when I went in the first week of September, there already a parade (could be a “practice session before the major big one!). Sept 18 is also when the park was inaugurated in 1910 by then President Diaz.

    Hemiciclo a Juarez, Mexico City
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    See Fountains and Statues in Alameda, MX City

    by jumpingnorman Updated Jan 30, 2009

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    I was walking near the Palacio Bellas Artes and you can’t miss this nice green park (the size of two large city blocks) in Mexico City, The Alameda Park.

    Apparently, this is the first park in the city, all the way from the 16th century. Fountains, statues dedicated to famous Europeans like Beethoven, and families with young kids fill up the park, specially on that Sunday I was there when there was a parade of the streets.

    The exact location of this park in the middle of the historical district is where an Aztec marketplace used to be. And during the Conquest, the Catholic Church apparently was involved in the burnings of heretics and witches on these very grounds!

    But in 1592, Luis de Vasco decided to build a park on this spot, taking the name of the “poplar tree” seen in the area called the “Alamo” --- Hence. ALAMEDA!

    Alameda park fountain in heart of Mexico City
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    Tlaloc Statue

    by pencho15 Updated Oct 15, 2008

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    This statue is placed outside the anthropology museum, in the middle of a fountain.
    It was found in Teotihuacán in 1860, 142 meters away from the moon pyramid, to the west of this building, it is believed that it used to be at the top of the pyramid when the city was inhabited. It had a jade heart in it's chest wich was stolen a long time ago (when the statue was found the heart had already dissapeared)
    The statue was brought to Mexico City in a very dry season, but when it get here a unusually strong storm began, it rained during all the travel of the statue trought the city, the storm stopped when the statue was placed on it`s current location.
    It never rained again for several months, of course it was said the storm was caused by the god of the rain.
    It is probable that this statue does not represent tlaloc, ibstead it could be the goddes of the water, Chalchiuhtlicue

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    Our gorgeous Cathedral

    by Laura_Mexico Updated Sep 29, 2008

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    This is our Cathedral, in the heart of the town.... An interesting (and sad) info you might like to know about it is that it's sinking because of the irregular soil it is built on. Mexico City was settled where a lake used to be a few centuries ago, and therefore some of our buildings are sinking because the ground isn't firm.... sad, isn't it? :-( The Bellas Artes Palace has the same problem...

    However, the Cathedral has been reinforced and refurbished and it looks really beautiful now, both in & outside... A very complicate and impressive underground work was done here to prevent the Cathedral from sinking yet more and it looks like they did a good job in repairing this great building which took 300 years to be built (and was finished about 2 centuries ago). The refurbishment works took about 10 years to be finished...

    NEW!!! Now you can climb up the towers of the Cathedral and walk on the roof top... the view of the city isn't very good (but you may get lucky and see a bit of it on a clear day) but it's a cool experience. It costs $12 Mexican Pesos to go up (a bit more than a US Dollar) and they don't have fixed schedules to take people upstairs (a guide must take the whole group to make the tour), they rather wait to have a group of 6-8 people and then they let you go up.

    Mexico City Cathedral
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    Fountains/Monuments in the streets of Mexico City

    by malianrob Updated Sep 23, 2008

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    Besides the "Angel" which is a very impressive monument there are others throughout the city. There is also alot of sreet art. I took alot of pictures in Mexico City because there was just so much here! I dont know the names to all the monuments and fountains and the art but they are beautiful.

    Monumento a Cuauhtemoc Fuente de la Diana Cazadora Fuente de la Cibeles

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    The miracle cloak

    by malianrob Updated Sep 23, 2008

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    The cloak that Juan Diego wore hangs in the new basilica behind bullet proof glass. As you enter the Basilica and look in, you can see the cloak in front of you along with the big Mexican flag. What you dont see is that as you walk toward it and go off to the side you go down alittle and the is a walk way that goes back and forrth so that you can view the cloak up close.
    You can take pictures and there is no cost for admission.

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    Do some side trips to other niegborhoods

    by malianrob Written Sep 22, 2008

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    We took a day and went to Coyoacan. This was high on my list of things to do because I wanted to see the Frida Kahlo Museum. But we did a few thingsalong the way. We hired a driver,established a price with him and did alotof things. He picked us up at our hotel and we headed out to Coyoacan. Along the way we went to the Plaza De Toros, Estadio Azteca, Coyoacan and Xochimilco. We saw the Frida Kahlo Museum, The Diego Rivera Museum,The Dolores Olmedo Museum. We hung out in Coyoacan,checked out their market, their downtown, their City Hall. In Xocimilco we had a late lunch, Went to the floating gardens, Shopped alittle and took tons and tons of pictures!
    It was a full day and we were exhausted when we came back to our hotel but it was so worth it.

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    Torre Latinoamerica

    by Arial_27 Written Aug 14, 2008

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    Awesome experience - its cheap, and one of the best ways to get a great view of the city. It will cost you about $4 USD to ride up. The tower is an important landmark in Mexico City, and stands 182 metres high including the antenna. Carlos Slim, a Mexican who is currently the richest man in the world, owns most of the companies that have office space in this tower. It is also right down town, and easy to find.

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  • Argentine Tango in Mexico City

    by keizai Written Jun 19, 2008

    Greetings,

    I am currently visiting Mexico City, and I am happy to say that the tango scene here is alive and well. The best place to connect with the Tango community is at the outdoor Sunday Milonga held at the Parque de Mexico in the Condesa district. (Closest subway Chilpancingo). The event is free and starts at 5:00 PM.There is a free lesson from 5:00 to 5:45.

    From there you will meet all sorts of absolutely wonderful people who will be happy to tell you about all of the Milongas and teachers in the city (and even escort you to the Milonga that happens after that Milonga)

    Happy dancing!

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  • Send Your Mail in Style

    by Jetgirly Written Jun 7, 2008

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    If my tip entitled "Sit on a Bench" was right up your alley, I guarantee you will enjoy a trip to the post office in Mexico City. Like the super-cool benches that line Reforma, the post office at the corner of Tacuba and Lazaro Cardenas is not your average, run-of-the-mill post office. Rather, it is an absolutely beautiful space filled with carved wood and gold accents. It was designed by Adamo Boari (who is also responsible for the Palacio des Bellas Artes) in 1908, and is still actively used today. Here, you can buy postcards (from the worlds most limited selection), buy stamps, mail letters and ride a very cool elevator. There are some museums on the first and fourth floors, but they're super boring. Anyone can enter the post office for free, but you may be asked to show ID. Seriously- don't miss this place! It's cool!

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  • Go Back and Forth in Time

    by Jetgirly Updated Jun 7, 2008

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    Plaza de las Tres Culturas (Plaza of Three Cultures) is located north of the city center, not too far from the Basilica de Guadalupe. Entrance to the site is free, and hours are usually from 9:00 am to 7:00 pm. The three cultures represented on the site are Aztec, Spanish-Colonial and modern. The Aztec ruins of Tlatelolco dominate the site, and include remnants of pyramid-shaped temples built one atop another. A simple church was built on the site in 1609, and the whole place is surrounded by monolithic 1960s housing complexes named after significant dates in Mexican history. On October 2, 1968 nearly a quarter of a million students protested Mexican social and educational policies at this plaza, and after the government sent in tanks and troops the student death toll was calculated at anywhere between thirty and five hundred people.

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  • Go to a Church (...or Twenty)

    by Jetgirly Updated Jun 7, 2008

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    The Basilica de Nuestra Senora de Guadalupe is the most important religious site in Mexico. Seeped in history, today it is home to a cloak on which the image of the virgin "mysteriously appeared" (guide's words, not mine) and a whole collection of churches that can surely fulfill all of your salvation (and photographic) needs. The church that actually houses the cloak is a huge, modern building constructed in 1976. On the lower level, moving sidewalks whisk you past the cloak from below as services go on above. There are a variety of other churches and chapels on the site, and on a clear day the view from the church at the top of the hill is fantastic. The grounds of the site are landscaped beautifully, and off to one side and ground level there is a cool market full of souvenirs and food.

    My recent visit to the Basilica happened to coincide with the "graduation" ceremony for new priests. The new basilica was absolutely packed with people waving flags and the normal ban on balloons seemed to have been lifted for the occasion. First the young priests came out as their friends and families cheered, then the cardinal came out, blessed the crowd and gave a speech. My mom found it moving; I found it interesting. Either way, we all agreed we were lukcy to have seen the event.

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  • See Free Murals (North of the Zocalo)

    by Jetgirly Written Jun 5, 2008

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    If you didn't get your fill of free Rivera murals at Palacio Nacional, get thee to the Secretaria de Educacion Publica (SEP), located a few blocks north of the Zocalo. Open 9:00 to 5:00 weekdays and with shorter hours on weekends, SEP is home to All You Can See Rivera Murals. Truly, nary a space is left unpainted. Three floors of the building are basically covered in his paintings, with different themes on each floor. I personally liked the top floor best, where the paintings celebrate the Mexican Revolution and feature lots of pictures of fat gringos stuffing themselves while armed Mexicans look on, secretling plotting against them. In the courtyard, be sure to check out the cool sculptures in each of the corners (visible from the upper floors) that show different cultures from around the world (not sculpted by Rivera). Seeing every last mural takes a lot of time and can strain your neck, so either make two trips or be prepared to glance at most of the murals while just stopping to take in the ones that you find most intriguing.

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    Mexico City Tours

    by gomexico Written May 2, 2008

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    Advance booking isn't needed, that I'll agree. Grayline Tours operates some very popular half-day and day trips that friends of mine have complimented. If you don't speak Spanish and want to get around efficiently and have a guide or someone explain to you what you're seeing - a tour can be an excellent option. Don't forget the Turibus option in Mexico City, there are a couple of routes which for about the peso-equivalent of US$11 will take you through the city to see the highlights and you can hop on/off at these stops all day long; it's an excellent way to see the city and identify things you want to return to see on your own.

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