Teotihuacan, Mexico City

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  • Teotihuacan
    by fachd
  • Avenue of the Dead
    Avenue of the Dead
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  • Pyramid of the Moon
    Pyramid of the Moon
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  • asolotraveler's Profile Photo

    Climbing The Pyramids

    by asolotraveler Updated Dec 27, 2013
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    I was not sure what all I wanted to do in Mexico City. I did know one thing which I found via the internet, they have Pyramids. I had booked the early morning tour due to the fact that there would be hardly any tourist at theat time of the morning. I was picked up by my tour guide, Gersom and off we went with only one other person, Carolino from Columbia. 40 minutes outside of Mexico City along the 2nd longest highway in the world, we came to the entrance of the park. We went in and Gersom led us around the area and then he directed us towards the smaller of the two Pyramids that we were going to climb. I looked up at the top of the "Moon" Pyramid and thought to myself, no way.
    Gersom, a really nice and very animated fellow edged me on. When I saw Carolino beginning the climb, I handed Gersom my camera and headed up after her. She was several steps (looked like a mile to me) ahead and still climbing. I grabbed hold of the railing which was metal covered in leather and began pulling myself up each step. This was going to be a chore because the step are almost lateral and far apart. How did they do it?, I don't know I thought they were short people. I stopped after every 5-7 steps. I kept Carolino in view. She was out of view and then I came to that final step where I was on top and I turned and outstretched my arms indicating that I had made it. We stayed up there about an hour with Gersom explaining to us what we saw all around us. I notice by now that people were beginning to come down the "Avenue" of the Dead. We descened and moved along to a level top pyramid. There are many pyramids laying around the sides. We then approached the largest of the Pyramids which is the "Sun" Pyramid. I knew from the sight of it, that I was not going to even attempt the 240 something stairs to the top. Of course Gersom tried his best to encourage me, but to no avail. I sat on the ledge and let the two of them go without me. It took them a while to get to the top, stopping along the way. At the top they stayed about an hour and them made the climb down. By this time, other tour people were about. There were trinket vendors all around if you wanted to buy anything what they were selling though there is a nice Museum Gift shop on the grounds though they were a bit more expensive. After coming down from the Sun Pyramid, we walk towards the Museum and entered. It was dimly light and we were shown an amazing relief of the many Pyramids. We walked over this platform that had been built over the area of the pyramids and the surrounding area. It was just beautiful. The museum was nice but I am not into looking at "Human" sacrifice remains though I did take some pictures. On the way to the Gift Shop, I notice an area that looked like there were lots of independant vendors which I wanted to visit but Gersom the tour guide had other plans for us. We were led over to an area where we were seated and then introduced to the famous "Mescal". OK I admit, I have never had the stuff before and they had these little plastic Medicine cups filled with different flavors. Were they trying to get me drunk or what. I will admit that it was tasty. We saw other displays and then went in to the "Gift" Shop and then to our "all you can eat" buffett lunch which was OK. I was not impressed by the Chicken Mole that I had heard so much about. The tour was a very nice and I enjoyed myself alot. The Tour guide made it all very special.

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    City of Teotihuacan

    by fachd Updated Dec 21, 2013
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    We visited the City of Teotihuacan and glad we did. We hired a private car with driver who is our tour guide. It took him about an hour and half drive from Condessa where we stayed. Teotihuacan is located about 46km north east of Mexico City. This ancient ruin is big it will take you few hours to explore. There are two large pyramids, the Pyramid of the Sun and Pyramid of the Moon. If you are not afraid of height both of the pyramid can be climb. I was too chicken but my partner climb to the summit of both pyramids. Then there’s the Temple of Quetzalcoatl (Fethred Serpent), the Avenue of the Dead, which is about distance of km. Along the Avenue of the Dead you’ll see original murals that has been preserved and well kept and Quetzalpapaloti the family residential house. Make sure bring umbrella or buy yourself large Mexican hat from the gift shop, sun cream and plenty of lubrication because when we were there it was stinking hot.

    Open Daily 7am – 6pm
    Entrance: $57

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  • etfromnc's Profile Photo

    World's 3rd largest pyramid and his little sister

    by etfromnc Written Sep 12, 2012

    The best retreat into the ancient past from the nearby sinking modern urban jungle of Mexico City is the stunning complex of Teotihuacán, which translates into English as "The place where the gods were created." While I would have trouble agreeing with that this site, set amid what was once the greatest metropolis in Mesoamerica, is known for its two vast pyramids: Pirámide del Sol (the world’s third largest pyramid, built around AD 100 and painted bright red in its heyday) and Pirámide de la Luna (smaller and more gracefully proportioned than its sunny counterpart). Urban planners, take note: the city’s grid plan was plotted in the early parts of the 1st century AD.
    You must also visit the Temple of Quetzalcoatl while you are there.
    The archaeological site of Teotihuacan corresponds to a city of at least 25,000 inhabitants. Teotihuacan and its valley bear unique testimony to the pre-urban structures of ancient Mexico.
    This ensemble represents a unique artistic achievement as much for its enormous size as for the strictness of a layout based on cosmic harmony. The art of the Teotihuacanos was the most developed among the Classic civilizations of Mexico. Here it is expressed in its successive and complementary aspects: the dry and obsessive geometry of the Pyramids of the Sun and the Moon contrasts with the sculpted and painted decor of exceptional richness of the Pyramid of Quetzalcoatl, the Plumed Serpent.

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    TEOTIHUACAN

    by draguza Written Feb 12, 2012

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    PYRAMID OF THE MOON

    Teotihuacan is an hour and a half drive north of Mexico City and I recommend you devote a full day to visiting.
    There are two main pyramids, the Sun and the Moon, the first one is larger and taller and you can climb both of them. The sun is a bit difficult but once you get to the top you will have an incredibly beautiful view of the valley.

    You can also walk around what was once the main avenue called Calzada de los Muertos (Avenue of the Dead) and see many small buildings and new discoveries from on-going excavations. You will be approached by locals selling figurines that resemble originals that are housed in the Anthropology museum, they make great souvenirs.
    If its a hot and sunny day, you would be advised to take comfortable shoes, a hat and sunscreen. Walking all the way up to the Pyramid of the Sun is taxing, but if you just walk around the site you will still appreciate the grandeur of Teotihuacan.

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  • tampa_shawn's Profile Photo

    Mexican Pyramid - teotihuacuan pyramids

    by tampa_shawn Updated Apr 30, 2011

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    Teotihuacan an archeological site known for the sun and the moon pyramids.

    The site is 25 miles (40 km) north of Mexico City. You can visit this via tour or by taking the bus and grab on to a tour there (or wander around by yourself).

    Most hotels offer day tours to the sites.

    Buses leave from the Central del Norte (take a metro there). Take the buses marked "Piramides." Follow the directions in the Lonely planet guide book. Also be sure to visit the museum

    For those of you who would like to see a video...here is one from the travel channel
    http://www.travelchannel.com/Video_%26_Photos/Video_Detail?videoRef=TITLE1106

    Here is a step by step guide of the ruins
    http://gomexico.about.com/od/ancientsites/ss/teotihuacan.htm

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    The main american city 1,500 years ago

    by ciberamigo Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The sun pyramid in the background
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    Founded around 200 BC, it flourished between 250-650 AD when it was the main religious center with pilgrimages arriving from all Mesoamerica* and was the largest city in the continent, with a population of 200,000. Please note that Teotihuacans were a different culture from Aztecs; the latter arrived to the area 500 years after Teotihuacan was abandoned.

    Architecture is both monumental, as in the Sun and Moon pyramids, and intimate, as in the houses and smaller temples.

    This is a place where you need to walk a lot to get to the most interesting structures (the ciudadela, the 'palace' of Quetzalpapalotl and the pyramids) as there is a 2.4 km (about 1.5 mile) distance between extremes. Protect yourself from the sun (it would not be an exaggeration to carry an umbrella besides the sunblock lotion).

    Teotihuacan is located about 45 km (30 mi) northeast of Mexico city's center. There are two main ways to get there:
    1. With an organized tour, which is expensive and most likely won't give you a long time to explore the area. This is, however, a comfortable and time-efficient alternative.
    2. Getting there by bus. Buses depart from Mexico City's Central de autobuses del norte (northern bus terminal). Metro station "Autobuses del norte" -Line 5, yellow- is right next to the bus terminal. Once inside, walk left to get to the "Autobuses Teotihuacanos" counter; the ticket is 30 pesos (less than 3 U.S. Dollars). This alternative is unexpensive and gives you the opportunity to watch closely the unfortunate northeastern area of the city, slums included, but takes a long time (minimum 1.5 hour from the bus terminal) to get to the archaeological zone.

    The archaeological zone is open Monday to Sunday from 8:00 to 17:00. It includes an excellent museum.

    *Mesoamerica is the name for the geographic region that integrates the five cultural areas of Mexican prehispanic civilizations: Central Mexico, Gulf coast, Western, Oaxaca, and Maya.

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  • jlanza29's Profile Photo

    WOW !!!!!!

    by jlanza29 Updated Mar 24, 2011
    WOW !!!!

    ......WOW !!!!!! The pyramids of the Sun and Moon are impressive and GIGANTIC !!!!!! So I can't even imagine the ones in Cairo !!!! lined with smaller temples and structures the highlight of this site are the Sun and Moon pyramids......try to climb either one and the reward when on top is breathtaking !!!!! Crowded at all times, come early to achieve the feat of climbing of both pyramids !!!!! worth an all day trip !!!!

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    Serpents of feathers and fire

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Sep 6, 2009

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    Teotihuacan was old long before the Aztecs arrived in the Val de Mexico and built the cities the Spaniards found.

    Construction of the Pyramids of the Sun and the Moon began around 100BC. The reason for their construction is still a mystery, though it is believed the Pyramid of the Sun was built over the sacred Cave of Creation

    The third Pyramid - the Templo Quetzalcoatl (the Feathered Serpent Pyramid) has been dated to about 150-250AD and, by virtue of its elaborately decorated facade, is presumed to have served a more recognisably ritualistic purpose. It is known that there were once seven levels to this pyramid - only four remain - and there is good evidence that there was once a temple on the top. Later centuries saw this pyramid enclosed within a larger structure and it is as a reult of this enclosing that the facade we see today is in such good condition.

    Two deities appear over and over on the facade of this structure - Qetzalcoatl, the Feathered Serpent, the chief deity of these early people, and the fire serpent, Tlaloc, with his four eyes and huge fangs. It was his task to carry the sun across the sky each day.

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    Mankind greatness at Sun and Moon Temples

    by romanista2000 Written Aug 12, 2009

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    I and a friend from Mexico went to visit Mexico D.F. most ancient and great wonder: the complex and sacred area of the pre-colombian period. What we found, once there, was an old ensemble of ruins dated back from the XI century AC, which takes anyone visiting the area dreaming of what it was in old times. The greatest remains are well preserved trough the years and Mexican archeologists and authoritities did a good job in order to preserve and restore the huge area of interest. The built area runs along a 1 km long with a few hundreds meters width and from the top of the huge Sun's pyramid you may have the sight lost at the breathtaking view of the below ruins and ancient vestiges. All is great and that alone was our long the journey to Mexico D.F. made a worth. Have no words at describing the sensation I fel and I and may friend had long talk after the visit about it. I would reccommend to anyone having the wish to go there early in the morning when not to many vendors are in plase, to hassle tourists with their (costly) souvenirs. I have no doubt the monumental site gets a well deserved place in the World heritage's list.

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    Teotihuacan

    by malianrob Written Sep 20, 2008

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    Going to the Piramides of Teotihuacan is an absolute must when you make a trip ti Mexico City. They are about 45 minutes away if traffic isnt too bad. They are amazing! This was the ancient city of Teotihuacan (the capital of the Aztec empire).
    Admission here runs about $5 dollars and if you bring a video camera its a little more. You will find three rather large piramides. The largest being the Piramide of the Sun which they say is just alittle smaller than some of the Pyramids in Egypt.
    We climbed the Piramide if the Sun all the way to the top. They say that at the top there is an energy field that you can connect with. I personally didnt feel anything excpet totally out of breath. The climb down wasnt bad and then we set out to climb the Piramde of the moon. It seems that even though it was smaller the the Sun Piramide it was much more steep. There was also some reconstruction or repairs happening at the top so we could only go alittle more than half way.
    If you would like more information of Toetihuacan you can check out my Teotihuacan pages, They are under construction right now, But I hope to finish them soon.

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    the pyramids at tetihuacan.

    by cachaseiro Updated Apr 21, 2008

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    teotihuacan.
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    teotihuacan is one of the great highligts of mexico.
    it´s located a little north of mexico city and doable in a day.
    the pyramids at teotihuacan are from a civilisation that is not fully discoverd yet and still a mystery in many ways.
    they are incredibly scenic and the whole temple area is very interesting and very well preserved.

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  • the legend of power and energy

    by Manyana Updated Nov 16, 2007

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    me and my tourist friends

    since i'm an arab woman and i only knew about the great pyramids in egypt, i said i should see some mexican pyramids. do they really exist on the other side of the world? so *hurray* i did.

    the tourist van picked me up from my hotel just to meet up with other tourists from other hotels, from panama, russia and mexico itself. i remember that i spoke and made friends with everyone - as usual. but i particulary enjoyed the company of a family from santa cruz (central america) who only spoke spanish, a mother and cute two daughters. when we arrived at Teotihaucan, the land of the pyramids, we were stunned by two great pyramids and quite a few little ones, dispered over a huge land. one of the pyramids was full of pilgrims and the other was nearly abandoned except from crazy tourists like me. i found out later that the abandoned pyramid was to take the best photo shot, while the other was to get empowered by the energy it is producing.

    tita, patricia, penolope and i climbed up the free pyramid, had a spectacular view, a break for a bit. then tita, the mom, was too tired to climb up the other pyamid. that was where i used my fantastic spanish to convince her,lol

    "no senora. esa pyramida por energia", everyone was supposed to have traditional beliefs about this energy, so i used the energy card, and was pointing to the sky with both arms.
    she was a bit hesitant but she was in need for this energy, at least to refresh what she has lost climbing up the first pyramid. so we did. we felt 'renewed'.

    honestly, i love doing these cultural practices, experiencing the honesty the local people express when they're so much dedicated to believing in something. and it's so much fun and sincere.

    when you go to the pyramids, just look where the people are gathering. go up. take a look at the legendary place you're standing on. you'll feel you're connected with the ancient gods and goddesses, living their story, being refreshed and most important, realising that you're an extension to their legendary history.

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    Pyramid of the Moon

    by anagrettel Written Oct 19, 2007

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    Pyramid of the Moon

    The Pyramid of the moon at Teotihuacan appears to be as tall as the Pyramid of the Sun due to the fact that it is built on higher ground. This pyramid was built slightly later than the Pyramid of the Sun, perhaps around the time the first was finished.

    The top of the Pyramid of the Moon provides the best overall view of Teotihuacan. The sight of the ruins stretching both sides of the mile long Avenue of the Dead opens ones eyes to how truly great this city once was.

    We didn't have the opportunity to climb it because of time available and the hot weather.

    THe photo was taken from the top of the pyramid of the Sun and in the Back you can see the Pyramid of the Moon.

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    Pyramid of the Sun

    by anagrettel Written Oct 19, 2007

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    Pyramid of the Sun
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    The Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacan was built in the first century AD. The alignment of this pyramid was designed to coincide with the two days a year (May 19th and July 25th) when the Sun would be directly over the top of the pyramid at noon. The East facade directly faces the rising Sun, and the West facade directly faces the Sun as it sets.

    A visit to México city can't be complete without a visit to Teotihuacan, it really worth it. Even my 4yrs old enjoy climbing the pyramid, it was a little scary on the way back for him, but there are some ropes that can be used as to hold in case you feeel like falling. It's a nice experience.

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    Teotihuacan pyramid

    by anagrettel Written Oct 19, 2007

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    Teotihuacan

    Include the immense Pyramid of the Sun (second largest in the New World) and the Pyramid of the Moon. The city's broad central avenue, is called "Avenue of the Dead". Along the Avenue of the Dead are many smaller talud-tablero platforms that are known to be ceremonial platforms that were topped with temples. Further down the Avenue of the Dead is the area known as the Citadel, containing the ruined Temple of the Feathered Serpent.

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