Museo de Antropologia, Mexico City

5 out of 5 stars 30 Reviews

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  • Museo de Antropologia
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • National Museum of Anthropology
    National Museum of Anthropology
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Museo de Antropologia
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Museum of Anthropology

    by elgarbo Written Sep 18, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Out the front of the museum.

    The museum is a good place to start your time in Mexico, offering a background on the indigenous peoples of the country, their histories and displaying a massive collection of artifacts.

    There are LOTS of things to see, but unless you have a very keen interest in clay pots, the highlights are without a doubt the Aztec calendar, the massive native head-dress and the gigantic Olmec heads.

    A good way to kill a few hours. We were there on a school day so we had to contend with lots of good natured Mexican school kids, who seemed to take a greater interest in us than the artifacts on display. We happily posed with them for a couple of photos and had a great day out.

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    Museo Nacional de Antropología

    by Blatherwick Updated Aug 26, 2005
    Aztec Calendar Stone

    Mexico is home to many of the greatest cultures in the Americas. The Toltecs, Aztecs, Mayans, and many others were building grand cities at the time of the Roman Empire. All of this comes together at the National Museum of Anthropology. It is regarded as one of the top museums in the world and gives you quick insight into the culture of Mexico. Entrance to the museum costs 38 pesos in 2005.

    Inside the museum is an open courtyard containing a fountain designed by Chávez Morado. Rooms go around three sides on with two levels. The most popular level are the ground-floor rooms as they are devoted to pre-Hispanic Mexico and the archaeological sites. Each room represents a different culture in Mexico. These rooms include dioramas of Mexico City when the Spaniards arrived, reproductions of part of a pyramid at Teotihuacán, and a full sized reproduction of the King Pakal tomb discovered in Palenque. The Aztec calendar stone occupies a proud place in Sala Mexica.

    Upstairs is devoted to the way people throughout Mexico live today. It is comprised of straw-covered huts, recordings of songs and dances, crafts, clothing, and lifelike models of village activities.

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    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    Museo Nacional De Antropologia

    by Enzyme_X Written Jul 9, 2005
    Aztec calendar.

    Now, this is what I call a good museum. Interesting and wll organised. This museum is dedicated to the history of Mexico and people who lived on this teritory in the past.
    When you enter the museum, you come to inner court from where you go to differnet rooms, each one hosting exhibition of a differnet period in Mexicos histoty. Starting on left you travel from prehistorical times, through great indian civilizations lke Mayan and Aztec to modern Mexico.

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    Museo de Antropología

    by Mexgirl Written Aug 20, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museo de Antropologia e Historia

    The Antropología museum is one of the greatests museums in Mexico city. It has several rooms, starting from the beginnings of the Prehispanic cultures and following with the Maya and Aztec cultures.

    If you are really willing to discover more about these great cultures, visiting the whole museum could take around 3-4 hours

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    Anthropology Museum

    by Matravel Written May 6, 2004

    The National Museum of Anthropology is a MUST.
    Wear your snikers and stroll all the museum. It's renovation kept closed a lot of rooms, but they're finally open!
    Don't miss the exhibiitons on the second floor. They include exhibitions on modern indigenous groups that inhabit Mexico. My niece (7yrs) loved it and actually learned a lot about these cultures that (unbelievably) are not included in basic education programs.
    Outside the Museum, just before entering, the Voladores de Papantla are a delightful spectacle.
    Be aware that many pieces might be on loan, and some exhibits might be under renovation.
    The Aztec exhibit is missing many pieces. And the Oaxaca, Mayas de las monta?as y Mayas de la planicie y la selva, exhibits were still closed when I visited this February 2004.
    The Museum offers Guided tours Tue-Sat from 9:30 to 17:30 hrs, in spanish, english and french.

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    Museo de Antropología, simply impressive. (2)

    by Aptypo Updated Oct 7, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tl��loc

    The ticket office, and the entrance to the museum proper, is by the huge glass doors to the right.

    You can buy tickets here, too, for the regular guided tours free in Spanish, or for a fee in English, French or German.
    They're very rushed, but do get you round the whole thing with some form of explanation: labelling inside is rather hit-and-miss, and often in Spanish only.
    Instead of a real guide, you can also rent an English audio guides to carry around with you.

    Every hall has at least one outstanding feature, but if you have limited time, the Aztec and the Maya rooms are the highlights: what else you see should depend on what area of the country you plan to head on to.
    The first floor is given over to the ethnography collections devoted to the life and culture of the various indigenous groups today: stairs lead up from each side.
    Downstairs, behind the hall devoted to the cultures of the north and west, is a very welcome restaurant.

    The full tour of the 23 rooms museum starts on the right-hand side with three introductory rooms explaining what anthropology is, the nature of and relationship between the chief Mesoamerican cultures, and the region's pre-history. Skip or skim them if you're in a hurry.
    They're followed on the right-hand side by halls devoted to the pre-Classic, Teotihuacan and Toltec cultures.
    At the far end is the vast Mexica (Aztec) room, followed around the left wing by Oaxaca (Mixtec and Zapotec), Gulf of Mexico (Olmec), Maya and the cultures of the north and west.

    If you have time to see only one museum in Mexico City, this is the one to choose!

    Don't miss it!

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  • Aptypo's Profile Photo

    Museo de Antropología, simply impressive. (1)

    by Aptypo Updated Oct 7, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museo Nacional de Antropolog��a e Historia

    Museo de Antropología.
    Museo Nacional de Antropología e Historia.
    (National Museum of Anthropology and History).

    Designed in 1963 by Pedro Ramírez Vázquez, helped by Ricardo de Robina, Jorge Campuzano and Rafael Mijares, its architecture alone is magnificent in an area of 79,700 square metre.

    Opened in 1964, by President Adolfo López Mateos, the exhibition halls surround a patio with a small pond and a vast square concrete umbrella supported by a single slender pillar around which splashes an artificial cascade.
    The halls are ringed by gardens, many of which contain outdoor exhibits.

    Some of the most fascinating exhibits are the Aztec calendar stone, giant stone Olmec heads from the jungles of Tabasco, treasures recovered from a sacred Maya well, a replica of a Maya ruler's tomb from Palenque and ethnological displays of rural Mexican life as it is still lived today.
    It also has a very good model of the location and layout of Tenochtitlan, which puts present-day Mexico City in perspective.

    The entrance from Reforma is marked by a colossal statue of the rain god Tláloc, the story goes that its move here from its original home in the east of the city was accompanied by furious downpours in the midst of a drought.
    As you come into the entrance hall there's a shop selling postcards, souvenirs, books in several languages on Mexican culture, archeology and history, and detailed guides to the museum, which provide full descriptions of most of the important pieces.
    Straight ahead is a small circular space with temporary exhibitions, usually devoted to the latest developments in archeology and often very interesting.

    More of these lie to the right, beyond Rufino Tamayo's mural of a battling jaguar and serpent, where you'll also find the library and museum offices as well as the small 'Sala de Orientación', which presents an audiovisual overview of the major ancient Mexican cultures.

    (continue next block)

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    The Anthropology Museum: Museo de Antropologia

    by petirrojo Updated Oct 2, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    El Museo Nacional de Antropologia

    Not only is this museum an excellent place to learn about the extremely diverse cultures of ancient Mexico, but it's an architectural gem too.

    Every time I'm in the DF I make time to visit and I never leave without some new bit of fascinating information.

    Signage is in both Spanish and English.

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    • Architecture
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    Museo Nacional de Antropologia

    by darthmilmo Written Feb 25, 2003

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museo Nacional de Antropologia

    The impressive "Museo Nacional de Antropologia" is a must see of not only the city, but Mexico itself. It is one of the best museums about the Mexican and Meso-American civilizations. I ventured through its endless exhibitions for half a day. If you feel burned out, then head outside for a brake. If hunger calls, then head to the cafeteria, which offers delicious food.

    Note: the picture is of the central fountain in the compounds. It pales in comparison to the thousands of treasures inside the halls.

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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Museo de Antropologia

    by filipdebont Written Oct 13, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museo de Antropologia

    El Museo Nacional de Antropologia is located in the Bosque de Chapultepec.
    Best is to take the metro till the station of Chapultepec, and then you can walk through this big park, which this Bosque de Chapultepec is. This museum is very, very big. On the lower floor there are 12 exhibition halls, which show the different regions of Mexico, and one especially for the Maya culture; on the upper level you can see a collection of clothing, housings, and utensils of the 56 still existing local cultures in Mexico. You can easily spend a day in this really interesting museum. It is really interesting to visit this museum before you start exploring the different archeologically sites all across Mexico.

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  • vela_candela's Profile Photo

    Museo de Antropologia: you...

    by vela_candela Written Sep 2, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    Museo de Antropologia: you can visit all the cultures that have lived in Mexico, their evolution. You cand spend several days if you want to have an exhaustive visit.

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  • The National Museum of...

    by ChicaAmable Written Aug 24, 2002

    The National Museum of Anthropology will be of great interest to anyone who anyone who is interested in the pre-Colombian indian cultures of Mexico. This headdress is a replica of the one worn by the Aztec emporer Moctezuma. It is made of quetzal feathers. The original headdress is in a museum in Europe. This museum also has the Aztec calendar stone.
    In front of the museum is an indian statue of Tlaloc, god of rain. It is said that when the statue was placed in front of the museum, it rained for days and days in Mexico City.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Museo Nacional de Antropologia

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Apr 14, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museo Nacional de Antropologia
    4 more images

    By far the best museum in Mexico City and one of the best displays of New world antiquities. This museum displays remants from all of Mexico's varied pre-Colombian civilizations from Aztec to Maya.

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    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    Museum of Anthropology

    by el_ruso Written Feb 27, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    god Tlaloc
    4 more images

    This is an excellent museum, offering exhibits on pre-columbian archeology and modern day anthropology. Inside there is a very creative fountain.

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    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology

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  • Christian.Lafont's Profile Photo

    Antropological museum, inside 2

    by Christian.Lafont Written Sep 30, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The perfect couple, close to each other for years, looking in the same direction ... forever stone love :))

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